Current Movement Disorders News and Events

Current Movement Disorders News and Events, Movement Disorders News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
ALS neuron damage reversed with new compound
Scientists have identified the first compound that eliminates the ongoing degeneration of upper motor neurons that become diseased and are a key contributor to ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), a swift and fatal neurodegenerative disease that paralyzes its victims. In ALS, movement-initiating nerve cells in the brain and muscle-controlling nerve cells in the spinal cord die. After administering the new compound,, the diseased brain neurons stopped degenerating so much that they became similar to healthy control neurons after 60 days of treatment. (2021-02-23)

The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say scientists
Personality has been described in all sorts of animal species, from ants to apes. Some individuals are shy and sedentary, while others are bold and active. Now a new study published in Ecology and Evolution has revealed that the way a fish swims tells us a lot about its personality. (2021-02-23)

Physics of tumours: Cancer cells become fluidised and squeeze through tissue
Working with colleagues from Germany and the US, researchers at Leipzig University have achieved a breakthrough in research into how cancer cells spread. The team of biophysicists led by Professor Josef Alfons Käs, Steffen Grosser and Jürgen Lippoldt demonstrated for the first time how cells deform in order to move in dense tumour tissues and squeeze past neighbouring cells. They have now published their findings in 'Physical Review X'. (2021-02-18)

Clues for improving sleep in visually impaired athletes
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that approximately one-third of a group of visually impaired athletes had sleep disorders. A later wake-up time and stress regarding interpersonal relationships in competition activities were related to the rate of sleep disorders. Addressing these factors may be key in improving sleep quality in this population. (2021-02-14)

Wake-up call for neural stem cells
A brain enzyme activates dormant neural stem cells, revealing how defects in its gene could lead to neurodevelopmental disorders. (2021-02-11)

Brain activity can reveal the severity of autistic traits
A team of researchers from Russia and Israel applied a new algorithm to classify the severity of autistic personality traits by studying subjects' brain activity. The article 'Brief Report: Classification of Autistic Traits According to Brain Activity Recoded by fNIRS Using ε-Complexity Coefficients' is published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. (2021-02-11)

How cells recycle the machinery that drives their motility?
Research groups at University of Helsinki and Institut Jacques Monod, Paris, discovered a new molecular mechanism that promotes cell migration. The discovery sheds light on the mechanisms that drive uncontrolled movement of cancer cells, and also revises the 'text book view' of cell migration. (2021-02-09)

Starling success traced to rapid adaptation
Love them or hate them, there's no doubt the European Starling is a wildly successful bird. A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines this non-native species from the inside out to learn what exactly happened at the genetic level as the starling population exploded across North America? (2021-02-09)

Increased risk of dying from COVID for people with severe mental disorders
People with severe mental disorders have a significantly increased risk of dying from COVID-19. This has been shown in a new study from Umeå University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Among the elderly, the proportion of deaths due to COVID-19 was almost fourfold for those with severe mental disorders compared to non-mentally ill people in the same age. (2021-02-03)

Smartwatch sensors enable remote monitoring & treatment guidance for Parkinson's patients
Scientists have developed a monitoring system based on commercial smartwatches that can detect movement issues and tremors in patients with Parkinson's disease. (2021-02-03)

Geisinger-GeneDx research identifies frequent genetic causes of cerebral palsy
Researchers have discovered a strong link between genetic changes known to cause neurodevelopmental disabilities and cerebral palsy, further debunking birth asphyxia as its major cause. (2021-02-02)

Unraveling the mystery of Gao, a protein implicated in movement disorders
Scientists at Scripps Research have clarified the workings of a mysterious protein called Gao, which is one of the most abundant proteins in the brain and, when mutated, causes severe movement disorders. (2021-02-02)

Human activity forces animals to move 70% further to survive
Scientists have analysed for the first time the amount by which human activity forces animals to alter their movements. What's surprising is that episodic activity - like hunting, oil pipeline construction, military manoeuvres - seem to have the biggest impact. (2021-02-01)

New realm of personalized medicine with brain stimulation
Millions of patients suffering from neurological and mental disorders such as depression, addiction, and chronic pain are treatment-resistant. New research paves the way for a promising alternative: personalized deep brain stimulation. Researchers have found a way to predict what effect electrical stimulation will have on an individual's brain activity across multiple brain regions. The work represents a major step forward in achieving new therapies for a whole host of neurological and mental disorders. (2021-02-01)

Researchers describe a molecular mechanism involved in the pathology's neurodegeneration
Protein alteration in the family of lamins causes several diseases, known as laminopathies, such as progeria or precocious ageing. A study in which UB researchers have taken part states that alterations in the levels of one of these proteins, lamin B1, contribute to the degeneration of neuronal populations in Huntington's disease. Caused by a mutation in the huntingtin gen, this pathology features involuntary movements, cognitive deficit and psychiatric disorders, and has no cure yet. (2021-02-01)

BU researchers identify promising therapeutic agent against melanoma
There have been great advances in treating melanoma over the past five years, however, even with these treatments many patients quickly develop drug resistance and die from their disease. A new study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has discovered that a drug (YK-4-279) that was previously created to target one specific type of protein has much broader use against a family of proteins that act to promote melanoma. (2021-02-01)

UMass Amherst researchers discover materials capable of self-propulsion
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have discovered how to make materials that snap and reset themselves, only relying upon energy flow from their environment. The discovery may prove useful for various industries that want to source movement sustainably, from toys to robotics, and is expected to further inform our understanding of how the natural world fuels some types of movement. (2021-02-01)

Threads that sense how and when you move? New technology makes it possible
Engineers have developed a thread-based sensor capable of monitoring the direction, angle of rotation and degree of displacement of the head. The design is a proof of principle that could be extended to measuring movements of other limbs by sensors attached like tatoos to the skin. (2021-01-29)

Sleep disorders: Patients often underestimate their total sleep time
People with sleep disorders commonly have a misperception about their actual sleep behaviour. A research group from MedUni Vienna's Department of Neurology analysed polysomnography results to identify the types of sleep disorder that are associated with a discrepancy between self-reported and objective sleep parameters and whether there are any factors that influence this. The main finding: irrespective of age, gender or screening setting, insomnia patients are most likely to underestimate how long they sleep. (2021-01-28)

Genetic analysis of symptoms yields new insights into PTSD
A new study led by researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) uncovers intriguing genetic similarities between PTSD and other mental health disorders such as anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The findings also suggest that existing drugs commonly used for other disorders might be modified to help treat individual symptoms of multiple disorders. (2021-01-28)

Scientists improved eye tracking technology in VR systems
The tracking of eye movement is one of the key elements of virtual and amplified reality technologies (VR/AR). A team from MSU together with a professor from RUDN University developed a mathematical model that helps accurately predict the next gaze fixation point and reduces the inaccuracy caused by blinking. The model would make VR/AR systems more realistic and sensitive to user actions. (2021-01-22)

Screening tool may help diagnose mental disorders in early pregnancy
A recent study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica found that questions typically asked to new mothers to screen for depression after giving birth can also help to detect depressive symptoms and other mental disorders during early pregnancy. (2021-01-21)

Eye tests predict Parkinson's-linked cognitive decline 18 months ahead
Simple vision tests can predict which people with Parkinson's disease will develop cognitive impairment and possible dementia 18 months later, according to a new study by UCL researchers. In a related study, the researchers also found that structural and functional connections of brain regions become decoupled throughout the entire brain in people with Parkinson's disease, particularly among people with vision problems. (2021-01-19)

Different types of neurons interact to make reaching-and-grasping tasks possible
Picking up that cup of coffee? New research from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University finds that one type of neuron is necessary for the early part of the movement, another for aiming for the cup. (2021-01-19)

Increased blood flow during sleep tied to critical brain function
Our brains experience significant changes in blood flow and neural activity during sleep, according to Penn State researchers. Such changes may help to clean out metabolic brain waste that builds up during the day. (2021-01-18)

Increased risk of Parkinson's disease in patients with schizophrenia
A new study conducted at the University of Turku, Finland, shows that patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder have an increased risk of Parkinson's disease later in life. The increased risk may be due to alterations in the brain's dopamine system caused by dopamine receptor antagonists or neurobiological effects of schizophrenia. (2021-01-15)

Effects of head trauma from intimate partner violence largely unrecognized
Carrie Esopenko, assistant professor at the Rutgers School of Health Professions, speaks on new international effort to understand ramifications of concussions and head and neck injuries sustained due to intimate partner violence. (2021-01-14)

How the brain paralyzes you while you sleep
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have discovered a group of neurons in the mouse brainstem that control muscle tone. Inhibiting these neuronal cells caused mice to move during REM sleep, reminiscent of REM sleep behavior disorders. These neurons were also responsible for episodes of cataplexy in a mouse model of narcolepsy; inhibiting them reduced the number of cataplexic bouts. These circuits could thus be a new target for treating these sleep disorders. (2021-01-14)

NYUAD study finds fragmented sleep patterns can predict vulnerability to chronic stress
New research from NYU Abu Dhabi's Laboratory of Neural Systems and Behavior for the first time used an animal model to demonstrate how abnormal sleep architecture can be a predictor of stress vulnerability. These important findings have the potential to inform the development of sleep tests that can help identify who may be susceptible -- or resilient -- to future stress. (2021-01-12)

Tapping the brain to boost stroke rehabilitation
Stroke survivors who had ceased to benefit from conventional rehabilitation gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients' own brains. (2021-01-12)

Faulty metabolism of Parkinson's medication in the brain linked to severe side effects
Until now, the reason why the drug levodopa (L-Dopa), which reduces the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, declines in efficacy after a few years' use has been unknown. A side effect that then often occur is involuntary movements. A Swedish-French collaboration, led from Uppsala University, has now been able to connect the problems with defective metabolism of L-Dopa in the brain. The study is published in Science Advances. (2021-01-07)

Large transporter protein linked to schizophrenia
Scientists have suspected mutations in a cellular cholesterol transport protein are associated with psychiatric disorders, but have found it difficult to prove this and to pinpoint how it happens. Now, Kazumitsu Ueda of Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and colleagues in Japan have provided evidence that mice with disrupted ABCA13 protein demonstrate a hallmark behaviour of schizophrenia. The team investigated ABCA13's functions and published their findings in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (2020-12-29)

Maternal Immune Activation Induces Sustained Changes in Fetal Microglia Motility
Researchers at the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine have revealed that alterations in fetal microglia resulting from maternal inflammation could contribute towards the onset of developmental and psychiatric disorders. These results can help clarify how changes in microglial process motility affect the development of the neural network, thus contributing towards the treatment of these disorders. (2020-12-22)

Targeted brain stimulation dulls social pain
Pairing brain stimulation with an emotion management technique blunts negative emotions, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. The combination may improve emotional regulation in people with psychiatric disorders. (2020-12-21)

Deep, slow-slip action may direct largest earthquakes and their tsunamis
Megathrust earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis that originate in subduction zones like Cascadia -- Vancouver Island, Canada, to northern California -- are some of the most severe natural disasters in the world. Now a team of geoscientists thinks the key to understanding some of these destructive events may lie in the deep, gradual slow-slip behaviors beneath the subduction zones. This information might help in planning for future earthquakes in the area. (2020-12-21)

Researchers discover brain pattern that could improve mental health disorder diagnosis
A pattern in how the brain breaks down tryptophan, a common amino acid consumed through food, was discovered by researchers at UTHealth. (2020-12-17)

Connections determine everything
A team of scientists, with the first author from the HSE University, were investigating which factors are the most important for the upper limb motor recovery after a stroke. The study is published in Stroke, the world's leading journal for cerebrovascular pathology. (2020-12-16)

Gut microbiota plays a role in brain function and mood regulation
Depression is a mental disorder that affects more than 264 million people of all ages worldwide. Understanding its mechanisms is vital for the development of effective therapeutic strategies. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm and the CNRS recently conducted a study showing that an imbalance in the gut bacterial community can cause a reduction in some metabolites, resulting in depressive-like behaviors. These findings, which show that a healthy gut microbiota contributes to normal brain function, were published in Nature Communications on December 11, 2020. (2020-12-11)

Reactive Video playback that you control with your body
An international team of researchers from Lancaster University, Stanford University and FXPAL, have created a system that dynamically adapts to mirror the position of the viewer's body and matches the speed of video playback to the viewer's movements. (2020-12-10)

Psychiatric disorders explain increased risk for self-harm in autism spectrum disorders
A population-based study revealed reasons behind elevated suicide risk, attempted suicides, and other self-harm, which require special health care, among adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders. Comorbid disorders, especially non-affective psychoses and affective and anxiety disorders, explained the risk. (2020-12-10)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.