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Current Movement Disorders News and Events, Movement Disorders News Articles.
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Five-minute EEG recordings: a key to the symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Pathological changes related to the disability of Parkinson's patients can already be detected in signals from the scalp without the need to open the skull. Researchers from Leipzig University Hospital and the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences recently published these new findings in the journal Brain. (2020-12-09)

Brains work harder while processing descriptions of motion in other languages
Different languages describe motion differently, according to distinct lexical rules. And though we may not consciously notice those rules, we follow them -- and Georgia State researchers have found they affect how our brains perceive and process descriptions of physical movement. (2020-12-09)

Shining a light on the weird world of dihydrogen phosphate anions
UNSW scientists show that dihydrogen phosphate anions actually bind to one another when their negative charges suggest they shouldn't. (2020-12-07)

Grasping an object - model describes complete movement planning in the brain
Neurobiologists at the German Primate Center developed a model that for the first time can completely represent the neuronal processes from seeing to grasping an object. (2020-12-07)

Immunity passports: Ethical conflict and opportunity
Ikerbasque Research Professor Iñigo de Miguel Beriain, who works with the UPV/EHU Chair in Law and the Human Genome, defends the usefulness of immunity passports, providing they are used to protect the rights of those who are immune. He also warns that vaccine distribution will create similar problems related to immunity-based licenses. (2020-12-04)

A new view of how the brain decides to make an effort
Nature Human Behavior published the research by scientists at Emory University. It gives the first detailed view of ventral striatum activity during three phases of effort-based decision-making -- the anticipation of initiating an effort, the actual execution of the effort and the reward, or outcome, of the effort. (2020-12-03)

'Message in a bottle' tracks plastic pollution
Electronic tags released in the Ganges river show plastic pollution can travel thousands of kilometres in just a few months. (2020-12-02)

Cancer cells 'remove blindfold' to spread
Cells are effectively 'blindfolded' as they lose sensitivity to their surroundings early in cancer progression, but scientists used a new method to find some cancer cells are able to switch this sense back on in order to move and spread. In future, these cells could potentially be targeted by treatments before cancer spreads to give patients a better chance of recovery. (2020-12-01)

Microswimmers move like moths to the light
The Freigeist group at TU Dresden, led by chemist Dr Juliane Simmchen, has studied an impressive behavior of synthetic microswimmers: as soon as the photocatalytic particles leave an illuminated zone, they flip independently and swim back into the light. This promising observation and its analysis was recently published in the scientific journal ''Soft Matter'' as an ''Emerging Investigator'' article. (2020-11-26)

What do slight arm movements reveal about our breathing and health?
Special activity trackers can be used to fairly accurately determine the respiratory rate of people while they sleep. This is the result of a new study conducted by researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) together with Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and published in the journal Scientific Reports. In the future, activity trackers could be used to detect the early stages of a disease, as a person's respiratory rate can indicate signs of an undetected medical problem. (2020-11-23)

Newfound ability to change baby brain activity could lead to rehabilitation for injured brains
Researchers from King's College London have identified the brain activity for the first time in a newborn baby when they are learning an association between different types of sensory experiences. Using advanced MRI scanning techniques and robotics, the researchers found that a baby's brain activity can be changed through these associations, shedding new light on the possibility of rehabilitating babies with injured brains and promoting the development of life-long skills such as speech, language and movement. (2020-11-23)

How moving slower allows groups of bacteria to spread across surfaces
Scientists have found that bacterial groups spread more rapidly over surfaces when the individuals inside them move slowly, a discovery that may shed light on how bacteria spread within the body during infections. (2020-11-23)

Risk of mental disorders later in life potentially higher in kids of low-income families
The results gained in a study involving approximately one million Danish children increase the understanding of how socio-economic differences in childhood affect the development of mental disorders in the Nordic countries. (2020-11-20)

Sexual minorities, especially women, who misuse substances more likely to have psychiatric disorders
More than half of lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals who misuse alcohol or tobacco also have a co-occurring psychiatric disorder, compared to one-third of heterosexuals, a new University of Michigan study finds. (2020-11-20)

Memories create 'fingerprints' that reveal how the brain is organized
While the broad architecture and organization of the human brain is universal, new research shows how the differences between how people reimagine common scenarios can be observed in brain activity and quantified. These unique neurological signatures could ultimately be used to understand, study, and even improve treatment of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. (2020-11-20)

New non-invasive technology could spot early signs of motor disorders in babies
Imperial College London scientists have created the world's first non-invasive way to map how baby movements are generated on a neuronal level. (2020-11-20)

New understanding of mobility paves way for tomorrow's transport systems
Researchers at DTU and the University of Copenhagen have developed a ground-breaking model that provides a completely new understanding of our movement patterns. The model can come to play an important role when designing tomorrow's green modes of transport and has just been published in Nature. (2020-11-18)

In a pandemic, migration away from dense cities more effective than closing borders
During the COVID-19 pandemic, closing national borders and borders between states and regions has been prevalent. But does it help? In a paper in Chaos, researchers decided to put this hypothesis to the test and discover if confinement and travels bans are really effective ways to limit the spread of a pandemic disease. Specifically, they focused on the movement of people from larger cities to smaller ones and tested the results of this one-way migration. (2020-11-17)

Study explores sleep apnea, autoimmune disease link
New research by University of Georgia scientists sheds light on why people with obstructive sleep apnea may have associated autoimmune disorders. The results could lead to better approaches to treatment and possibly new drug therapies. (2020-11-17)

Holes in Greenland ice sheet are larger than previously thought, study finds
Expedition finds that holes in the Greenland ice sheet, called moulins, are much larger than previously thought. (2020-11-17)

In Europe, climate change counter movement think tanks are conservative and neoliberal
They follow similar patterns to those found in the US, according to a study of which Núria Almiron, a researcher at the Department of Communication, is the first author, carried out in collaboration with researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder (USA) and the International University of Catalonia within the framework of the THINKClima project. (2020-11-12)

Machine learning algorithm could provide Soldiers feedback
A new machine learning algorithm, developed with Army funding, can isolate patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior and then decode it, potentially providing Soldiers with behavioral-based feedback. (2020-11-12)

Novel population of neurons identified that control binocular eye movements in 3D space
Researchers have discovered a previously undescribed population of neurons called saccade-vergence burst neurons that help control our eyes as they view in three-dimensional space. Models had predicted the existence of such neurons. The neurons are in a region of the mid-brain called the central mesencephalic reticular formation. (2020-11-11)

New airflow videos show why masks with exhalation valves do not slow the spread of COVID
Using high-speed video and schlieren imaging, NIST researcher Matthew Staymates created videos that show how air flows through masks with and without exhalation valves. 'When you compare the videos side by side, the difference is striking,' Staymates said. 'These videos show how the valves allow air to leave the mask without filtering it, which defeats the purpose of the mask.' (2020-11-10)

Concurrent sharing of an avatar body by two individuals in virtual reality
Two participants were embodied within a shared avatar in virtual reality. Movements of the shared avatar were the average of the participants' movements. They were asked to reach a target via the shared body. In the results, avatar's hand movements were straighter and less jerky than those of the participants. Thus, humans prioritize the movement of a shared body over their own movements. A shared body can be a new collaboration method in the future. (2020-11-10)

Optogenetic stimulation improves alterations in Huntington's disease experimental models
A study led by researchers of the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) has characterized one of the neuronal circuits involved in the development of the Huntington's disease. The study, published in the journal eLife, shows in an animal model with the pathology, that optogenetic stimulation of the circuit causes improvements in the typical symptomatology of the disease. (2020-11-10)

Group size and makeup affect how social birds move together
Scientists have shown that the size and makeup of groups of social birds can predict how efficiently they use and move through their habitat, according to new findings published today in eLife. (2020-11-10)

Keep the data coming
A continuous data supply ensures data-intensive simulations can run at maximum speed. (2020-11-09)

Researchers isolate and decode brain signal patterns for specific behaviors
A standing challenge has been isolating patterns in brain signals that relate to a specific behavior, such as finger movements. Researchers have developed a machine learning algorithm that resolved this challenge by uncovering neural patterns missed by other methods. This could both enable new neuroscience discoveries and enhance future brain-machine interfaces. (2020-11-09)

UM research essential to global arctic animal migration archive
Now, scientists can track the movements of thousands of Arctic and sub-Arctic animals over three decades with the new global Arctic Animal Movement Archive. (2020-11-06)

Tokyo's voluntary standstill may have stopped COVID-19 in its tracks
Research shows that Japan's noncompulsory state of emergency generally succeeded in reducing human movement. A study from The University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science used mobile phone location data for January-April 2020 to record and plot movement of people in metro Tokyo during the emergence and first wave of COVID-19. They found a movement reduction of over 50%, which in turn limited social contact and slowed infection spread. (2020-11-05)

Ecological "big-data" reveals insights into a changing arctic
The Arctic Animal Movement Archive (AAMA) - a new ecological dataset, which combines three decades of animal tracking studies from across the Arctic - provides a powerful new ecological tool to understand the rapidly changing region better. (2020-11-05)

Archive of animal migration in the Arctic
A global archive with movement data collected across three decades logs changes in the behaviour of Arctic animals (2020-11-05)

How to fix the movement for fossil fuel divestment
Bankers and environmentalists alike are increasingly calling for capital markets to play a bigger role in the war on carbon. In the absence of a meaningful global price on carbon, however, capital continues to flow freely toward fossil fuels and other carbon-intensive industries. The movement for fossil fuel divestment has been trying since 2012 to reverse this trend. (2020-11-03)

Study finds 5 distinct dog types from 11,000 years ago
An international team of researchers that includes a Texas A&M University professor has studied the lineage of dogs and found that there were at least five different types of dogs as far back as 11,000 years ago. (2020-10-29)

Research lowers errors for using brain signals to control a robot arm
Brain-computer interfaces have seen a large influx of research in an effort to allow precise and accurate control of physical systems. By measuring brain signals and implementing a clever feedback scheme, researchers from India and the UK have reduced the positional error in brain-controlled robot arms by a factor of 10, paving the way to greatly enhancing the quality of life for people suffering from strokes and neuro-muscular disorders. (2020-10-28)

Paediatrics: Antiepileptic drug exposure in pregnancy and neurodevelopmental disorder risk
Children born to mothers who took the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate during pregnancy may have a four to five-fold increased risk of developing neurodevelopmental disorders in early childhood, according to a study in Scientific Reports. Fifty of the 991 French children (5%) who were exposed to sodium valproate were diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders in their first five years, compared to 15,270 of 1,710,441 children (0.89%) not exposed to any antiepileptic drugs. (2020-10-22)

Findings shed light on the ancient origins of speed control during movement
Movement in animals is complex. Little has been known about how spinal inhibitory interneurons work to silence other neurons and related muscle groups in coordination with the active muscle groups across changing speeds. Now a Northwestern University research team has discovered in a study of zebrafish that there is a very orderly relationship between when these critical inhibitory neurons are born, their participation in different speeds of movement and what part of a motor neuron they innervate. (2020-10-22)

COVID-19 infection may be part of a 'perfect storm' for Parkinson's disease
Can COVID-19 infection increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease? That's the question posed by a new commentary published in the journal Trends in Neurosciences, which explores three known case studies of people developing Parkinson's-like symptoms in the weeks following infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. While rare, these cases provide important insights into potential long-term implications of infections. (2020-10-22)

Do black lives matter protests impact fatal police interactions and crime?
A new analysis of nine years of nationwide data examines the impacts of the Black Lives Matter movement on fatal interactions with police, and on crime and arrests. (2020-10-21)

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