Current Morality News and Events

Current Morality News and Events, Morality News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 7 | 257 Results
The appearance of robots affects our perception of the morality of their decisions
Artificial intelligence and robotics are advancing at a rapid pace, with the number of autonomous intelligent machines making moral choices among us continuously on the rise. Knowledge in moral psychology pertaining to artificial intelligence and robotics is important when discussing the ethics of their development. (2021-02-22)

Latest review shows intensive care mortality from COVID-19 continued to fall in 2020, but improvement is slowing
A meta-analysis of global studies published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that intensive care morality from COVID-19 has continued to fall since the start of the pandemic, but the improvement is slowing and may have plateaued. (2021-02-01)

Living with autonomous systems "we can trust"
Autonomous systems are affecting virtually all aspects of society, so future designs must be guided by a broad range of societal stakeholders, according to a new report led by the Oden Institute at UT Austin. (2020-12-02)

States unfairly burdening incarcerated people with 'pay-to-stay' fees
Pay-to-stay, the practice of charging people to pay for their own jail or prison confinement, is being enforced unfairly by using criminal, civil and administrative law, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick led study. (2020-11-20)

Conservatives and liberals motivated by different psychological factors, new study shows
Liberalism and conservatism are associated with qualitatively different psychological concerns, notably those linked to morality, shows a new study that explores how political ideology and moral values are connected to motivated social cognition. (2020-11-11)

Hot-button words trigger conservatives and liberals differently
Researchers have linked a brain region to what they call neural polarization, offering a glimpse into the partisan brain in the weeks leading up to what is arguably the most consequential U.S. presidential election in modern history. (2020-10-20)

Forgetting past misdeeds to justify future ones
Proven fact: we remember our altruistic behaviour more easily than selfish actions or misdeeds that go against our own moral sense. Described as 'unethical amnesia' by scientists, it is generally explained by self-image maintenance. But could these selective oversights, not necessarily conscious, have a more strategic aim? To find out, a team of behavioural economists from the CNRS recruited 1322 volunteers in an online experiment which took place over two sessions. (2020-09-29)

Volunteers receiving government aid while unemployed face scrutiny, bias from public
With the worldwide spike in unemployment caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, many people may turn to volunteerism as a way to pass their newly found free time. But new research suggests that volunteers who also receive government aid are often judged negatively as ''wasting time'' that could be used to find paid employment. (2020-09-28)

Does a healthy diet counter the ill-effects of obesity?
A healthy quality Mediterranean-like diet partially modifies the association between obesity and cardiovascular mortality, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Karl Michaƫlsson of Uppsala University, Sweden, and colleagues. (2020-09-17)

The unintended consequence of becoming empathetic
Many people want to become more empathetic. But, these changes in personality may also lead to changes in political ideologies. (2020-09-16)

Invisible barriers cut down on cheating
Both see-through and pretend partitions promoted honesty in taking tests, psychology experiments show, suggesting simple environmental cues can nudge children to do the right thing. (2020-07-27)

Study: Interplay of impact, moral goals influences charitable giving to different causes
With the rise of globalization, geographic borders are becoming less relevant for making charitable donations, which means nonprofits and charities can make more effective pitches to donors by emphasizing higher-level concepts such as morality and idealistic values, said Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at Illinois. (2020-07-07)

What ethical models for autonomous vehicles don't address - and how they could be better
There's a fairly large flaw in the way that programmers are currently addressing ethical concerns related to artificial intelligence and autonomous vehicles (AVs). Namely, existing approaches don't account for the fact that people might try to use AVs to do something bad. (2020-07-06)

Moffitt researchers discover novel role of specific histone deacetylase in lung cancer
Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center are trying to identify alternative strategies to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a new article published online in Scientific Reports, they highlight how targeting the histone deacetylase HDAC11 may be a novel therapeutic strategy for NSCLC. (2020-03-26)

How does your body respond to feelings of moral outrage? It depends on your politics
USC study finds that liberals and conservatives feel moral violations in different areas of their bodies, interpret them as distinct complex feelings and make different moral and political judgments. (2020-01-08)

Fake news feels less immoral to share when we've seen it before
People who repeatedly encounter a fake news item may feel less and less unethical about sharing it on social media, even when they don't believe the information, research indicates. (2019-12-03)

Athletes suspend morality to pursue sporting success -- study
Ruthless sportspeople often suspend their sense of right and wrong when they step onto the field of play -- viewing sport as a different world where they jettison responsibility to act in a moral way, according to a new study. (2019-10-24)

Hunter-gatherers agree on what is moral, but not who is moral
Social psychologists from the University of Pennsylvania wanted to know whether there was a universal concept of moral character, by looking beyond Western populations. According to their work with the Hadza hunter-gatherers in Tanzania, the Hadza agree on which traits are relevant to moral character, but not on who has character. (2019-09-05)

Animal ethics and animal behavioral science -- bridging the gap
Animal ethics is an emerging concern across many disciplines. In an article in BioScience, an interdisciplinary group of scholars urges that this issue be taken up actively by animal behavior scientists. (2019-08-28)

Dangers of the blame game
The moral character of a victim of a product or service failure can influence how much consumers blame the victim for their suffering, which in turn affects how much consumers hold companies responsible. (2019-07-24)

A study analyzes the influence of political affinities in the processes of socialization
A study in which the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid participated (UC3M) has concluded that most people prefer not to have much to do with those who have political sympathies which are different from their own. Moreover, a substantial proportion of Spaniards are hostile towards those who do not have the same political preferences as them. The research appears in the latest issue of PLOS ONE. (2019-07-17)

Even today, we want our heroes to know right from wrong
In a world of sympathetic villains and flawed heroes, people still like fictional characters more when they have a strong sense of morality, a new study finds. Researchers found that people best liked the heroes they rated as most moral, and least liked villains they rated as most immoral. (2019-07-02)

What makes a good excuse work? A Cambridge philosopher may have the answer
The things we appeal to when making excuses are myriad: tiredness, stress, a looming work deadline, a wailing infant. But what do these various excuses have in common that allows us to recognize them all as plausible? A researcher from Cambridge University has suggested that the answers lie in what they all tell us about our underlying motivation. When excuses are permissible, it's because they show that while we acted wrongly, our underlying moral intentions were adequate. (2019-06-30)

Power to the people: How everyday acts of defiance can shape and change markets
Subtle, hidden and everyday acts of resistance and defiance by people with limited resources could have an impact on markets in societies where state and religion is all-powerful. These are the key findings of a new study, led by the University of Portsmouth, which shows consumers and individuals can help markets to evolve in societies where they cannot freely and openly participate in them. (2019-04-15)

When robots commit wrongdoing, people may incorrectly assign the blame
Last year, a self-driven car struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Ariz. The woman's family is now suing Arizona and the city of Tempe for negligence. But, in an article published on April 5 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, cognitive and computer scientists ask at what point people will begin to hold self-driven vehicles or other robots responsible for their own actions -- and whether blaming them for wrongdoing will be justified. (2019-04-05)

What makes people willing to sacrifice their own self-interest for another person?
Researchers show that people are more willing to sacrifice for a collaborator than for someone working just as hard but working independently. (2019-03-05)

Seven moral rules found all around the world
What is morality? And to what extent does it vary around the world? The theory of 'morality-as-cooperation' argues that morality consists of a collection of biological and cultural solutions to the problems of cooperation recurrent in human social life. These solutions or cooperative behaviors are plausible candidates for universal moral rules, and that morality-as-cooperation could provide the unified theory of morality that anthropology has hitherto lacked. (2019-03-04)

The good and evil of ghosts, governments, and machines
Perceptions of morality in non-people to be discussed at Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Convention in Portland, Oregon. (2019-02-06)

Certain moral values may lead to more prejudice, discrimination
People who value following purity rules over caring for others are more likely to view gay and transgender people as less human, which leads to more prejudice and support for discriminatory public policies, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association. (2018-12-20)

New research suggests language influences how consumers trust a brand
Consumers make assumptions based on the language used by a brand or advertiser, and politeness does matter, say researchers at the University of Oregon and University of Washington. (2018-11-16)

High stakes decision-making causes a little more cheating, a lot less charity
The age old adage of virtue being its own reward may not hold true in the corporate world -- in fact, honourable acts could lead workers to behave more selfishly later on, new research has shown. (2018-10-18)

Teachers' views on LGBQ students are changing
Over the past decade, the American school environment has become slightly more receptive towards students who identify as being either lesbian, gay, bisexual or queer (LGBQ). This is, in part, thanks to the changing attitudes of teachers, who have a substantial influence on school culture. In a new study published in Springer's journal Social Psychology of Education, William Hall and Grayson Rodgers document the attitudes of American teachers nationwide towards the LGBQ community. (2018-10-04)

Towards animal-friendly machines
Semi-autonomous and autonomous machines and robots can become moral machines using annotated decision trees containing ethical assumptions or justifications for interactions with animals. (2018-09-06)

Moral decision making is rife with internal conflict, say developmental psychologists
A new in-depth study of moral reasoning challenges the popular notion that people are unable to think through difficult moral problems and rely primarily on automatic 'gut' reactions to make tough decisions. (2018-08-02)

Hate speech from women is judged harsher than that from men
Women who make hateful remarks on social media are likely to be judged more severely than men who make the same comments. This is also true for reactions to hate speech (counter speech) which when made by women are less accepted than counter speech from men. This is according to a study published in Springer's journal Sex Roles by Claudia Wilhelm and Sven Joeckel of the University of Erfurt in Germany. (2018-07-31)

All thyroid cancers are not 'created equal'-- avoiding unnecessary or 'excessive' treatment
Drs. H. Gilbert Welch (The Dartmouth Institute) and Gerard Doherty (Brigham and Women's Hospital), analyze the steep increase in the number of people being diagnosed with thyroid cancer. Their analysis suggests that it points to not only widespread overdiagnosis, but also to overtreatment -- with the number of thyroidectomys on the rise when the choice between thyroidectomy and the less invasive lobectomy has little effect on the risk of death from thyroid cancer. (2018-07-25)

Narcissistic adolescents may perform better at school -- Queen's University Belfast researcher
A researcher at Queen's University Belfast suggests that the growing rate of narcissism in society could be linked with school achievement. (2018-06-26)

You don't need to believe in free will to be a nice person, shows new research
Social psychologist Damien Crone (University of Melbourne) and Philosophy professor Neil Levy (Macquarie University and the University of Oxford) conducted a series of studies of 921 of people and found that a person's moral behavior is not tied to their beliefs in free will. The results will appear in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. (2018-06-25)

The loss of a parent is the most common cause of brood failure in blue tits
Complete brood failure in blue tits is almost always associated with the sudden and permanent disappearance of one of the parents. Peter Santema and Bart Kempenaers from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen show in their study that the remaining parent substantially increased its effort to raise at least some of the chicks, which turned out to be successful in two thirds of the nests. (2018-06-12)

Don't force women to risk death, injury by having a baby
A QUT legal academic says abortion can be decriminalised without society and governments making a moral judgement. (2018-05-24)

Page 1 of 7 | 257 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.