Current Motor Neurons News and Events | Page 25

Current Motor Neurons News and Events, Motor Neurons News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
Exercise improves brain function in overweight and obese individuals
New findings out of the University of TĂĽbingen show that, on top of its benefits for metabolism, mood, and general health, exercise also improves brain function. In recent studies, researchers learned that obese and overweight individuals are prone to insulin resistance in the brain, where it provides information about current nutritional status, as well as the rest of the body. So researchers wanted to know whether exercise can improve insulin sensitivity in the brain and improve cognition in overweight individuals. (2019-07-09)

Caspase-1 initiates apoptosis, but not pyroptosis, in the absence of gasdermin D
Caspase-1 triggers programmed necrosis called pyroptosis by gasdermin-D (GSDMD) cleavage. GSDMD-deficient cells are, however, susceptible to caspase-1-mediated cell death. Researchers at Kanazawa University and others discovered that caspase-1 proteolytically activates Bid and initiates apoptosis in GSDMD-deficient cells. Furthermore, cortical neurons and mast cells, exhibiting little GSDMD expression, undergo apoptosis after appropriate stimulation in a caspase-1- and Bid-dependent manner. This study clarifies molecular mechanisms and biological roles of caspase-1-induced apoptosis in GSDMD-low/null cells. (2019-07-05)

Active sexual life may benefit men with early Parkinson's disease
New research published in the European Journal of Neurology indicates that an active sexual life is linked with lower disability and better quality of life in men with early Parkinson's disease. (2019-07-03)

First complete wiring diagram of an animal's nervous system
In a study published online today in Nature, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine describe the first complete wiring diagram of the nervous system of an animal, the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, used by scientists worldwide as a model organism. The study includes adults of both sexes and reveals substantial differences between them. (2019-07-03)

Columbia researchers controlled the behavior in a mouse's brain with single-cell precision
In their study, published in Cell, the researchers demonstrated that specific groups of neurons, known as neuronal ensembles, have a causal role in behavior. The researchers used new optical and analytical tools to identify cortical ensembles in mice while they performed a visual task. They also used high-resolution optogenetics to simultaneously target selected neurons with single-cell precision, taking control of the mice's behavior. (2019-07-03)

Researchers reveal how protein mutation is involved in rare brain development disorder
Christianson Syndrome is a rare disorder whose symptoms include intellectual disability, seizures and difficulty standing or walking. Researchers at McGill University focusing on the intellectual disability aspect of the disease, have shown for the first time how a specific mutant form of the SLC9A6 encoding gene for the NHE6 protein affects the ability of neurons to form and strengthen connections. (2019-07-03)

Protein-linked sugars are crucial for the uptake of proteins linked to Parkinson's disease
New research from the University of Pennsylvania shows how glycoproteins, proteins with added sugar molecules, influence the uptake of protein aggregates that are associated with Parkinson's disease. The researchers also identified a specific presynaptic protein as a key regulator in this process, which opens the door for future research into new therapeutic targets. (2019-07-03)

Researchers elucidate mechanism between exercise and improved motor learning
Researchers in Jinan University, China has identified a critical molecular pathway that underlies exercise-improved neural plasticity and cognitive functions. This finding will benefit the future development of exercise intervention in ameliorating psychiatric disorders. (2019-07-03)

Parasitology -- On filaments and fountains
Microbiologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that Toxoplasma gondii, the parasite that is responsible for toxoplasmosis, utilizes at least two modes of locomotion during its infection cycle. (2019-07-02)

Tiny motor can 'walk' to carry out tasks
MIT researchers have assembled microrobots from a small set of standardized components, as a step toward self-replicating systems. (2019-07-02)

Unraveling the brain's reward circuits
Food, alcohol, and certain drugs all act to reduce the activity of hunger neurons and to release reward signals in the brain, but alcohol and drugs rely on a different pathway than does food, according to a new study led by University of Pennsylvania biologists. The findings could point researchers to new strategies to design weight-loss or anti-addiction drugs. (2019-07-02)

Study reveals a short bout of exercise enhances brain function
Neuroscientists at Oregon Health & Science University, working with mice, have discovered that a short burst of exercise directly boosts the function of a gene that increases connections between neurons in the hippocampus, the region of the brain associated with learning and memory. (2019-07-02)

Protein clumps in ALS neurons provide potential target for new therapies
UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified chemical compounds that prevent stress-induced clumping of TDP-43 protein in ALS motor neurons grown in the lab -- a starting point for new ALS therapeutics. (2019-07-01)

Glowing brain cells illuminate stroke recovery research
A promising strategy for helping stroke patients recover, transplanting neural progenitor cells to restore lost functions, asks a lot of those cells. To help them to integrate into the brain, the cells get help from 'optochemogenetics.' (2019-07-01)

Copper compound shows further potential as therapy for slowing ALS
A compound with potential as a treatment for ALS has gained further promise in a new study that showed it improved the condition of mice whose motor neurons had been damaged by an environmental toxin known to cause features of ALS. (2019-07-01)

Going the distance: Brain cells for 3D vision discovered
Scientists at Newcastle University have discovered neurons in insect brains that compute 3D distance and direction. Understanding these could help vision in robots. (2019-06-28)

Children living in countryside outperform children living in metropolitan area in motor skills
Residential density is related to children's motor skills, engagement in outdoor play and organised sports. that Finnish children living in the countryside spent more time outdoors and had better motor skills than their age peers in the metropolitan area. On the other hand, children living in the metropolitan area participated the most in organised sports. (2019-06-27)

Protein offers protection against nerve degeneration in ALS model
Increasing the levels of the anti-aging protein hormone Klotho improves the neurological deficits and prolongs life span in an experimental model with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In addition, brain immune cells called microglia play an important role in protecting the brain against inflammation and, likely, motor neuron loss in this model. (2019-06-27)

How obesity re-wires the brain's neurological food suppression system
Overeating, by cutting the brain's natural brakes on food intake, may result in neurological changes that continue to fuel pathological eating and lead to obesity, reports a new study in mice. (2019-06-27)

Deciphering how the brain encodes color and shape
There are hundreds of thousands of distinct colors and shapes that a person can distinguish visually, but how does the brain process all of this information? Scientists previously believed that the visual system initially encodes shape and color with different sets of neurons and then combines them much later. But a new study from Salk researchers, published in Science on June 27, 2019, shows that there are neurons that respond selectively to particular combinations of color and shape. (2019-06-27)

New research raises prospect of better anti-obesity drugs
Scientists have found a group of brain cells that influence body mass in two ways, by controlling how much we eat as well as how much energy we burn. The findings could lead to new drugs to help people shed weight. (2019-06-27)

New research shows Parkinson's disease origins in the gut
In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found additional evidence that Parkinson's disease originates among cells in the gut and travels up the body's neurons to the brain. The study, described in the June issue of the journal Neuron, offers a new, more accurate model in which to test treatments that could prevent or halt Parkinson's disease progression. (2019-06-26)

New mouse model of Parkinson's disease shows how it spreads from the gut
Parkinson's disease can begin in the gut and spread to the brain via the vagus nerve, researchers report June 26 in the journal Neuron. This pathway was observed in a new mouse model, which recapitulates both motor and non-motor deficits as well as early-stage and late-stage features associated with Parkinson's disease. (2019-06-26)

Learning from experience is all in the timing
Animals learn the hard way which sights, sounds, and smells are relevant to survival. New research in flies shows that the timing of these cues plays an important role in how mental associations arise, and elucidates brain pathways involved in this process. (2019-06-26)

ALS patients may benefit from more glucose
A new study led by scientists at the UA has uncovered a potential new way to treat patients with ALS, a debilitating neurodegenerative disease. (2019-06-26)

Unexpected mechanism allows CaMKII to decode calcium signaling in the brain
A new study from researchers at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience (MPFI) has shed light on the unexpected mechanism that allows calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, or CaMKII, to decode and translate calcium signaling in the brain. Using advanced imaging techniques and novel biosensors, Ryohei Yasuda, Ph.D. and his team have revealed new insights into CaMKII's activity at the single synapse level. (2019-06-26)

Distinct clinical profiles of Huntington's disease can be associated with two specific neural signature
Researchers from the Cognition and Brain plasticity group of Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro), with the collaboration of Radboud University in the Netherlands, have identified two specific patterns of cerebral disorders underlying two clinical profiles of Huntington's disease. The study, published in 'Neuroimage: Clinical', can help develop specific biomarkers and personalized treatments for each profile of this rare disease. (2019-06-25)

Researchers study healthy ALS neurons as way to understand resistance to the disease
Scientists have developed a stem-cell-based modeling system that identifies how some neurons are resistant to ALS -- a breakthrough that offers potential for battling neurodegeneration. (2019-06-25)

These neurons affect how much you do, or don't, want to eat
University of Arizona researchers have identified a network of neurons that coordinate with other brain regions to influence eating behaviors. These findings could help those suffering from disease-induced appetite loss or over-eating. (2019-06-25)

Mood neurons mature during adolescence
Researchers have discovered a mysterious group of neurons in the amygdala -- a key center for emotional processing in the brain -- that stay in an immature, prenatal developmental state throughout childhood. Most of these cells mature rapidly during adolescence, suggesting a key role in the brain's emotional development, but some stay immature throughout life, suggesting new ideas about how the brain keeps its emotional responses flexible throughout life. (2019-06-24)

Settling the debate on serotonin's role in sleep
New research finds that serotonin is necessary for sleep, settling a long-standing controversy. (2019-06-24)

Certain cells secrete a substance in the brain that protects neurons, USC study finds
USC researchers have discovered a secret sauce in the brain's vascular system that preserves the neurons needed to keep dementia and other diseases at bay. (2019-06-24)

New therapy promotes vascular repair following stroke
Following a stroke, antibodies that inhibit the signaling molecule Nogo-A can help repair blood vessels in the affected brain regions. This also promotes the regaining of motor functions, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown in a mouse model. The study opens up new avenues for treatment. (2019-06-24)

Structural development of the brain
In a recent study published in The Journal of Neuroscience, researchers reveal how the basic structure of the brain is formed. (2019-06-21)

Discovery of the cell fate switch from neurons to astrocytes in the developing brain
During mammalian brain development, neural precursor cells first generate neurons and later astrocytes. This cell fate change is a key process generating proper numbers of neurons and astrocytes. Here we discovered that FGF regulates the cell fate switch from neurons to astrocytes in the developing cerebral cortex using mice. FGF is a critical extracellular regulator of the cell fate switch, necessary and sufficient, in the mammalian cerebral cortex. (2019-06-21)

Virtual reality takes a leap into taste
optoPAD is a newly developed system for creating virtual taste realities. It combines advanced optical and genetic techniques with touch-screen technology to monitor and control feeding behaviors and taste sensations in fruit flies. This new tool, which is now being freely shared with the scientific community, significantly extends the toolset available to study feeding behavior in this model organism, which in turn may provide important insight into the neural circuitry that underlies food choice. (2019-06-21)

Scientists map toxic proteins linked to Alzheimer's
A team of researchers from McMaster University has mapped at atomic resolution a toxic protein linked to Alzheimer's disease, allowing them to better understand what is happening deep within the brain during the earliest stages of the disease. (2019-06-20)

Frustrated fish give up thanks to glia, not just neurons
Giving up when efforts are futile depends on glial cells called radial astrocytes, highlighting a novel computational role for the underappreciated brain cells. (2019-06-20)

Processed foods may hold key to rise in autism
University of Central Florida researchers are now a step closer to showing the link between the food pregnant women consume and the effects on a fetus' developing brain. (2019-06-20)

'Goldilocks' neurons promote REM sleep
It has been a mystery why REM sleep, or dream sleep, increases when the room temper-ature is 'just right'. Neuroscientists from Bern show that melanin-concentrating hormone neurons within the hypothalamus increase REM sleep when the need for body tempera-ture defense is minimized, such as when sleeping in a warm and comfortable room tem-perature. These data have important implications for the function of REM sleep. (2019-06-19)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.