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Current Muscles News and Events, Muscles News Articles.
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Exercise before menopause is important to optimise health in later years
The small blood vessels in muscles of women after menopause are less able to grow compared to young women, according to new research published today in the Journal of Physiology. This means exercising before menopause is all the more important for women in order to develop blood vessels in muscles, and thus the ability to develop muscle strength. (2020-09-22)

Time-restricted feeding improves health without altering the body's core clock
For the first time, scientists have studied the early effects of time-restricted feeding on the daily periodic oscillations of metabolites and genes in muscle, and metabolites in blood. The findings by scientists at the University of Copenhagen, the Australian Catholic University and Karolinska Institutet find that time-restricted feeding does not influence the muscle's core clock, and opens the door to more research on how these observed changes improve health. (2020-09-17)

Biomechanics: Wearing footwear with toe springs requires less muscle work
Wearing footwear with an upward curvature at the front of the shoe - known as the toe spring - requires less work from the muscles of the feet to walk than shoes with a flatter sole, according to an experimental study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-09-17)

Curve at tip of shoes eases movement but may lead to weaker muscles, problems
The scientists found that the more curved a toe spring is, the less power the foot inside the shoe has to exert when pushing off from the ground while walking. That means foot muscles are doing less work, and this, the researchers hypothesize, may have consequences such as less endurance and make people more susceptible to medical conditions like plantar fasciitis. (2020-09-17)

The acrobatic hydra shows off: How environmental cues can affect behavior
A duo from Columbia University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has begun to crack the neural code behind Hydra's simplest behavior, called contraction bursts. The team found that the concentration of dissolved particles in the surrounding water affects the activity of a neural circuit in one of Hydra's nerve nets, which can trigger a specific set of muscle cells to contract the torso. (2020-09-17)

Scientists uncover a novel approach to treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys, Fondazione Santa Lucia IRCCS, and Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore have shown that pharmacological (drug) correction of the content of extracellular vesicles released within dystrophic muscles can restore their ability to regenerate muscle and prevent muscle scarring. The study, published in EMBO Reports, reveals a promising new therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable muscle-wasting condition, and has far-reaching implications for the field of regenerative medicine. (2020-09-15)

New insight into how muscles and fat cells work together to make you more fit
Scientists in Denmark and Brazil find evidence of muscle and adipose cross-talk and gain new insight into the importance of adipose DICER in the adaptive response of muscle to exercise training (2020-09-14)

Botox for TMJ disorders may not lead to bone loss in the short term, but more research is needed
Botox injections to manage jaw and facial pain do not result in clinically significant changes in jaw bone when used short term and in low doses, according to researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. However, they found evidence of bone loss when higher doses were used. (2020-09-14)

CCNY engineer Xi Chen and partners create new shape-changing crystals
Imagine harnessing evaporation as a source of energy or developing next generation actuators and artificial muscles for a broad array of applications. These are the new possibilities with the creation by an international team of researchers, led by The City College of New York's Xi Chen and his co-authors at the CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, of shape-changing crystals that enable energy transfer from evaporation to mechanical motion. (2020-09-14)

Muscle aging: Stronger for longer
With life expectancy increasing, age-related diseases are also on the rise, including sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass due to aging. Researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum have demonstrated that a well-known drug can delay the progression of age-related muscle weakness. (2020-09-09)

Muscle weakness in patients in intensive care: Potential approach to treatment
Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM) has taken on a new relevance as a result of the Corona virus. CIM is the specialists' term for a muscle weakness which occurs in patients being treated in intensive care for a longer period of time. In a severe case of a Covid19 infection, for example, many patients need artificial ventilation. Researchers have now found a potential method of treating CIM. The results have been published in ''Nature Communications''. (2020-09-09)

Different response of mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue to endurance e
In obese individuals, endurance exercise improves fitness and increases the number of mitochondria * and cellular respiration in skeletal muscles. However, the intervention has no effect on cellular respiration in adipose tissue. This is the result of a study by DZD researchers that has now been published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-09-09)

African wild dogs have vestigial first digit and muscular adaptations for life on the run
African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) are known for their unique hunting style, often referred to as ''exhaustive predation'', in which they chase their prey to exhaustion, rather than hunting using speed, strength, or stealth. They are also unique among the dog clade in having only four full digits on their front paws. Until recently, it was unclear how these unique behavioral and anatomical features would affect their forelimb morphology. (2020-09-07)

Misfiring brain cells may cause swallowing woes in children with developmental disorders
Misfiring brain cells that control key parts of the mouth and tongue may be creating swallowing difficulties in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, according to neuroscientists with Virginia Tech and George Washington University. Problems ingesting, chewing, or swallowing food occur in up to 80 percent of children with developmental disorders and can lead to food aspiration, choking, or life-threatening respiratory infections. (2020-09-01)

Duchenne: "Crosstalk" between muscle and spleen
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common muscle disease in children and is passed on by X-linked recessive inheritance. Characteristic is a progressive muscular atrophy. The disease often results in death before the third decade of life. Researchers of the Universities of Maynooth (Ireland) and Bonn have found a connection between dystrophic muscles and the lymphatic system in mice with Duchenne disease. The results have now been published in the journal ''iScience''. (2020-08-27)

Tag team gut bacteria worsen symptoms of multiple sclerosis
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) have discovered that a particular combination of microorganisms in the gut can worsen symptoms in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. The study published in the scientific journal Nature shows that two specific gut bacteria enhance the activity of immune cells that attack the body's own brain and spinal cord. (2020-08-26)

Got fatigue? Study further pinpoints brain regions that may control it
Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine using MRI scans and computer modeling say they have further pinpointed areas of the human brain that regulate efforts to deal with fatigue. (2020-08-26)

Ocean hitchhiker's sucker mechanism offers potential for underwater adhesion
A new study has revealed how remora suckerfish detach themselves from the surfaces they've clung to - and how the mechanism could provide inspiration for future reversible underwater adhesion devices. The research, by an international, multidisciplinary team working across robotics, comparative biology, and electrical engineering, investigated the detachment mechanism of the remora's suction disc, and experimented with how it could be applied in underwater robots. (2020-08-24)

Migration and dispersal of butterflies have contrasting effect on flight morphology
Migration and dispersal are vastly different activities with very different benefits and risks. NCBS Grad student Vaishali Bhaumik and her advisor Dr Krushnamegh Kunte decided to investigate the effects of such activities on the morphology (form and structure) and reproduction of butterflies. (2020-08-19)

UAlberta researchers find way to speed up nerve regrowth for trauma patients
A University of Alberta researcher has found a treatment that increases the speed of nerve regeneration by three to five times, leading to much better outcomes for trauma surgery patients. (2020-08-19)

Ageing heart cells offer clues to susceptibility of older people to severe COVID-19
Genes that play an important role in allowing SARS-CoV-2 to invade heart cells become more active with age, according to research published today in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology. The findings could help explain why age is major risk factor for dying from COVID-19, with people over 70 years at greatest risk, and why the disease can cause heart complications in severe cases, including heart failure and inflammation of the heart. (2020-08-18)

When you're smiling, the whole world really does smile with you
From Sinatra to Katy Perry, celebrities have long sung about the power of a smile -- how it picks you up, changes your outlook, and generally makes you feel better. But is it all smoke and mirrors, or is there a scientific backing to the claim? Groundbreaking research from the University of South Australia confirms that the act of smiling can trick your mind into being more positive, simply by moving your facial muscles. (2020-08-13)

Brace yourself for these results
Researchers studying the mystery of why some weightlifters' muscles grow much more quickly than others' have found new answers through a novel experiment in which subjects worked out one leg and immobilized the other. (2020-08-04)

Study challenges idea that lower BMI shields smokers from fat-associated health risks
Some smokers might rationalize continuing to smoke because of lower body weight often associated with the habit. However, Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators have determined that even with a lower body mass index (BMI), smokers have a higher risk of depositing fat in and around organs and tissues compared to those who never smoked. (2020-07-27)

Hot or cold, venomous vipers still quick to strike
Most reptiles move slower when temperatures drop, but venomous rattlesnakes appear to be an exception. The cold affects them, but not as much as scientists expected. (2020-07-23)

Glowing worms provide live-action movies of the body's internal scaffolding
Duke researchers have made the first time-lapse movies of the sheet-like mesh that surrounds and supports most animal tissues. While the thin layer of extracellular matrix known as the basement membrane plays key roles in development and disease, visualizing it in living organisms has been difficult to do. The team says their work offers a new way to study basement membrane defects underlying aging, and diseases ranging from cancer to diabetes. (2020-07-08)

Soy and wheat proteins helpful for building aging muscles, but not as potent as animal protein
On a gram for gram basis, animal proteins are more effective than plant proteins in supporting the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass with advancing age, shows research presented this week at The Physiological Society's virtual early career conference Future Physiology 2020. (2020-07-07)

Our animal inheritance: Humans perk up their ears, too, when they hear interesting sounds
Many animals move their ears to better focus their attention on a novel sound. That humans also have this capability was not known until now. A research team now has demonstrated that we make minute, unconscious movements of our ears that are directed towards the sound want to focus our attention on. The team discovered this ability by measuring electrical signals in the muscles of the vestigial motor system in the human ear. The results have now been published in the journal 'eLife'. (2020-07-07)

Neurons show distinct styles as they interact with the same muscle partner
A study in the Journal of Neuroscience shows a newfound diversity in how cells talk to the muscle they innervate, revealing that the subclasses of neurons have distinct propensities for change, or 'plasticity'. (2020-07-07)

New link between calcium and cardiolipin in heart defects
To function properly, the heart needs energy from cells' powerhouses, the mitochondria. In turn, mitochondria boost their energy output when calcium levels rise around them, a signal that more energy is needed. A new study shows that a shortage of cardiolipin, a type of fat, in the mitochondrial membrane, prevents calcium from entering mitochondria. The result helps explain heart and muscle weakness in the rare genetic disorder Barth syndrome. (2020-07-07)

Scientists shed new light on how seabirds cruise through air and water
New insight on how four species of seabirds have developed the ability to cruise through both air and water has been published today in the open-access journal eLife. (2020-06-30)

Lifting weights makes your nervous system stronger, too
Gym-goers may get frustrated when they don't see results from weightlifting right away, but their efforts are not in vain: the first few weeks of training strengthen the nervous system, not muscles. New research published in JNeurosci reveals how. (2020-06-29)

New treatment for common form of muscular dystrophy shows promise in cells, animals
Researchers have designed a potential new treatment for one of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy, according to a new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Toshifumi Yokota, professor of medical genetics at the University of Alberta, led a team from Canada and the U.S. to create and test synthetic DNA-like molecules that interfere with the production of a toxic protein that destroys the muscles of people who have facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). (2020-06-29)

Receptor makes mice strong and slim
Increasing abdominal girth and shrinking muscles are two common side effects of aging. Researchers at the University of Bonn have discovered a receptor in mice that regulates both effects. Experiments with human cell cultures suggest that the corresponding signaling pathways might also exist in humans. The study, which also involved researchers from Spain, Finland, Belgium, Denmark and the USA, has now been published in the renowned journal Cell Metabolism. (2020-06-25)

Scientists devise new 'bar code' method to identify critical cell types in the brain
A discovery by researchers at Brown's Center for Translational Neuroscience could pave the way for future studies aimed at developing solutions to ALS and other vexing neuromuscular diseases. (2020-06-25)

Synthetic materials mimic living creatures
Researchers have developed a family of soft materials that imitates living creatures. When hit with light, the film-thin materials come alive -- bending, rotating and even crawling on surfaces. (2020-06-22)

Muscles support a strong immune system
In the fight against cancer or chronic infections, the immune system must be active over long periods of time. However, in the long run, the immune defence system often becomes exhausted. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now found initial evidence in mice that skeletal muscles help to keep the immune system functional in chronic diseases. (2020-06-15)

Human embryo-like model created from human stem cells
Scientists have developed a new model to study an early stage of human development, using human embryonic stem cells. (2020-06-11)

Strength training benefits patients with cirrhosis
Three hours of weekly strength training combined with protein supplements leads to both bigger and stronger muscles in patients with cirrhosis. This is shown by a new study from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital. (2020-06-11)

Scientists reveal relationship between Dek and Intron retention during muscle stem cells quiescence
Adult stem cells are essential for tissue regeneration. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of quiescent adult stem cells remain elusive. Recently, a team of HKUST scientists revealed that intron detention (IR) is a key to the mechanism; when stem cell enters quiescence exit, Dek releases conserved introns, which allow the cell to be activated. (2020-06-10)

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