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Current Muscles News and Events, Muscles News Articles.
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Link between liver and heart disease could lead to new therapeutics
A newly published study of flies found that protecting liver function also preserves heart health. The research could lead to new therapeutic approaches in human health and illuminate the role of understudied organelles known as peroxisomes. (2020-06-10)

Physical activity in all of its forms may help maintain muscle mass in midlife
Loss of estrogen has an effect on muscles and leads to a decline in muscle mass. Physical activity in all of its forms may help maintain muscle mass in midlife. (2020-06-08)

The death marker protein cleans up your muscles after exercise
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports have demonstrated that physical activity prompts a clean-up of muscles as the protein Ubiquitin tags onto worn-out proteins, causing them to be degraded. This prevents the accumulation of damaged proteins and helps keep muscles healthy. (2020-05-28)

Human growth hormone treatment after ACL injury may prevent loss of muscle strength
A new study finds the use of HGH treatment in patients that have undergone ACL reconstructive surgery may prevent the loss of muscle strength and weakness. (2020-05-27)

Gestures heard as well as seen
Gesturing with the hands while speaking is a common human behavior, but no one knows why we do it. Now, a group of UConn researchers reports in the May 11 issue of PNAS that gesturing adds emphasis to speech--but not in the way researchers had thought. (2020-05-18)

New hope for ACL injuries: Adding eccentric exercises could improve physical therapy outcomes
People with anterior cruciate ligament injuries can lose up to 40% of the muscle strength in the affected leg--with muscle atrophy remaining a big problem even after ACL reconstruction and physical therapy. (2020-05-13)

Researchers find the 'brain's steering wheel' in the brainstem of mice
In a new study in mice, neuroscientists from the University of Copenhagen have found neurons in the brain that control how the mice turn right and left. They hope that the new knowledge can be used in connection with motor disorders in humans. (2020-05-12)

How synaptic changes translate to behavior changes
Learning changes behavior by altering many connections between brain cells in a variety of ways all at the same time, according to a study of sea slugs recently published in JNeurosci. The findings offer insight into how human learning can impact widespread brain areas. (2020-05-04)

Rat spinal cords control neural function in biobots
Biological robots draw inspiration from natural systems to mimic the motions of organisms, such as swimming or jumping. Improvements to biobots to better replicate complex motor behaviors can lead to exciting biorobotic engineering applications to help solve real world challenges. However, this requires the creation of biohybrid, which is a challenge. Researchers combined an intact rat spinal cord with a tissue-engineered, 3D muscle system. They describe the novel biohybrid system in the journal APL Bioengineering. (2020-04-28)

Substituting the next-best protein
Children born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a mutation in the X-chromosome gene that would normally code for dystrophin, a protein that provides structural integrity to skeletal muscles. The loss of this protein causes severe symptoms, including deteriorating muscle strength beginning around the age of four. While there is no cure, a promising area of research has developed around the protein utrophin, which is ~ 80% identical to dystrophin and even takes its place early during muscle development. (2020-04-24)

Eye contact activates the autonomic nervous system even during video calls
A new study from Tampere University in Finland found that eye contact during video calls can elicit similar psychophysiological responses than those in genuine, in-person eye contact. (2020-04-23)

UM study finds diverse diet as effective as sports supplements for female athletes
A recently released study from the University of Montana has discovered that common 'edge,' sports nutrition products, are no more effective at promoting recovery in female athletes as regular, carbohydrate-rich, often less-expensive potato-based foods. (2020-04-17)

Rates of pulmonary complications drastically reduced with newer drug
A team of researchers at Michigan Medicine found the drug sugammadex was associated with significantly reduced rates of pulmonary complications following surgery. (2020-04-08)

Cell muscle movements visualised for first time
The movements of cell muscles in the form of tiny filaments of proteins have been visualised at unprecedented detail by University of Warwick scientists. (2020-04-06)

A 'cardiac patch with bioink' developed to repair heart
A joint research team of POSTECH, The Catholic University, and City University of Hong Kong developed an 'in vivo priming' with heart-derived bioink. Using engineered stem cells and 3D bioprinting technology, they began developing medicines for cardiovascular diseases. (2020-03-30)

For clogged and hardened hearts, a mussel is the solution
Prof. Hyung Joon Cha and his research team developed a stem cell therapy on myocardial infarction, using proteins that can be found in mussels, mussel adhesive proteins. (2020-03-25)

Keeping lower back pain at bay: Exercises designed by Lithuanians are 3 times more efficient
Lithuanian scientists have devised a spinal stabilization exercise program for managing lower back pain for people who perform a sedentary job. After testing the program with 70 volunteers, the researchers have found that the exercises are not only efficient in diminishing the non-specific lower back pain, but their effect lasts 3 times longer than that of a usual muscle strengthening exercise program. (2020-03-23)

Serum irisin: Pathogenesis and clinical research in cardiovascular diseases
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; Lutfu Askin, Kader Eliz Uzel, Okan Tanriverdi and Serdar Turkmen from the Department of Cardiology, Adiyaman Education and Research Hospital, Adiyaman, Turkey consider serum irisin pathogenesis and clinical research in cardiovascular diseases. (2020-03-19)

Newly confirmed biochemical mechanism in cells is key component of the anti-ageing program
Scientists from Russia, Germany and Switzerland now confirmed a mechanism in mouse, bat and naked mole rat cells -- a 'mild depolarization' of the inner mitochondrial membrane -- that is linked to ageing: Mild depolarization regulates the creation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) in cells and is therefore a mechanism of the anti-ageing program. (2020-03-11)

Crosstalk captured between muscles, neural networks in biohybrid machines
A platform designed for coculturing a neurosphere and muscle cells allows scientists to capture the growth of neurons toward muscles to form neuromuscular junctions. (2020-03-10)

Handheld 3D printers developed to treat musculoskeletal injuries
Biomedical engineers at the UConn School of Dental Medicine recently developed a handheld 3D bioprinter that could revolutionize the way musculoskeletal surgical procedures are performed. (2020-02-27)

Exceptional catapulting jump mechanism in a tiny beetle could be applied in robotic limbs
The fascinating and highly efficient jumping mechanism in flea beetles is described in a new research article in the open-access journal ZooKeys. Despite having been known since 1929, the explosive jump has not been fully understood. Recently, a team of Chinese and US scientists joined forces to test the existing theories, using micro-computed tomography, 3D reconstructions, high-speed filming and dissection. The team also proposed a design of a bionic limb inspired by their findings. (2020-02-25)

Stop or go: The cell maintains its fine motility balance with the help of tropomodulin
Tropomodulin maintains the fine balance between the protein machineries responsible for cell movement and morphogenesis. Disturbances in this balance are common in many diseases, for example, invasive cancers. (2020-02-17)

How kirigami can help us study the muscular activity of athletes
Scientists devise an elastic and durable skin-contact patch for measuring the electromyographic activity of the palm muscle inspired by ancient Japanese paper crafts. (2020-02-12)

Growing new blood vessels could provide new treatment for recovering movement
New research published today in The Journal of Physiology highlights the link between loss of the smallest blood vessels in muscle and difficulties moving and exercising. (2020-02-06)

Fiber crossings ahead: Key enzymes affecting nervous system pathway identified
University of Tsukuba researchers found the absence of enzymes key for corticospinal tract guidance, Sulf1 and Sulf2, results in abnormal anatomy of the corticospinal tract and impairments in fine motor function. The corticospinal tract of Sulf1/Sulf2 knockout mice showed abnormal fiber crossing at the pyramidal decussation. As a result, bilateral movement was seen when stimulating only one side of the brain, and mice had impaired fine motor control. (2020-02-05)

More than a knee injury: ACL tears cause harmful changes in our brain structure
It's known that some joint function is often permanently lost after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and re-injury is common even with intensive physical therapy, but it's unclear why. (2020-01-28)

Scientists discover link between ALS genes
Researchers at the University of Malta have discovered a link between diverse genes whose mutation causes the debilitating and fatal human disease known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Convergence in the molecular pathways underlying different ALS-causing genes points to potential new targets for drug development. (2020-01-16)

How zebra finches learn to sing
Complex learning processes like speaking or singing follow similar patterns. Using the example of zebra finches, researchers at UZH and ETH Zurich have investigated how young birds imitate the courtship songs of their fathers and practice them thousands of times. The study has revealed what aspects of the song are remembered overnight, and that sleep allows the bird to optimally build upon the progress made on the previous day. (2020-01-15)

Heart-function protein may help muscular dystrophy patients live longer
Rutgers-led discovery may help prevent muscular dystrophy-related heart disease, the leading cause of death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (2020-01-14)

Study of cardiac muscles in flies might help you keep your heart young
Iowa State University scientists restored the function of heart muscles in aging fruit flies, according to a newly published study. The genetic complex identified in the research could lead to new treatments for heart disease in humans. (2020-01-07)

Virtual reality, real injuries: OSU study shows how to reduce physical risk in VR
Carpal tunnel, stiff shoulders, eye-strain headaches -- these are all well-known side effects of prolonged computer use. But what happens when you step away from the desktop and into virtual reality? A recent study assessed how some common virtual reality movements contribute to muscle strain and discomfort. It's an effort to ensure future user safety in this fast-growing technology that's used not only for gaming, but also increasingly for education and industrial training. (2020-01-07)

Individualized physical therapy reduces incontinence, pain in men after prostate surgery
For decades, therapy to strengthen pelvic muscles has been the standard treatment for men dealing with urinary incontinence after prostate surgery. But a new study suggests that may not be the best approach. (2019-12-30)

NUS researchers uncover how fish get their shape
NUS Mechanobiology Institute researchers investigated the science behind the formation of the 'V' patterns -- also known as chevron patterns -- in the swimming muscles of fish. The study focused on the myotome (a group of muscles served by a spinal nerve root) that makes up most of the fish body. The research team found that these patterns do not simply arise from genetic instruction or biochemical pathways but actually require physical forces to correctly develop. (2019-12-22)

Strong change of course for muscle research
Scientists have discovered a new subtype of muscle stem cells. These cells have the ability to build and regenerate new muscles, making them interesting targets for the development of gene therapies. (2019-12-20)

A soft robotic insect that survives being flattened by a fly swatter
Researchers at EPFL have developed an ultra-light robotic insect that uses its soft artificial muscles to move at 3 cm per second across different types of terrain. It can be folded or crushed and yet continue to move. (2019-12-18)

Moths and perhaps other animals rely on precise timing of neural spikes
By capturing and analyzing nearly all of the brain signals sent to the wing muscles of hawk moths (Manduca sexta), researchers have shown that precise timing within rapid sequences of neural signal spikes is essential to controlling the flight muscles necessary for the moths to eat. (2019-12-17)

Suction cups that don't fall off
The aquatic larvae of the net-winged midge have the unique ability to move around at ease on rocks in torrential rivers using super-strong suction organs. Powerful modern imaging techniques have now revealed the structure of these organs in intricate detail, providing an insight into how they work so reliably. The findings, reported in the journal BMC Zoology, may inform the development of better man-made suction cups that perform well on a variety of surfaces. (2019-12-17)

Tracking titin in real time
Using new high-resolution imaging techniques, MDC researchers and colleagues have tracked titin, the body's largest protein, in real time throughout its entire lifecycle. The method and results could provide new insight into muscle development as well as treating damaged muscles and heart disease. (2019-12-13)

Elderly people should aim to keep up step count this winter
New research from the University of Liverpool, presented at The Physiological Society's early career conference Future Physiology 2019 shows that after just two weeks of reduced physical activity (around 1,500 steps per day), older adults lose significant amounts of muscle which coincides with substantial gains in body fat percentage, especially around the waist. (2019-12-11)

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