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Current Mosquitoes News and Events, Mosquitoes News Articles.
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How mosquitoes smell human sweat (and new ways to stop them)
Female mosquitoes are known to rely on an array of sensory information to find people to bite, picking up on carbon dioxide, body odor, heat, moisture, and visual cues. (2019-03-28)
1 billion people will be newly exposed to diseases like dengue fever as world temperatures rise
As many as a billion people could be newly exposed to disease-carrying mosquitoes by the end of the century because of global warming, says a new study that examines temperature changes on a monthly basis across the world. (2019-03-28)
New model predicts substantial reduction of malaria transmitting mosquitoes
In much of sub-Saharan Africa, malaria is a huge public health burden. (2019-03-28)
Control of mosquito-borne diseases
Researchers from INRA, CIRAD, CEA, the University of Montpellier, and Chicago and Vanderbilt Universities in the United States have developed an innovative method for analysing the genome of the Wolbachia bacterium. (2019-03-26)
Protecting homes with netting window screens can reduce malaria parasite infection
Protecting houses against mosquitoes with netting window screens can suppress malaria vector populations and dramatically reduce human parasite infection prevalence. (2019-03-21)
Tracing the genetic origins of insecticide resistance in malaria-transmitting mosquitoes
Researchers have identified a single genetic alteration in a malaria-transmitting mosquito species that confers resistance to a widely used insecticide, according to a new study. (2019-03-20)
New mobile element found in mosquito parasite has potential for disease control
An interdisciplinary team of scientists has identified a new mobile DNA element in the Wolbachia parasite, which may contribute to improved control strategies for mosquito vectors of diseases such as Dengue and West Nile virus. (2019-03-20)
Zika study may 'supercharge' vaccine research
Scientists looking at the genetics of Zika virus have found a way to fast-track research which could lead to new vaccines. (2019-03-18)
The Lancet: Mosquito-killing drug reduced malaria episodes by a fifth among children, according to randomised trial
Childhood malaria episodes could be reduced by 20 percent -- from 2.49 to 2 cases per child -- during malaria transmission season if the whole population were given a drug called ivermectin every three weeks, according to the first randomised trial of its kind including 2,700 people including 590 children from eight villages in Burkina Faso, published in The Lancet. (2019-03-13)
To slow malaria, cure mosquitoes with drug-treated bed nets
Researchers found that they could use the same drug -- atovaquone -- used to treat the malaria parasite when a person gets sick, coat mosquito bed nets with it, and let mosquitoes ingest the anti-malarial drug. (2019-03-11)
Protection from Zika virus may lie in a protein derived from mosquitoes
By targeting a protein found in the saliva of mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, Yale investigators reduced Zika infection in mice. (2019-03-11)
Global maps enabling targeted interventions to reduce burden of mosquito-borne disease
The global population at risk from mosquito-borne diseases -- including yellow fever, Zika and dengue - is expanding with changes in the distribution of two key mosquitoes: Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. (2019-03-04)
Forecasting mosquitoes' global spread
New prediction models factoring in climate, urbanization and human travel and migration offer insight into the recent spread of two key disease-spreading mosquitoes -- Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. (2019-03-04)
Medicating mosquitoes to fight malaria
Mosquitoes that landed on surfaces coated with the anti-malarial compound atovaquone were completely blocked from developing Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. (2019-02-27)
Mosquitoes that carry malaria may have been doing so 100 million years ago
The anopheline mosquitoes that carry malaria were present 100 million years ago, new research shows, potentially shedding fresh light on the history of a disease that continues to kill more than 400,000 people annually. (2019-02-11)
Genome scientists develop novel approaches to studying widespread form of malaria
Scientists at the Institute of Genome Sciences (IGS) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed a novel way with genome sequences to study and better understand transmission, treat and ultimately eradicate Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria. (2019-02-08)
Duke-NUS study: Interaction between two immune cell types could be key to better dengue vaccines
A sentinel immune cell in the skin surprises researchers by forming a physical connection with a virus-killing T cell. (2019-02-07)
Putting female mosquitoes on human diet drugs could reduce spread of disease
In a study publishing Feb. 7 in the journal Cell, researchers report that they have identified drugs that can reduce mosquito hunger for blood. (2019-02-07)
New findings could make mosquitos more satisfied -- and safer to be around
Scientists have learned new tricks that could be useful in preventing mosquito-borne illnesses such as Zika and yellow fever. (2019-02-07)
Who's listening? Mosquitos can hear up to 10 meters away
Mosquitoes can hear over distances much greater than anyone suspected, according to researchers at Cornell and Binghamton University. (2019-02-07)
Mosquitoes can hear from longer distances than previously thought
While most hearing experts would say an eardrum is required for long distance hearing, a new study from Binghamton University and Cornell University has found that Aedes aegypti mosquitos can use their antennae to detect sounds that are at least 10 meters away. (2019-02-07)
Insecticide resistance genes affect vector competence for West Nile virus
In a context of overuse of insecticides, which leads to the selection of resistant mosquitoes, it is already known that this resistance to insecticides affects interactions between mosquitoes and the pathogens they transmit. (2019-01-31)
Male birth control for the malaria parasite
Disrupting two genes involved in the preservation of RNA molecules inhibits the ability of the male form of the malaria parasite to mature and be transmitted from human blood into mosquitoes, interrupting a key stage in the parasite's life-cycle and cutting off an important step in the spread of the disease. (2019-01-31)
To halt malaria transmission, more research focused on human behavior needed
Wherever possible, researchers should not just focus on mosquito behavior when working to eliminate malaria, but must also consider how humans behave at night when the risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito is highest, new findings from the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) suggest. (2019-01-22)
Urbanization changes shape of mosquitoes' wings
Research shows that rapid urbanization in São Paulo City, Brazil, is influencing wing morphology in the mosquitoes that transmit dengue and malaria. (2019-01-22)
New study raises hopes of eradication of malaria
After major global successes in the battle against malaria, the positive trend stalled around 2015 -- apart from in Zanzibar in East Africa, where only a fraction of the disease remains. (2019-01-21)
Zika and Chikungunya viruses: Diagnostic pitfalls
Millions of people have contracted Zika and chikungunya virus infections since the outbreaks that have been striking Latin America since 2013. (2019-01-17)
Mosquito known to transmit malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time
A type of mosquito that transmits malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time, and the discovery has implications for putting more people at risk for malaria in new regions, according to a study led by a Baylor University researcher. (2019-01-16)
Study: 'Post-normal' science requires unorthodox communication strategies
'Our aim,' the authors write, 'is therefore to use our collective experiences and knowledge to highlight how the current debate about gene drives could benefit from lessons learned from other contexts and sound communication approaches involving multiple actors.' (2019-01-14)
New CRISPR-based technology developed to control pests with precision-guided genetics
Using the CRISPR gene editing tool, researchers have developed a new way to control and suppress populations of insects, potentially including those that ravage agricultural crops and transmit deadly diseases. (2019-01-08)
Mosquito-specific protein may lead to safer insecticides
A protein required for development of mosquito eggs may provide a mosquito-selective target for insecticide development, according to a new study publishing on Jan. (2019-01-08)
Fighting human disease with birth control ... for mosquitoes
A newly discovered protein that is crucial for egg production in mosquitoes opens a possibility for 'mosquito birth control.' The approach might offer a way to reduce mosquito populations in areas of human disease transmission without harming beneficial insects such as honey bees. (2019-01-08)
For first time, researchers can measure insecticide on surface of mosquito nets
Insecticide-infused mosquito netting is in widespread use around the world to limit the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria. (2019-01-02)
Game over for Zika? KU Leuven researchers develop promising vaccine
Scientists at the KU Leuven Rega Institute in Belgium have developed a new vaccine against the Zika virus. (2018-12-19)
College textbooks largely overlook the most common animals
A recent study of textbooks aimed at introductory biology courses finds that they devote less than one percent of their text to discussing insects, which make up more than 60 percent of animal species. (2018-12-12)
NJIT researchers shine new light on disease-spreading mosquitoes
Physicists are now exploring laser-based technology traditionally used for studying conditions in the atmosphere -- such as Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) -- to shine a light on the subtlest of features of mosquito activity and better track populations that may carry a viral threat. (2018-12-12)
Researchers at LSTM identify additional mechanisms at play in insecticide resistance
Researchers at LSTM have used a bioinformatics approach to integrate information from multiple studies on insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and uncovered a number of important resistance mechanisms that had not previously been recognised. (2018-12-11)
Half a million tests and many mosquitoes later, new buzz about a malaria prevention drug
Researchers spent two years testing chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the malaria parasite at an earlier stage in its lifecycle than most current drugs, revealing a new set of chemical starting points for the first drugs to prevent malaria instead of just treating the symptoms. (2018-12-06)
Latest Cochrane review looks at pyrethroid-PBO nets for preventing malaria in Africa
Researchers from LSTM have confirmed that using pyrethroid-PBO treated nets to prevent malaria is more effective at killing mosquitoes in areas where there is a high level of resistance to pyrethroids. (2018-11-29)
Blood-sucking flies have been spreading malaria for 100 million years
The microorganisms that cause malaria, leishmaniasis and a variety of other illnesses today can be traced back at least to the time of dinosaurs, a study of amber-preserved blood-sucking insects and ticks show. (2018-11-26)
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