Current Mountain Gorillas News and Events

Current Mountain Gorillas News and Events, Mountain Gorillas News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Dozens of new lichen species discovered in East African mountain forests
The species diversity and relationships of lichens in the genus Leptogium, which are often very difficult to identify to species, were assessed on the basis of DNA analyses using a large dataset collected during more than 10 years from East Africa. (2021-02-22)

Exaggerated radar data above the freezing level induced by terrain
Scientists find exaggerated radar data above the freezing level are induced by terrain. (2021-02-17)

Ferns in the mountains
In a new study in the Journal of Biogeography an international team of researchers led by Harvard University assembled one of the largest global assessment of fern diversity. The study integrated digitized herbarium data, genetic data, and climatic data and discovered 58% of fern species occur in eight principally montane hotspots that comprise only 7% of Earth's land area. And within these hotspots, patterns of heightened diversity were amplified at higher elevations above 1000 meters. (2021-02-16)

Bacteria and algae get rides in clouds
Human health and ecosystems could be affected by microbes including cyanobacteria and algae that hitch rides in clouds and enter soil, lakes, oceans and other environments when it rains, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. (2021-02-16)

'Sex, lasers and male competition:' fruit flies win genetic race with rivals
Male fruit flies with the most impressive sexual ornamentation also have super sperm that can outcompete that of rivals in the post-mating fertilization game. (2021-02-12)

Small mammals climb higher to flee warming temperatures in the Rockies
The golden-mantled ground squirrel is one of the most photographed animals in the Rocky Mountains. It's also joining many other species of rodents and shrews in Colorado that are making an ominous trek: They're climbing uphill to escape from climate change. (2021-02-11)

No new mountains formed during Earth's middle age, halting life's evolution for an eon
During the Proterozoic, Earth grew no taller - the tectonic processes that form mountains stalled, leaving continents devoid of high mountains for nearly 1 billion years, according to a new study. (2021-02-11)

Combined bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire spell uncertain future for forests
Bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire alone are not a death sentence for Colorado's beloved forests--but when combined, their toll may become more permanent, shows new research from the University of Colorado Boulder. (2021-02-08)

Global warming found to be culprit for flood risk in Peruvian Andes, other glacial lakes
Human-caused warming is responsible for increasing the risk of a glacial outburst flood from Peru's Lake Palcacocha, threatening the city below. This study is the first to directly link climate change with the risk of flooding from glacial lakes, which are growing in number and size worldwide. (2021-02-04)

Stimulant-associated deaths in US
Researchers looked at changes in the rate of deaths associated with the use of illicit (such as cocaine) and medical  stimulants in the United States from 2010 to 2017. (2021-02-01)

Thick lithosphere casts doubt on plate tectonics in Venus's geologically recent past
A study of a giant impact crater on Venus suggests that its lithosphere was too thick to have had Earth-like plate tectonics, at least for much of the past billion years. (2021-01-28)

Global ice loss increases at record rate
The rate at which ice is disappearing across the planet is speeding up, according to new research. And the findings also reveal that the Earth lost 28 trillion tonnes of ice between 1994 and 2017 - equivalent to a sheet of ice 100 metres thick covering the whole of the UK. (2021-01-25)

Energy spent avoiding humans associated with smaller home ranges for male pumas
New research shows that fear of humans causes mountain lions to increase their energy expenditures as they move through the landscape, and this can ultimately limit the size of the home ranges they're able to maintain. (2021-01-25)

Rediscovery of the 'extinct' Pinatubo volcano mouse
When Mount Pinatubo exploded in 1990, the surrounding Philippine ecosystem was devastated. Scientists thought that the Pinatubo volcano mouse that lived there went extinct. But researchers just discovered the volcano mouse alive and well. (2021-01-22)

Micro-climate moulds and reshapes northern insect communities, herbivory and predation
Climate and changes in it have direct impacts on species of plant and animals - but climate may also shape more complex biological systems like food webs. Now a research group from the University of Helsinki has investigated how micro-climate shapes each level of the ecosystem, from species' abundances in predator communities to parasitism rates in key herbivores, and ultimately to damage suffered by plants. The results reveal how climate change may drastically reshape northern ecosystems. (2021-01-14)

Study find physical weathering of rock breakdown more important than previously recognized
Anisovolumetric weathering is much more common than previously thought, and variations in this process can be explained by climate and erosion. (2021-01-13)

Scientists discover new 'spectacular' bat from West Africa
A group of scientists led by the American Museum of Natural History and Bat Conservation International have discovered a new species of a striking orange and black bat in a mountain range in West Africa. The species, which the researchers expect is likely critically endangered, underscores the importance of sub-Saharan 'sky islands' to bat diversity. The species is described today in the journal American Museum Novitates. (2021-01-13)

Archaeologists from Kuzbass created a 3D model of a part of the Tepsei archaeological site
The scientists worked in cooperation with specialists from the RSSDA laboratory (Moscow). Together, they completed a 3D virtual model of one of the clusters. (2020-12-24)

Study published on the well-being of small business workers during COVID-19
This study, published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, examined whether safety and health climates were related to employee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic in a sample of small businesses. (2020-12-21)

When absolute certainty may not be possible: Criteria to determine death by mountain rescue teams
The International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine (ICAR MedCom) convened an expert medical panel to develop evidence-based criteria that allow for accurate determination of death in mountain rescue situations. These recommendations appear in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, published by Elsevier. (2020-12-14)

Last Interglacial: warming amplified in mountain environments
Speleothems turned out to be a great stroke of luck: dripstones from two caves in the Swiss Alps provide for the first time a continuous reconstruction of temperatures during the Last Interglacial period. Paul Wilcox from the Department of Geology has now published a study showing that high alpine regions were affected by stronger temperature increases than lower altitudes. (2020-12-11)

Brains work harder while processing descriptions of motion in other languages
Different languages describe motion differently, according to distinct lexical rules. And though we may not consciously notice those rules, we follow them -- and Georgia State researchers have found they affect how our brains perceive and process descriptions of physical movement. (2020-12-09)

Colorado mountains bouncing back from 'acid rain' impacts
Niwot Ridge in the Rocky Mountains is slowly recovering from increased acidity caused by vehicle emissions in Colorado's Front Range, suggesting that alpine regions across the Mountain West may be recovering. This is good news for the wildlife and wildflowers of Rocky Mountain National Park and for water sources that supply the Front Range and the Mountain West. (2020-12-08)

The natural 'Himalayan aerosol factory' can affect climate
Large amounts of new particles can form in the valleys of the Himalayas from naturally emitted gases and can be transported to high altitudes by the mountain winds and injected into the upper atmosphere. (2020-12-07)

Preschool children can't see the mountains for the cat
Imagine seeing an image of a cat in front of a wide scene of mountains and being told just to remember the mountains if you saw them in a later picture. As an adult, that's not hard to do. But a new study shows that, even when told to pay attention to the mountain, preschool children focus so much on the cat that they won't later recognize the same mountain. (2020-11-30)

There are microplastics near the top of Mount Everest too
Researchers analyzing snow and stream samples from the National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition have found evidence of microplastic pollution on Mount Everest. While the highest concentrations of microplastics were around Base Camp where hikers and trekkers spend the most time, the team also found microplastics as high up as 8,440 meters above sea level, just below the summit. The findings appear November 20 in the journal One Earth. (2020-11-20)

Microplastics in the death zone
Researchers from the University of Plymouth's International Marine Litter Research Unit have identified the highest recorded microplastics ever found on Earth - at an altitude of more than 8,000 metres, close to the summit of Mount Everest. (2020-11-20)

Scientists find Ebola virus antibodies in people before 2018 DRC outbreak
Scientists found antibodies to Ebola virus in people up to a year before the 2018 Ebola virus disease outbreak began in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC. This suggests that either early cases may have been missed or that exposure occurs more commonly than previously thought, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. (2020-11-04)

Violent encounters between gorillas slow population growth rate
A new study by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund and UC Davis used five decades of data to show how social behavior explains fluctuations in the growth rate of a subpopulation of mountain gorillas. The researchers found that as gorilla group density increases, violent encounters between groups occur more frequently. As a result, infant mortality has increased dramatically, causing the population growth to slow down significantly in recent years. (2020-11-04)

Mountain gorillas are good neighbours - up to a point
Mountain gorilla groups are friendly to familiar neighbours - provided they stay out of ''core'' parts of their territory - new research shows. (2020-10-28)

Climate change drives plants to extinction in the Black Forest in Germany, study finds
Climate change is leaving its mark on the bog complexes of the German Black Forest. Due to rising temperatures and longer dry periods, two plant species have gone extinct over the last 40 years. The populations of many others have decreased by one third. According to a new study by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), more species could become extinct in the next couple of decades. (2020-10-28)

The effects of wildfires and spruce beetle outbreaks on forest temperatures
Results from a study published in the Journal of Biogeography indicate that wildfires may play a role in accelerating climate-driven species changes in mountain forests by compounding regional warming trends. (2020-10-21)

How rain can move mountains
Scientists have long thought that rainfall has a dramatic effect on the evolution of mountainous landscapes, but the reasons for how and why have been elusive. This seemingly logical concept has never been quantitatively demonstrated until now, thanks to a new technique that captures precisely how even the mightiest of mountain ranges -- the Himalaya -- bends to the will of raindrops. (2020-10-19)

Molecular mechanism of cross-species transmission of primate lentiviruses
A research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) showed that gorilla APOBEC3G potentially plays a role in inhibiting SIVcpz replication. Intriguingly, the research group demonstrated that an amino acid substitution in SIVcpz Vif, M16E, is sufficient to overcome gorilla APOBEC3G-mediated restriction. (2020-10-07)

New shortcut enables faster creation of spin pattern in magnet
Physicists have discovered a much faster approach to create a pattern of spins in a magnet. This 'shortcut' opens a new chapter in topology research. Interestingly, this discovery also offers an additional method to achieve more efficient magnetic data storage. The research will be published on 5 October in Nature Materials. (2020-10-05)

Future climate changes in nature reserves
The Earth's nature reserves are set to be affected by future climate change in very different ways. Detailed local knowledge of climate change impacts can therefore make a significant contribution to the management of protected areas and the preservation of their ecological function. A study by the University of Bayreuth in the journal 'Diversity and Distributions' draws attention to this fact. It is based on climate forecasts for more than 130,000 nature reserves worldwide. (2020-10-02)

Primate brain size does not predict their intelligence
A research team from the German Primate Center has systematically investigated the cognitive abilities of lemurs, which have relatively small brains compared to other primates. Conducting systematic tests with identical methods revealed that cognitive abilities of lemurs hardly differ from those of monkeys and great apes. Instead, this study revealed that the relationship between brain size and cognitive abilities cannot be generalized and it provides new insights into the evolution of primates. (2020-09-25)

Camera traps show impact of recreational activity on wildlife
The COVID-19 pandemic has fired up interest in outdoor activities in our parks and forests. Now a new UBC study highlights the need to be mindful of how these activities may affect wildlife living in protected areas. All wildlife tended to avoid places that were recently visited by recreational users. And they avoided mountain bikers and motorized vehicles significantly more than they did hikers and horseback riders. (2020-09-24)

Island-building in Southeast Asia created Earth's northern ice sheets
Tectonic processes are thought to have triggered past ice ages, but how? A new analysis of mountain building in the maritime tropics of Southeast Asia attributes the last ice age, which reached a maximum 15,000 years ago, to increasing rock weathering in the rising island arc from Sumatra to New Guinea over the past 15 million years, with the first ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere appearing about 3 million years ago. (2020-09-23)

Jellyfish with your chips?
Jellyfish could replace fish and chips on a new sustainable takeaway menu to help keep threatened species off the plate. University of Queensland researchers found 92 endangered and 11 critically endangered species of seafood were caught in oceans around the world after analysing global industrial fishing records. (2020-09-21)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.