Current Muscles News and Events

Current Muscles News and Events, Muscles News Articles.
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Credit card-sized soft pumps power wearable artificial muscles
Robotic clothing that is entirely soft and could help people to move more easily is a step closer to reality thanks to the development of a new flexible and lightweight power system for soft robotics. (2021-02-17)

New surgery may enable better control of prosthetic limbs
MIT researchers in collaboration with surgeons at Harvard Medical School have devised a new type of amputation surgery that can help amputees better control their residual muscles and receive sensory feedback. This restored sense of proprioception should translate to better control of prosthetic limbs, as well as reduction of limb pain, the researchers say. (2021-02-15)

Can a fin become a limb?
Researchers at Harvard and Boston Children's Hospital examine what's happening at genetic level to drive patterns in fin skeleton versus limb skeleton and find mutants with modified fins in a more limb-like pattern by adding new bones, complete with muscles and joints. The results reveal the ability to form limb-like structures was present in the common ancestor of tetrapods and teleost fishes and has been retained in a latent state which can be activated by genetic changes. (2021-02-04)

New clues to how muscle wasting occurs in people with cancer
Muscle wasting, or the loss of muscle tissue, is a common problem for people with cancer, but the precise mechanisms have long eluded doctors and scientists. Now, a new study led by Penn State researchers gives new clues to how muscle wasting happens on a cellular level. (2021-02-03)

With new design, stretchable electronics perform better under strain
Researchers have created stretchable electronics that are less compromised by deformation. They also created several circuit elements with the design, which could lead to even more types of stretchable electronics. (2021-01-25)

Exercising muscle combats chronic inflammation on its own
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that human muscle has an innate ability to ward off damaging effects of chronic inflammation when exercised. The discovery was made possible through the use of lab-grown, engineered human muscle, demonstrating the potential power of the first-of-its-kind platform in such research endeavors. (2021-01-22)

From fins to limbs
In a new study an international team of researchers examined three-dimensional digital models of the bones, joints, and muscles of the fins and limbs of two extinct early tetrapods and a closely related fossil fish and discover these early tetrapods had a very distinct pattern of muscle leverage that didn't look like a fish fin or modern tetrapod limbs and their limbs were more adapted for propulsion rather than weight bearing. (2021-01-22)

NAD+ can restore age-related muscle deterioration
Scientists at EPFL have discovered that Alzheimer's-like protein aggregates underly the muscle deterioration seen in aging. But the aggregates can be reversed by boosting the levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), which turns on the defense systems of mitochondria in cells and restores muscle function. (2021-01-19)

Designer cytokine makes paralyzed mice walk again
To date, paralysis resulting from spinal cord damage has been irreparable. With a new therapeutic approach, scientists from the Department for Cell Physiology at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) headed by Professor Dietmar Fischer have succeeded for the first time in getting paralyzed mice to walk again. The keys to this are the protein hyper-interleukin-6, which stimulates nerve cells to regenerate, and the way how it is supplied to the animals. (2021-01-15)

How the brain paralyzes you while you sleep
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have discovered a group of neurons in the mouse brainstem that control muscle tone. Inhibiting these neuronal cells caused mice to move during REM sleep, reminiscent of REM sleep behavior disorders. These neurons were also responsible for episodes of cataplexy in a mouse model of narcolepsy; inhibiting them reduced the number of cataplexic bouts. These circuits could thus be a new target for treating these sleep disorders. (2021-01-14)

How insects activate muscles to adapt to limbs removed
Adaptability explains why insects spread so widely and why they are the most abundant animal group on earth. Insects exhibit resilient and flexible locomotion, even with drastic changes in their body structure such as losing a limb. (2021-01-14)

Neuronal circuits for fine motor skills
Writing, driving a screw or throwing darts are only some of the activities that demand a high level of skill. How the brain masters such exquisite movements has now been described in the journal ''Nature'' by a team of researchers at the University of Basel and the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research. A map of brainstem circuits reveals which neurons control the fine motor skills of the arm and hand. (2021-01-06)

Not just a guys' club: Resistance training benefits older women just as much as older men
Sure, everything might come down to sex - but not when strength training is concerned. (2021-01-06)

"The machine as extension of the body"
Combining neuroscience and robotic research has gained impressive results in the rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. A research team led by Prof. Gordon Cheng from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) was able to show that exoskeleton training not only helped patients to walk, but also stimulated their healing process. With these findings in mind, Prof. Cheng wants to take the fusion of robotics and neuroscience to the next level. (2020-12-11)

Blocking protein restores strength, endurance in old mice, Stanford study finds
A single protein is a master regulator of mouse muscle function during aging, a Stanford study finds. Blocking this protein increased muscle strength and endurance in old animals. It may play a role in age-related muscle weakening in humans. (2020-12-10)

Grasping an object - model describes complete movement planning in the brain
Neurobiologists at the German Primate Center developed a model that for the first time can completely represent the neuronal processes from seeing to grasping an object. (2020-12-07)

Study details how aerobic exercise reverses degenerative process that leads to metabolic diseases
Experiments with mice and humans showed that exercise training increased the expression in adipose tissue of a key enzyme for the organism's metabolic health, combating the harmful effects of aging and obesity (2020-12-07)

Scientists identify new genetic MND risk factor in junk DNA
Researchers from the University of Sheffield have identified a new genetic risk factor for Motor Neurone Disease (MND). (2020-12-01)

Getting a grip on better health
Men with muscles like a young Arnold Schwarzenegger look powerful but a handshake will give away whether they're a healthy specimen - or at risk of a chronic disease or premature ageing, experts say. Medical researchers in South Australia assessed more than 600 men aged over 40 to 88 years in the Men, Androgen, Inflammation, Lifestyle, Environment, and Stress (MAILES) study to measure the link between sleep apnea and muscle mass with grip strength. (2020-11-29)

Age not just a number: Causes of joint stiffness differ between older and younger adults
As people age, joints become less flexible, causing balance problems that lower quality of life. Dr. Kosuke Hirata, Mr. Ryosuke Yamadera, and Prof. Ryota Akagi from the Shibaura Institute of Technology revealed that among younger adults, muscle but not nerve stiffness is associated with the ankle's range of motion (ROM), whereas only nerve stiffness is linked to ankle ROM among older adults. In other words, non-muscle tissue becomes more important for joint flexibility with age. (2020-11-25)

Minimal waste production is a fundamental law for animal locomotion
Is there a unifying principle underpinning animal locomotion in its rich diversity? The thermodynamic analysis shows why and how waste minimization prevails on efficiency or power maximization when it comes to free locomotion irrespective of the available mode and gaits. (2020-11-25)

Trinity researchers discover how the brain 're-wires' after disease
Trinity College researchers are studying how the brain re-wires itself in neurological disease. The team is building treatments for today's more common global conditions like Motor Neurone Disease (MND/ALS) and Spinal Muscular Atrophy and their findings could impact rehabilitation for patients, the discovery of effective drugs and quantifying the potential efficacy of new therapies. (2020-11-24)

Rhythm and bleughs: changes in our stomach's rhythms steer us away from disgusting sights
Does the sight of maggots squirming in rotten food make you look away in disgust? The phrase 'makes my stomach turn' takes on a new meaning today as researchers at the University of Cambridge reveal that changes in the rhythm of our stomachs prompt us to look away from disgusting images. (2020-11-24)

Bite-size view of brain space
A new study adds another layer to the remarkable evolutionary transition of life from water to land on Earth. The international study of the prehistoric 'relic' tetrapods, including salamander and lobe-finned lungfish and coelacanths, adds another perspective to the evolution of other four-legged land animals, including related animals such as frogs and reptiles which live in both terrestrial and aqueous environments. (2020-11-21)

New non-invasive technology could spot early signs of motor disorders in babies
Imperial College London scientists have created the world's first non-invasive way to map how baby movements are generated on a neuronal level. (2020-11-20)

Simple measurement could transform injury rehabilitation
Researchers from Edith Cowan University in Western Australia have found a simple way to analyse the effectiveness of exercise training that could one day be conducted easily at a local gym or physio. Using vertical jumps as a test activity, the researchers could predict detailed information regarding technique and muscle activation patterns just through a relatively simple analysis of forces produced against the ground during the jump. (2020-11-19)

The timeless, complimentary taste of oysters and champagne -- explained
Matching prices aren't the only reason oysters and champagne pair so well. According to a study published by the University of Copenhagen today, an uncanny umami synergy makes the combination of yeast-brewed bubbly and fresh molluscs a match made in heaven for some. Ironically, the new knowledge could help us consume more vegetables in the future. (2020-11-18)

Catapult-like hydrogel actuator designed to deliver high contraction power
Recently, inspired by muscle-powered accelerations in biological jumpers, ZHOU Feng's group from the Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics (LICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and HE Ximin's group from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) have designed an elastic-driven strong contractile hydrogel through storing and releasing elastic potential energy in polymer network. (2020-11-18)

Study reveals physical demands of two-hour marathon
Elite runners need a specific combination of physiological abilities to have any chance of running a sub-two-hour marathon, new research shows. (2020-11-13)

Atrophy can be combated by boosting expression of an enzyme produced in muscles
Study showed that targeted stimulation of PKA production promoted muscle growth and enhanced resistance to fatigue. (2020-11-06)

Low quantity and quality of muscle predicts poor outcomes in colon cancer surgery
New study suggests interventions to help patients build muscle before surgery may improve their outcomes (2020-10-27)

These two bird-sized dinosaurs evolved the ability to glide, but weren't great at it
Despite having bat-like wings, two small dinosaurs, Yi and Ambopteryx, struggled to fly, only managing to glide clumsily between the trees where they lived, researchers report October 22 in the journal iScience. Unable to compete with other tree-dwelling dinosaurs and early birds, they went extinct after just a few million years. The findings support that dinosaurs evolved flight in several different ways before modern birds evolved. (2020-10-22)

Scientists identify compound that stimulates muscle cells in mice
UCLA researchers have identified a compound that can reproduce the effect of exercise in muscle cells in mice. The findings are published in the journal Cell Reports Medicine. (2020-10-21)

Losing flight had huge benefits for ants, finds new study
Researchers have taken detailed scans of worker ants to examine the hypothesis that the loss of flight is directly connected to the evolution of strength. (2020-10-18)

'Less pain' to remove tonsils
A 10-year study from Flinders University has found ''shrinking'' tonsils results in far less pain and bleeding than a full tonsillectomy. The research paper, published this month in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery, looked at 608 children who underwent tonsil surgery between 2008 and 2018. (2020-10-13)

Primates aren't quite frogs
Researchers in Japan demonstrated for the first time the 'spinal motor module hypothesis' in the primate arm, wherein the brain recruits interneuronal modules in the spinal cord rather than individual muscles to create movement and different modules can be combined to create specific movements. (2020-10-12)

RTL1 gene a likely culprit behind temple and Kagami-Ogata syndromes
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that Rtl1, which is a mouse ortholog of the human RTL1 gene, appears to be the major gene responsible for muscle and placental defects in models of Temple and Kagami-Ogata syndromes, which are serious genetic conditions. Theirs is the first study to demonstrate that a domesticated gene that is specific to placental mammals plays an important role in fetal and neonatal muscle development. (2020-10-06)

Vanderbilt wearable exosuit that lessens muscle fatigue could redesign the future of work
Zelik and team demonstrate how a clothing-like exoskeleton can reduce back muscle fatigue and providing needed physical relief to material handlers, medical professionals and frontline workers. (2020-09-29)

Materials scientists learn how to make liquid crystal shape-shift
A new 3D-printing method will make it easier to manufacture and control the shape of soft robots, artificial muscles and wearable devices. Researchers at UC San Diego show that by controlling the printing temperature of liquid crystal elastomer, they can control the material's degree of stiffness and ability to contract--known as degree of actuation. What's more, they are able to change the stiffness of different areas in the same material by exposing it to heat. (2020-09-25)

Blood vessel growth in muscle is reduced in women after menopause
A new study from the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports demonstrates that formation of small blood vessels is impaired in the muscle tissue of postmenopausal women. The study's findings highlight the importance of physical activity for women prior to and during menopause, as a means to prevent the development of disease later in life. (2020-09-22)

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