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Current Molecular Imaging News and Events, Molecular Imaging News Articles.
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Moffitt researchers develop tool to better predict treatment course for lung cancer
In a new article published in Nature Communications, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers demonstrate how a deep learning model using positron emission tomography/computerized tomography radiomics can identify which non-small cell lung cancer patients may be sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment and those who would benefit from immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. (2020-10-16)

Research demonstrates a molecular dance that keeps your heart beating
New research demonstrates a molecular dance that keeps your heart beating. The findings could someday lead to improved diagnostics and medical treatments for serious and sometimes devastating hereditary heart conditions. (2020-10-14)

Osteoarthritis biomarker could help 300 million people worldwide
University of South Australia researchers are a step closer to finding a new biomarker for osteoarthritis, a painful condition which affects more than 300 million people worldwide. (2020-10-11)

Pulmonary artery thrombosis a complication of radiation therapy
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, the imaging findings of in situ pulmonary artery thrombosis (PAT) associated with radiation therapy (RT) are different from those of acute pulmonary emboli and do not appear to embolize. Due to the differences in clinical prognosis and subsequent management strategies, in situ PAT associated with RT -- which has not previously been described in the English literature -- must be distinguished from pulmonary embolism. (2020-10-09)

Novel Radioimmunotherapy Reverses Resistance to Commonly Used Lymphoma Drug
A new radioimmunotherapy has proven effective in reversing resistance to the most commonly used lymphoma drug, rituximab, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. When used in combination with rituximab, 177Lu-lilotomab-satetraxetan was shown to substantially increase rituximab binding and rituximab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity, resulting in significant tumor growth delay in a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma mouse model. (2020-10-08)

Cerenkov luminescence imaging identifies surgical margin status in radical prostatectomy
A new intraoperative imaging technique, Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), can accurately assess surgical margins during radical prostatectomy, according to a first-in-human research published in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. The feasibility study showed that 68Ga-PSMA CLI can image the entire excised prostate specimen's surface to detect prostate cancer tissue at the resection margin. (2020-10-07)

First detailed look at how molecular Ferris wheel delivers protons to cellular factories
All cells with nuclei, from yeast to humans, use molecular machines called proton pumps to regulate the acidity of organelles - compartments where various types of work are done. A new study reveals a key step in how these Ferris wheel-like pumps operate. (2020-10-07)

Deep-brain imaging at synaptic resolution with adaptive optics 2-photon endomicroscopy
Recognizing the need for improved imaging capabilities, a group of scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) focused their sights on achieving brain imaging at synaptic resolution. (2020-10-06)

DECT in the ED: better diagnoses, less follow-up, more savings
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), dual-energy CT (DECT) added value to routine interpretation of emergency department (ED) imaging studies by increasing radiologists' diagnostic confidence, leading to a reduction in downstream imaging and associated costs. (2020-10-02)

AI can detect COVID-19 in the lungs like a virtual physician, new study shows
A University of Central Florida researcher is part of a new study showing that artificial intelligence can be nearly as accurate as a physician in diagnosing COVID-19 in the lungs. The study, recently published in Nature Communications, shows the new technique can also overcome some of the challenges of current testing. (2020-09-30)

NUS researchers solve decades-old problem of how to uniformly switch memristors
An international team, led by the scientists from the National University of Singapore, has developed a solution to uniformly switch memristors. This innovation addresses a long-standing problem in the field of organic and molecular electronics. (2020-09-29)

PLUS takes 3D ultrasound images of solids
A two-in-one technology provides 3D images of structural defects, such as those that can develop in aircraft and power plants. (2020-09-25)

Born to be wild: Fungal highways let bacteria travel in exchange for thiamine
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found a fungal-bacterial relationship that allows bacteria to travel along fungal highways and supply the fungus with thiamine (vitamin B1), which is essential to most organisms. Thiamine provided by the bacteria helped the fungal filaments to grow, and the highways let the bacteria travel farther than otherwise possible. Research in this area could be applied to settings ranging from fermentation to plant and human disease mechanisms. (2020-09-24)

Converting lateral scanning into axial focusing to speed up 3D microscopy
In optical microscopy, high-speed volumetric imaging is limited by either the slow axial scanning rate or aberrations introduced by the z-scanning mechanism. To overcome these limitations, scientists at UT Southwestern have introduced a novel optical design that transforms a lateral-scan motion into a scan in the third dimension. Their microscope realized laser focusing at a rate of 12 kHz and allowed observation of fast dynamics inside cells and the beating heart in Zebrafish embryos. (2020-09-23)

A multishot lensless camera in development could aid disease diagnosis
A new type of imaging that does not require a lens and uses reconfigurable particle-based masks to take multiple shots of an object is being developed by researchers at Penn State. The electric-field directed self-assembling mask technology is expected to have uses in lower-cost and faster disease diagnosis, the enhancement of optical microscopy, and may even lead to thinner cellphone technology. (2020-09-23)

Thin and ultra-fast photodetector sees the full spectrum
Researchers have developed the world's first photodetector that can see all shades of light, in a prototype device that radically shrinks one of the most fundamental elements of modern technology. (2020-09-22)

'Firefly' imaging method zooms in on 'the forces within us'
Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level. (2020-09-22)

Mining molecular data with cryo-EM unveils hidden biological secrets
In the new study, Abhishek Singharoy and his colleagues demonstrate that cryo-EM can be pushed to even greater extremes of clarity, by extracting precious information previously buried in the reams of cryo-EM data. (2020-09-22)

Photoacoustic microscopy for identifying sentinel lymph nodes of breast cancer
Tumor metastatic sentinel lymph nodes is difficult to distinguish from normal or inflamed lymph nodes (Inf-LN). Researchers designed a dual-targeting nanoparticle 5K-HA-HPPS for fluorescent/photoacoustic imaging of sentinel LN. Photoacoustic imaging showed a distinct spatial distribution of 5K-HA-HPPS among different LN statuses, which the signals were mainly distributed at the centre of T-MLN but at the periphery of normal and Inf-LNs. This ability to distinguish T-MLN has potential application value for surgeons in tumor surgery. (2020-09-22)

All-optical method sets record for ultrafast high-spatial-resolution imaging: 15 trillion frames per second
Scientists at Shenzhen University have recently developed an all-optical ultrafast imaging system with high spatial and temporal resolutions, as well as a high frame rate. Because the method is all-optical, it's free from the bottlenecks that arise from scanning with mechanical and electronic components. (2020-09-17)

PET/MRI improves lesion detection, reduces radiation exposure
A single-center observational study of more than 1,000 oncological examinations has demonstrated that positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) facilitates cancer staging as well as PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) and improves lesion detectability in select cancers, potentially helping to promote fast, efficient local and whole-body staging in one step. (2020-09-17)

Imaging probe to visualize Alzheimer's disease-related gamma-secretase in the brain
Scientists have developed a molecular imaging probe to reveal Alzheimer's-related γ-secretase in rodents and macaques with translational potentials in humans (2020-09-17)

Researchers have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector. It is based on miniaturized photonic circuits on top of a silicon chip. With a size 100 times smaller than an average human hair, the new detector can visualize features that are much smaller than previously possible, leading to what is known as super-resolution imaging. (2020-09-16)

New dopamine sensors could help unlock the mysteries of brain chemistry
In 2018, Tian Lab at UC Davis Health developed dLight1, a single fluorescent protein-based biosensor. This sensor allows high resolution, real-time imaging of the spatial and temporal release of dopamine in live animals. Now, the team expanded the color spectrum of dLight1 to YdLight1 and RdLight1. The increased light penetration and imaging depth of these variants provide enhanced dopamine signal quality allowing researchers to optically dissect dopamine's release and model its effects on neural circuits. (2020-09-15)

Imaging agent developed at Washington University spotlights inflammation
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a new PET imaging agent that detects signs of inflammation. Such a tracer could aid diagnosis and study of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer to COVID-19. (2020-09-14)

Thermal imaging enhances engineers' understanding of breast tumors
New research performed at The University of Texas at Dallas and published June 22 in Nature Research's Scientific Reports takes a critical step toward making digital infrared thermal imaging more useful for monitoring breast cancer. (2020-09-08)

Radiology research funding has increased -- still no association with citation rate
According to ARRS' AJR, almost half of the research articles published in AJR, Radiology, and European Radiology declared funding -- a proportion that has increased from 17% of articles in 1994 and 26.9% published between 2001 and 2010. Most funded articles received support from federal sponsors or nonprofit foundations, whereas only a minority of funded articles were supported by private industry. Ultimately, adjusted linear regression analysis determined funding was not significantly associated with citation rate. (2020-09-03)

Using tattoo ink to find cancer
The humble ink in a tattoo artist's needle could be the key to improving the detection of cancer. Cristina Zavaleta and her team at the USC Viterbi Department of Biomedical Engineering and USC Michelson Center for Bioscience recently developed new imaging contrast agents using common dyes such as tattoo ink and food dyes. When these dyes are attached to nanoparticles, they can illuminate cancers, allowing medical professionals to better differentiate between cancer cells and normal adjacent cells. (2020-09-02)

Using magnetic resonance elastography to detect epilepsy
A new study from the Beckman Institute used magnetic resonance elastography to compare the hippocampal stiffness in healthy individuals with those who have epilepsy. (2020-09-02)

Imaging an estrogen related enzyme may help to predict obesity, self-control issues
Findings to be published in PNAS from a positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging study of the amygdala reveals that low levels of the enzyme aromatase, which catalyzes estrogen biosynthesis, are associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) and lower self-control, as measured by a standard personality test. (2020-08-31)

Why 'one day at a time' works for recovering alcoholics
''One day at a time'' is a mantra for recovering alcoholics, for whom each day without a drink builds the strength to go on to the next. A new brain imaging study by Yale researchers shows why the approach works. (2020-08-27)

Optical imaging enters sub-nanometer era
Researchers improved the spatial resolution from 8 nm to ~8 Å of photoluminescence imaging. It realized sub-molecular resolution with single molecule photofluorescence imaging for the first time. (2020-08-27)

Researchers pursue 'hidden pathology' to explain fatigue in multiple sclerosis
In a study published in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital used positron emission technology (PET) imaging to look for brain's immune cells that may become erroneously activated in MS, leading to fatigue. The team describes a potential link to brain inflammation that may help explain the connection between MS and fatigue. (2020-08-26)

Virtual imaging trials optimize CT, radiography for coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), virtual imaging trials using computational patient models and a human phantom with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) abnormalities via multidiagnostic confirmation of SARS-CoV-2 infection yield simulations of 'realistic' texture and shape--suggesting that such trials could be utilized to compare CT and radiography, improve both screening and follow-up protocols, and train artificial intelligence tools. (2020-08-25)

Lensless light-field imaging through diffuser encoding
Microlens array based light-field imaging generally suffers from an intrinsic trade-off between the spatial and angular resolutions. To this end, Scientists in China and German jointly proposed a lensless light-field imaging modality by using a diffuser as an encoder. Light rays can be decoupled from a detected image with adjustable spatio-angular resolutions, breaking through the resolution limitation of the sensor. This work indicates the possibility of using scattering media for lensless light-field recording and processing. (2020-08-24)

A new method for in vivo plant cell imaging with SNAP-tag proteins
A new method for visualizing in vivo protein dynamics in plant cells has been developed by Nagoya University scientists, offering an important step forward in plant cell fluorescent imaging. (2020-08-21)

Lipid-Oligonucleotides (LONs) --- Promising materials for bioapplications
Lipid-oligonucleotides (LONs) are promising biological materials with special amphiphilic structures and unique functionalities of two moieties, contributing to different bioapplications (from biosensors to biomedicines). LONs have been employed in cellular microenvironment monitoring and mechanical forces measurements, and have shown potential in developing targeted theranostics as well as controllable nanoreactors. This review will discuss the recent progress of using LONs in various bioapplications and the remaining challenges, while leaving some suggestions for future improvement. (2020-08-20)

Archaeology: X-ray imaging provides unique snapshot of ancient animal mummification
Analysis of three mummified animals - a cat, a bird and a snake - from Ancient Egypt using advanced 3D X-ray imaging is described in a paper published in Scientific Reports. The technique provides insights into the conditions in which the animals were kept, their complex mummification process and their possible causes of death, without causing damage to the specimens. (2020-08-20)

The MOF-based multicolor single-mode microlaser
Multi-color single-mode polarized micro-lasers with visible to near-infrared outputs are very potential in photonic integration and multimodal biochemical sensing/imaging and yet to realize. Recently, scientists in China combined methods of in-situ assembly and homogeneous epitaxy to hierarchically assemble dye molecules with different gain bands in a single metal-organic framework (MOF) microcrystal, successfully realizing the multicolor single-mode polarized micro-laser with emission from green to near infrared. (2020-08-18)

Dynamic full-field optical coherence tomography: 3D live-imaging of retinal organoids
Optical coherence tomography offers astounding opportunities to image the complex structure of living tissue but lacks functional information. We present dynamic full-field optical coherence tomography as a technique to noninvasively image living human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived retinal organoids. Coloured images with an endogenous contrast linked to organelle motility are generated, with submicrometre spatial resolution and millisecond temporal resolution, creating a way to identify specific cell types in living tissue via their dynamic profile. (2020-08-18)

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