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Current Money News and Events, Money News Articles.
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Owe the IRS? No problem, some Americans say
A new study shows the surprising way that many American taxpayers adjust their standard of living when they owe money to the IRS versus when they receive tax refunds. Researchers found that when households received tax refunds, they immediately started spending that new money. But those same households didn't cut their spending in years when they owed taxes to the IRS. (2020-07-28)

Do campaign finance reforms truly help make elections more competitive?
A new study by two social scientists at the University of Missouri finds state campaign finance reforms actually have no beneficial effect on the competitiveness of state legislative elections. Instead, some reforms, such as limits on corporate political spending and public financing of elections, advantage incumbents. (2020-07-15)

Links between video games and gambling run deeper than previously thought, study reveals
A new study suggests that a number of practices in video games, such as token wagering, real-money gaming, and social casino spending, are significantly linked to problem gambling. (2020-07-14)

Researchers find the worst reason to give a gift
Here's a good way to make sure a friend hates a gift from you: Say it will save him money. In a series of studies, researchers found that people reacted negatively to gifts that they were told - or that they inferred - were given to help them save money. (2020-07-13)

Construction: How to turn 36 seconds into USD 5.4 billion
A team of researchers from Aarhus University have, for the first time ever, linked 40 years of productivity data from the construction industry with the actual work done. The results show that productivity in the construction industry has been declining since the 1970s. The results also explain the decline and how to achieve far more efficient construction in North America and Europe. The study has just been published in the scientific journal Construction Engineering and Management. (2020-07-10)

Study: Interplay of impact, moral goals influences charitable giving to different causes
With the rise of globalization, geographic borders are becoming less relevant for making charitable donations, which means nonprofits and charities can make more effective pitches to donors by emphasizing higher-level concepts such as morality and idealistic values, said Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at Illinois. (2020-07-07)

Pernicious effects of stigma
The recent killings of unarmed individuals such as George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and Tony McDade have sparked a national conversation about the treatment of Black people -- and other minorities -- in the United States. (2020-06-29)

BU study: High deductible health plans are widening racial health gaps
The growing Black Lives Matter movement has brought more attention to the myriad structures that reinforce racial inequities, in everything from policing to hiring to maternal mortality. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study points to a previously-unidentified factor widening the racial health gap: high deductible health plans. (2020-06-24)

Design flaws in Universal Credit for couples revealed as claims soar
As the numbers of new claims for Universal Credit reach three million, in the context of COVID-19, a new report reveals the complex issues couples experience with this new benefit. (2020-06-22)

It's not about money -- why academic scientists engage in commercial activities
For scientists, engaging in commercial activities such as patenting and starting new ventures can be much more lucrative than relying on pure academic work. However, according to new research by ESMT Berlin, money is not the main reason why scientists choose to work on commercial activities. Motives such as social impact seem more important. (2020-06-18)

BU study: Alcohol taxes have never been lower
Inflation has reduced American alcohol tax rates by 70% since 1933, according to a new study from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (2020-06-15)

Refugee children get better health, nutrition via e-vouchers
Electronic food vouchers provided young Rohingya children in Bangladeshi refugee camps with better health and nutrition than direct food assistance, according to new research led by Cornell University, in conjunction with the International Food Policy Research Institute. (2020-06-11)

Switching from aluminum to zinc alloys could improve sustainability of automotive parts
A new study reveals that switching from aluminum to zinc alloys in the production of automotive parts could greatly enhance their longevity and sustainability. The study, conducted by Cranfield University's Sustainable Manufacturing Systems Centre, compared three different alloys (Aluminium-A380, Magnesium-AZ91D and Zinc-ZA8). Over recent years aluminum alloys have been favoured by the automotive manufacturing industry for their lightweight properties and lower cost. (2020-06-08)

Climate change increases migration at the expense of the poor
A climate game developed by Max Planck researchers shows that global cooperation can be possible -- although not without effort. (2020-05-26)

Can interactive technology ease urban traffic jams?
Traffic congestion is a serious problem in the United States, but a new analysis shows that interactive technology -- ranging from 511 traffic information systems and roadside cameras to traffic apps like Waze and Google Maps -- is helping in cities that use it. (2020-05-26)

Study: Women entrepreneurs are more motivated by social impact than money
A new study from researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Columbia sheds light on the attributes that drive different types of entrepreneurs. By examining how entrepreneurs responded to motivation-related messages that involve money and social impact, the researchers concluded that women and people in altruistic cultures are more motivated by messages of social impact than by those related to money while men and people in less altruistic cultures are more motivated by messages related to money. (2020-05-20)

Free and open-source hardware enables more bang for your buck in research funding
A new study uses Finland, and specifically Aalto University, as a model to see how free and open-source hardware (FOSH) can save up to 90% from allocated research funding. A considerable cost for any research project is the need to acquire the necessary proprietary equipment. With the ease, speed and savings made from the use of FOSH, funding can be better used for more staff time and experiments. (2020-05-06)

Unplanned extubations in preterm infants leads to poor outcomes, increased care costs
Unplanned extubations in adult and pediatric populations have long been associated with poor clinical outcomes and increased costs to health care systems. (2020-05-06)

Memory misfires help selfish maintain their self-image
When asked to recall how generous they were in the past, selfish people tend to remember being more benevolent than they actually were, according to a series of experiments by Yale psychologists and economists at University of Zurich published April 29, 2020 in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-04-29)

Herpes virus decoded
The genome of the herpes simplex virus 1 was decoded using new methods. Hundreds of previously unknown gene products were found. The virus causes lip herpes, but can also be life-threatening. (2020-04-27)

Protecting yourself from the latest internet sex crime
Researchers from Michigan State University released a study on 'sextortion' -- a lesser-known internet crime that poses a threat to adults and minors -- that sheds light on the importance of protecting the public from online criminals. (2020-04-21)

Study estimates revenue produced by top college football players
The most elite players in college football increase revenue for their school football programs by an average of $650,000 a year, a first-of-its-kind study suggests. (2020-04-16)

Study shows European coins have antimicrobial activity in contrast to banknotes
Research due to be presented at this year's European Congress on Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows that European banknotes are more easily contaminated by microbes than coins. However, coins being made from antimicrobial metals such as copper does not completely stop them from being sources of contamination. (2020-04-16)

Money can't buy love -- or friendship
While researchers have suggested that individuals who base their self-worth on their financial success often feel lonely in everyday life, a newly published study by the University at Buffalo and Harvard Business School has taken initial steps to better understand why this link exists. (2020-04-09)

The physics that drives periodic economic downturns
A professor at Duke University says that the way spilled milk spreads across the floor can explain why economic downturns regularly occur. Because the economic prosperity derived from new ideas or inventions follows the same S-curve as the spreading of a substance over an area, it inevitably loses its return on investment toward the end of its life cycle. (2020-03-24)

Monty Python's silly walk: A gait analysis and wake-up call to peer review inefficiencies
Fifty years ago, Monty Python's famous sketch, 'The Ministry of Silly Walks,' first aired. The sketch pokes fun at the inefficiency of government bureaucracy. It opens with the Minister (John Cleese) walks in a rather unusual manner to his work, the Ministry of Silly Walks, where Mr. Pudey (Michael Palin) is waiting for him. Based on a gait analysis, a Dartmouth research team finds that the Minister's silly walk is 6.7 times more variable than a normal walk. (2020-03-12)

Knowledge of basic finances empowers elderly population in Japan
People with an understanding of basic finances are likely to be aware of existing legal and social services for people with dementia, according to a study of Japan's aging population. (2020-03-11)

Our brains are powerful -- but secretive -- forecasters of video virality
Our brains can predict the popularity of online videos, without us even knowing it. (2020-03-09)

How sound and visual effects on slot machines increase the allure of gambling
The sights and sounds of winning on a slot machine may increase your desire to play--and your memories of winning big, according to new research by University of Alberta scientists. (2020-02-27)

Desire for excitement fuels young offenders to commit crime, then skill takes over
Young burglars are driven by a desire for excitement when they initially commit crime, new research from the University of Portsmouth has found. (2020-02-25)

New tech takes radiation out of cancer screening
Researchers have developed a new, inexpensive technology that could save lives and money by routinely screening women for breast cancer without exposure to radiation. The system, developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo, uses harmless microwaves and artificial intelligence (AI) software to detect even small, early-stage tumors within minutes. (2020-02-24)

A little good is good enough -- excuses and 'indulgence effects' in consumption
Ecofriendly materials, produced under good work conditions -- convincing arguments for most of us. But how do consumers really weigh compliance with such ethical standards? Not as much as they think: Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology used an example from textile industry to demonstrate that customers unconsciously use a single ethical aspect as an excuse for less moral behavior regarding other aspects. They report about these 'indulgence effects' and their significance in PLOS ONE. (2020-02-21)

PSU study finds out-of-network primary care tied to rising ACO costs
Accountable Care Organizations -- or ACOs -- formed for the first time in 2011, designed to combat rising medical costs and provide more coordinated care to Medicare patients. But the savings have been inconsistent nationwide. A new Portland State University study looked at what's driving those inconsistencies and what ACOs might do to resolve the issue. (2020-02-14)

Hidden donors play significant role in political campaigns
A new analysis of millions of campaign funding records reveals the role of small contributions. (2020-02-10)

Green infrastructure provides benefits that residents are willing to work for, study shows
Urban areas face increasing problems with stormwater management. Green infrastructure, including features such as rain barrels, green roofs, rain gardens, and on-site water treatment, can provide affordable and environmentally sound ways to manage precipitation. However, green infrastructure is challenging to maintain, because it is decentralized across a city and requires constant maintenance and upkeep. One way city management can address those challenges is to rely on volunteers to help maintain such features. (2020-02-03)

Giving cryptocurrency users more bang for their buck
A new cryptocurrency-routing scheme co-invented by MIT researchers can boost the efficiency -- and, ultimately, profits -- of certain networks designed to speed up notoriously slow blockchain transactions. (2020-01-30)

Medicaid expansion reduce cancer, saves black lives
Expanding Medicaid in North Carolina could sharply lessen the burden of colon cancers in the state and save the lives of thousands of Black men as well as improving access to care for men of all races, UConn Health and University of North Carolina researchers report in the 27 January issue of PLOS One. (2020-01-29)

How the brain processes rewards
Researchers from HSE University, Skoltech and the University of Toronto analyzed data from 190 fMRI studies and found out that food, sex and money implicate similar brain regions whereas different types of reward favor the left and right hemispheres differently. The paper is to be published in Brain Imaging and Behavior. (2020-01-23)

Organized cybercrime -- not your average mafia
Research from Michigan State University is one of the first to identify common attributes of cybercrime networks, revealing how these groups function and work together to cause an estimated $445-600 billion of harm globally per year. (2020-01-16)

From as young as 4, children see males as more powerful than females
As early as 4 years old, children associate power and masculinity, even in countries considered to be more egalitarian like Norway. This is what scientists at the Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod (CNRS/UCBL1) report, in collaboration with the universities of Oslo (Norway), Lausanne and Neuch√Ętel (Switzerland), in a study published on Jan. 7, 2020, in Sex Roles. They also show that in some situations the power-masculinity association does not manifest in girls. (2020-01-09)

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