Current Money News and Events

Current Money News and Events, Money News Articles.
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Study sheds light on how people cope with health challenges and medical debt
A recent qualitative study sheds light on how people cope with health and financial challenges, highlighting the important role that communication plays in these coping strategies. (2021-02-16)

Helping consumers save more by bursting their bubble of financial responsibility
When people perceive that their past financial behaviors have fallen short of their desired standard, they start to save more to restore perceptions of financial responsibility. (2021-02-04)

Big name corporations more likely to commit fraud
Fortune 500 firms with strong growth profiles are more prone to corporate financial securities fraud than smaller, struggling companies, according to a recent study. Researchers examined more than 250 U.S. public corporations involved in fraud identified in SEC filings from 2005-2013, compared to a control sample of nonfraud firms. Trends emerged for a greater fraud risk including corporations listed in the Fortune 500, traded on the NYSE and that had strong growth imperatives. (2021-02-02)

An ancient economy
As one of the most experienced archaeologists studying California's Native Americans, Lynn Gamble(link is external) knew the Chumash Indians had been using shell beads as money for at least 800 years. (2021-01-28)

Is there a link between cashless payments and unhealthy consumption?
The widespread use of cashless payments including credit cards, debit cards, and mobile apps has made transactions more convenient for consumers. However, results from previous research have shown that such cashless payments can increase consumers' spending on unhealthy food. (2021-01-27)

Describing the worldviews of the new 'tech elite'
The new tech elite share distinct views setting them apart from other segments of the world's elite more generally, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hilke Brockmann from Jacobs University Bremen, Germany, and colleagues. (2021-01-20)

On the origins of money: Ancient European hoards full of standardized bronze objects
In the Early Bronze Age of Europe, ancient people used bronze objects as an early form of money, even going so far as to standardize the shape and weight of their currency, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Maikel H. G. Kuijpers and C?t?lin N. Popa of Leiden University, Netherlands. (2021-01-20)

Money matters to happiness--perhaps more than previously thought
Money matters to happiness, perhaps more so than previously thought, according to research from Matthew Killingsworth of the University of Pennsylvania. One potential reason: Higher earners feel an increased sense of control over life. ''Across decisions big and small, having more money gives a person more choices and a greater sense of autonomy,'' he says. (2021-01-18)

Saver or spender? People are not as financially responsible as they may think, study shows
According to new research from the University of Notre Dame, people think they are more financially responsible than they actually are. (2021-01-13)

For the right employees, even standard information technology can spur creativity
In a money-saving revelation for organizations inclined to invest in specialized information technology to support the process of idea generation, new research suggests that even non-specialized, everyday organizational IT can encourage employees' creativity. (2021-01-07)

Pandemic and forthcoming stimulus funds could bring climate targets in sight -- or not
The lockdowns that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic have reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, in the recovery phase, emissions could rise to levels above those projected before the pandemic. It all depends on how the stimulus money that governments inject into their economies is spent. A team of scientists, led by Dr. Yuli Shan and Professor Klaus Hubacek, University of Groningen, has quantified how different recovery scenarios may affect global emissions and climate change. (2020-12-22)

'The robot made me do it': Robots encourage risk-taking behaviour in people
New research has shown robots can encourage humans to take greater risks in a simulated gambling scenario than they would if there was nothing to influence their behaviours. Increasing our understanding of whether robots can affect risk-taking could have clear ethical, practiCal and policy implications, which this study set out to explore. (2020-12-11)

Algorithms and automation: Making new technology faster and cheaper
Additive manufacturing (AM) machinery has advanced over time, however, the necessary software for new machines often lags behind. To help mitigate this issue, Penn State researchers designed an automated process planning software to save money, time and design resources. (2020-12-08)

Measuring broken hearts: divorce has negative effects on physical and mental health
Divorce can be grueling, and researchers are interested in understanding the factors that affect mental and physical health during this experience. A recent study is the first to examine divorcees immediately after a divorce and finds that their mental and physical health is reduced, with conflict emerging a key factor. The results could help researchers to design interventions to support divorcees through their divorce. (2020-11-30)

Call for 'debt driving licence'
People borrowing money for the first time should only be given small amounts until they have proved their competence, a new study says. (2020-11-27)

Stirling research evaluates effectiveness of conservation efforts
New research from the University of Stirling into the effectiveness of international conservation projects could help to save endangered species from extinction. (2020-11-23)

Unlocking cheaper chemicals
A new technique to make cheaper more efficient biological enzyme hybrids could have valuable applications in future water recycling, targeted drug manufacturing and other industries, Flinders University green chemistry researchers say in a new publication. The model enzyme system, which immobilises a catalyst enzyme hybrid for continuous flow use in the high-speed vortex fluidic device, showed a 16-fold increase in its efficiency, the researchers say in American Chemical Society journal, ASC Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-11-22)

Despite industry wariness, stress tests found to strengthen banks of all sizes
Despite additional costs, increased restrictions, and issues stemming from compliance directives, research recently published by Raffi E. Garcia, an assistant professor in the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute shows that government-mandated stress tests are effective in strengthening the overall health of the multi-trillion-dollar American banking industry. (2020-11-17)

Utilizing a 'krafty' waste product: Toward enhancing vehicle fuel economy
Researchers from Kanazawa University have chemically modified Kraft lignin -- ordinarily considered in the paper industry to be a waste product -- and used it to produce quality carbon fiber. When optimized in the future as an automotive structural material, it may reduce the fuel needed to power your car. (2020-11-05)

Do small gifts to donors increase charity appeal ROI?
Pre-giving incentives have different effects on different outcomes. The best strategy depends on what the charity wants to achieve. (2020-11-04)

Happy endings trip up the brain's decision-making
The brain keeps track of the value of an experience as well as how it unfolds over time; overemphasizing the ending may trigger poor decision-making, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-10-19)

Save it or spend it? Advertising decisions amid consumer word-of-mouth
Most people have seen or heard from a friend, neighbor or family member about a product or service they've used and how their experience was. It's called observational learning or word-of-mouth. These communications don't provide an unbiased assessment of true quality. Given this, businesses are faced with the difficult decision of determining when and how to spend their ad dollars. (2020-10-19)

Tighter border policies leave migrants vulnerable to effects of climate change
New Princeton University research suggests that restrictive border policies could increase many people's vulnerability to extreme climate conditions and weaken economic prosperity by limiting their ability to emigrate from countries that are facing worsening conditions due to climate change, such as drought, heat waves, and rising seas. (2020-10-12)

Study finds severe financial stress for breast cancer patients during and after treatment
The effects of cancer treatment on a patient's body are easy to see, whether it is a lack of hair on their head, sores on their skin or a look of fatigue on their face. And while there has been a lot of discussion around these impacts, a new study looks at just how much the stress of financial hardship caused by cancer care and treatment can affect a patient's emotional, mental and physical well-being. (2020-10-06)

Forgetting past misdeeds to justify future ones
Proven fact: we remember our altruistic behaviour more easily than selfish actions or misdeeds that go against our own moral sense. Described as 'unethical amnesia' by scientists, it is generally explained by self-image maintenance. But could these selective oversights, not necessarily conscious, have a more strategic aim? To find out, a team of behavioural economists from the CNRS recruited 1322 volunteers in an online experiment which took place over two sessions. (2020-09-29)

The secretive networks used to move money offshore
The researchers at USC have made some discoveries about the network behind the Panama Papers, uncovering uniquely fragmented network behavior and transactions. This is vastly different from more traditional social or organizational networks, demonstrating why these systems of transactions and associations are so robust and difficult to infiltrate or take down (2020-09-29)

Higher narcissism may be linked with more political participation
A politically engaged electorate is key to any thriving democracy, but not everyone participates in elections and other political activities. New Penn State research found that people who are narcissistic may also be more politically active. (2020-09-25)

A pain reliever that alters perceptions of risk
While acetaminophen is helping you deal with your headache, it may also be making you more willing to take risks, a new study suggests. People who took acetaminophen rated activities like ''bungee jumping off a tall bridge'' and ''speaking your mind about an unpopular issue in a meeting at work'' as less risky than people who took a placebo, researchers found. (2020-09-08)

A spillover effect: Medicaid expansion leads to healthier dietary choices
Besides providing health care to millions, the Medicaid program helps recipients make healthier food choices, according to work UConn research recently published in the journal Health Economics. (2020-09-08)

Dealing a blow on monetarism
This year's third issue of the Financial Journal opens with an article by Marina Malkina, Professor at the Department of Economic Theory and Methodology of the UNN Institute of Economics and Entrepreneurship, and Igor Moiseev, research assistant at the Center for Macroeconomics and Microeconomics of the same Institute. Their article entitled ''Endogeneity of Money Supply in the Russian Economy in the Context of the Monetary Regime Change'' is published in the ''Monetary policy'' section. (2020-08-27)

Skat and poker: More luck than skill?
Chess requires playing ability and strategic thinking; in roulette, chance determines victory or defeat, gain or loss. But what about skat and poker? Are they games of chance or games of skill in game theory? This classification also determines whether play may involve money. Prof. Dr Jörg Oechssler and his team of economists at Heidelberg University studied this question, developing a rating system similar to the Elo system used for chess. (2020-08-21)

Revealed: How billions in EU farming subsidies are being misspent
A unique study has analyzed in detail how EU agricultural subsidies flow down to the local level. The new data show that most income support payments go to intensively farmed regions already above median EU income, while climate-friendly and biodiverse farming regions, as well as poorer regions, are insufficiently funded. Consequently, the majority of payments are going to the regions causing the most environmental damage and the farmers in the least need of income support. (2020-08-21)

Desire to be in a group leads to harsher judgment of others
In a time where political affiliations can feel like they're leading to tribal warfare, a research team from Duke has found that the desire to be part of a group is what makes some of us more likely to discriminate against people outside our groups, even in non-political settings. Some people are just more 'groupy' than others. (2020-08-17)

Child disability can reduce educational outcomes for older siblings
A recent paper published in The Economic Journal indicates that, in families with disabled children, the second born child is more adversely affected cognitively than the first-born child. (2020-08-13)

Many medical 'rainy day' accounts aren't getting opened or filled, study finds
One-third of the people who could benefit from a special type of savings account to cushion the blow of their health plan deductible aren't doing so, a new study finds. And even among people who do open a health savings account, half haven't put any money into it in the past year. This means they may be missing a chance to avoid taxes on money they can use to pay for their health insurance deductible and other costs. (2020-08-13)

Analysis: Health sector, big pharma spent big on lobbying for COVID-19 funding
To date, Congress has authorized roughly $3 trillion in COVID-19 relief assistance -- the largest relief package in history. With more COVID relief money on the way, a new analysis in the Journal of General Internal Medicine finds these newly available funds led to a significant surge in health sector lobbying activity, especially within the pharmaceutical industry. (2020-08-12)

Coastal flooding study finds trust-building, power-sharing key for environmental justice
It took two years and $11 million, but eventually ranchers, politicians and scientists came to a consensus about how to prevent flooding in Tillamook, a coastal Oregon town. A recent study by Portland State University researchers examined the social factors involved in this decision-making process. This study showcases how environmental justice can be served when affected parties have a seat at the table. (2020-08-12)

How to boost tips and donations with the dueling preference approach
The dueling preferences approach can be more effective than traditional approaches at increasing tips and small prosocial gifts. (2020-08-10)

Medicare Part D favors generic prescription drugs over branded counterparts, study finds
Published this week in Health Affairs, the study led by Stacie Dusetzina, PhD, Ingram Associate Professor of Cancer Research and associate professor of Health Policy, compared Medicare Part D coverage of more than 1,360 pairs of generic and brand-name drugs. The analysis found 0.9% of plans covered only the brand name drug in 2019, compared to about 84% of plans covering only the generic drug. Roughly 15% of plans covered both the generic and brand-name version. (2020-08-05)

Study reveals impact of powerful CEOs and money laundering on bank performance
Banks with powerful CEOs and smaller boards are more likely to take risks and be susceptible to money laundering. The study tested for a link between bank risk and enforcements issued by US regulators for money laundering in almost 1,000 publicly listed US banks. The results show that money laundering enforcements are associated with an increase in bank risk. The impact of money laundering is heightened by the presence of powerful CEOs and only partly mitigated by large and independent executive boards. (2020-08-04)

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