Current Muscular Dystrophy News and Events | Page 3

Current Muscular Dystrophy News and Events, Muscular Dystrophy News Articles.
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Simulating amino acid starvation may improve dengue vaccines
In a new paper in Science Signaling, researchers at the University of Hyderabad in India and the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine show that a plant-based compound called halofuginone improves the immune response to a potential vaccine against dengue virus. (2019-11-26)

Recovery from years of inactivity requires focusing on doing resistance exercises rapidly
Several years of hospitalisation, one example of muscle inactivity, causes a disproportionate decline in the muscle strength known to affect balance, increase the risk of joint injuries, and hinder movements involved in sports. That's according to research from the University of Roehampton, published today in Experimental Physiology. (2019-11-26)

Master regulator in mitochondria is critical for muscle function and repair
New study identifies how loss of mitochondrial protein MICU1 disrupts calcium balance and causes muscle atrophy and weakness. (2019-11-14)

Nusinersen improves motor function in adults with spinal muscular atrophy
A study published in the Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases presents the first evidence of mild improvement or stabilization of motor and respiratory function in adults with spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (SMA3) treated with Nusinersen, which was the case even in patients who have had the disease for 20 years or more. These findings prove the efficacy of Nusinersen beyond types and age groups, paving the way for adult treatment. (2019-11-11)

BU researchers design 'intelligent' metamaterial to make MRIs affordable and accessible
Boston University researchers have developed a new, 'intelligent' metamateria l-- which costs less than ten bucks to build -- that could revolutionize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), making the entire MRI process faster, safer, and more accessible to patients around the world. (2019-11-05)

Transforming DNA repair errors into assets
A new bioinformatics tool, MHcut reveals that a natural repair system for DNA damage, microhomology-mediated end joining, is probably far more common in humans than originally assumed. Using MHcut and commercial genome-editing technology, the researchers created mutations in iPS cells with extraordinary precision to model diseases without the need of patient samples. The tool is expected to make it easier to study diseases even when patients are rare or unavailable. (2019-10-28)

More evidence linking common bladder medication to a vision-threatening eye condition
A drug widely prescribed for a bladder condition for decades, now appears to be toxic to the retina, the light sensing tissue at the back of the eye that allows us to see. (2019-10-12)

Scientists at the MDI biological laboratory are decoding the genetic mechanisms of aging
A new paper by MDI Biological Laboratory scientists Jarod Rollins, Ph.D., and Aric Rogers, Ph.D., co-corresponding authors, describes the mechanisms by which longevity is regulated post-transcriptionally, or after a genetic blueprint has been transcribed from an organism's DNA. The identification of these mechanisms will serve as a road map for screening new, more specific drugs to prolong healthy lifespan. The laboratory, located in Bar Harbor, Maine, focuses on research on regeneration and aging. (2019-10-10)

Powerful new genomics method can be used to reveal the causes of rare genetic diseases
The technique, which appears in the latest issue of Science, makes use of the fact that people inherit two copies or ''alleles'' of virtually every gene, one from the mother and one from the father. The new method compares activity levels of maternal and paternal alleles across the genome and detects when the activity of an allele lies far enough outside the normal range to be a plausible cause of disease. (2019-10-10)

Gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy safely preserves muscle function
A gene therapy being developed at Penn Medicine to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) successfully and safely stopped the severe muscle deterioration associated with the rare, genetic disease in both small and large animal models, according to a first-of-its-kind study from Penn Medicine researchers. The findings puts the field within closer reach of a safe and effective gene therapy that uses a 'substitute' protein without triggering immune responses known to hinder other therapeutic approaches. (2019-10-07)

A protein essential for chikungunya virus replication identified
Chikungunya is an infectious disease caused by a mosquito-borne virus transmitted to humans. It is characterized by high fever and intense joint and muscle pain that can last for several months. The mechanisms of infection of human cells with the virus remain very poorly understood. Researchers have now identified a protein that is crucial in order for the virus to replicate within its target cells. This research, published in the journal Nature, opens up therapeutic avenues in the fight against chikungunya. (2019-09-25)

University of Alberta researchers developing new 'DNA stitch' to treat muscular dystrophy
A new therapeutic being tested by University of Alberta researchers is showing early promise as a more effective treatment that could help nearly half of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The treatment--a cocktail of DNA-like molecules--results in dramatic regrowth of a protein called dystrophin, which acts as a support beam to keep muscles strong. The protein is virtually absent in those with DMD. (2019-09-25)

Cheaper drug just as effective protecting heart in duchenne muscular dystrophy
A new clinical trial conducted by Ohio State University found a cost-effective generic drug works just as well as a more expensive drug in preserving heart function in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (2019-09-24)

SMART announces a revolutionary tech to study cell nanomechanics
Researchers at SMART, MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, in collaboration with MIT's Laser Biomedical Research Center (LBRC), have built a microscope that enables scientists to study the nuclear mechanics of cells while keeping their native properties intact -- something that wasn't possible with the existing invasive methods for nuclear mechanics. The breakthrough can pave the way for new cancer treatments as well as safer and more accurate cell therapies. (2019-09-19)

Gene editing enables researchers to correct mutation in muscle stem cells in DMD model
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rare but devastating genetic disorder that causes muscle loss and physical impairments. Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have shown in a mouse study that the powerful gene editing technique known as CRISPR may provide the means for lifelong correction of the genetic mutation responsible for the disorder. (2019-09-17)

Knotty problem of cell reprogramming solved, USC scientists report
USC scientists surmount roadblock in regenerative medicine that has constrained the ability to use repurposed cells to treat diseases. (2019-09-12)

A smart artificial hand for amputees merges user and robotic control
EPFL scientists have successfully tested new neuroprosthetic technology that combines robotic control with users' voluntary control, opening avenues in the new interdisciplinary field of shared control for neuroprosthetic technologies. (2019-09-11)

Biology of bat wings may hold lessons for cold-weather work, exercise
The muscles in bats' wings are much cooler than the muscles in their core, a new study finds -- and this research could one day enhance our understanding of human muscle. (2019-09-11)

University of Minnesota research discovers inhibitor to reverse toxic DUX4 effects
New University of Minnesota Medical School research identifies an inhibitor that protects cells from toxic effects associated with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy in cells and mice. (2019-09-11)

Mutation that causes rare muscle disease protects against HIV-1 infection
A mutation that causes a type of muscular dystrophy that affects the limbs protects against HIV-1 infection, according to a study published Aug. 29, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Sara Rodríguez-Mora, Mayte Coiras and José Alcamí of the Instituto de Salud Carlos III in Madrid, Spain, and colleagues. (2019-08-29)

A genetic chaperone for healthy aging?
Researchers at the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) have identified an epigenetic mechanism that appears to strongly influence healthy aging. It's a protein that controls muscle integrity, lifespan and levels of an essential sugar. How does one protein have that much power? (2019-08-09)

The mind-muscle connection: For aesthetes, not athletes?
The 'mind-muscle connection.' Ancient lore for bodybuilders, latest buzz for Instragram fitness followers. But when the goal is muscle performance rather than growth alone, does the idea still carry any weight? Published in Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, new analysis suggests that to lift heavier, or longer, it is better to focus on moving the weight itself -- not your muscles. (2019-08-09)

New research identifies gene that hides cancer cells from immunotherapy
A team at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has identified a gene that could make immunotherapy treatments, specifically checkpoint inhibitors, work for a wider variety of cancer patients. The study, published today in Developmental Cell, found that when the DUX4 gene is expressed in cancer cells, it can prevent the cancer from being recognized and destroyed by the immune system. (2019-07-18)

Early mammal fossil reveals the evolutionary origins of having a loose tongue
Our highly mobile mammalian tongues, which allow us to swallow chewed food and suckle milk as babies, may have evolutionary origins in some of our most early mammalioform ancestors, according to a new study, which finds remarkably complex and modern mammal-like hyoid bones in a newly discovered 165-million-year-old mammaliaform species. (2019-07-18)

Novel nanoparticles deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cell with much higher efficiency
Researchers have developed a significantly improved delivery mechanism for the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing method in the liver. The delivery uses biodegradable synthetic lipid nanoparticles that carry the molecular editing tools into the cell to precisely alter the cells' genetic code with as much as 90 percent efficiency. The nanoparticles could help overcome technical hurdles to enable gene editing in a broad range of clinical therapeutic applications. (2019-07-12)

New analysis shows drug slows down respiratory decline
Duchenne muscular dystrophy occurs in boys and is characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness leading to a decline in respiratory function. Strategies to arrest this severe progressive deterioration are needed to extend lives and improve quality of life. Results of three clinical trials using eteplirsen, an exon-skipping antisense oligonucleotide, show promising results, according to a study published in the Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases. (2019-07-09)

First in vivo proof-of-concept in Steinert's myotonic dystrophy
Ana Buj Bello's team, a researcher in an Inserm unit at Genethon, the AFM-Telethon laboratory, has made the proof-of-concept of a CRISPR-Cas9 approach in a mouse model of Steinert's myotonic dystrophy, the most common neuromuscular disease in adults. (2019-06-25)

Researchers identify potential modifier genes in patients with charcot-marie-tooth disease
Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited neurological disorder affecting peripheral motor and/or sensory nerves in humans. Monogenic disorders like CMT1A, CMT's most prevalent subtype, are caused by a single gene defect. However, its clinical presentation and severity can vary widely, leading doctors to wonder what factors might be responsible for these differences. (2019-06-18)

The evolution of puppy dog eyes
Dogs have evolved new muscles around the eyes to better communicate with humans. New research comparing the anatomy and behavior of dogs and wolves suggests dogs' facial anatomy has changed over thousands of years specifically to allow them to better communicate with humans. (2019-06-17)

Researchers' discovery could lead to improved therapies for duchenne muscular dystrophy
Researchers found that the protein sarcospan can play a major role in combating heart failure in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. (2019-06-14)

Scholars investigate how mirror activity works
A team of researchers from Germany and Russia, including Vadim Nikulin from the Higher School of Economics, have demonstrated that long contraction of muscles in one hand increases involuntary reaction of the other one. Meanwhile, the time between muscle contractions in both hands decreases. The results of the study have been published in Neuroscience. (2019-06-07)

Worm study sparks hope for slowing muscle decline
Muscle decline caused by ageing and certain diseases could be dramatically slowed by stopping a chain reaction that damages cells, new research shows. (2019-06-07)

Association for Molecular Pathology expresses serious concerns with Congress' attempt to resurrect human gene patenting debate and reverse settled Supreme Court ruling
AMP has expressed serious concerns with Congress' recent proposal to amend Section 101 of the Patent Act. If enacted, the draft legislation would overturn 150 years of patent case law and permit patenting of human genes and naturally occurring associations between genes and diseases. (2019-06-04)

Losing muscle to fat: misdirected fate of a multipotent stem cell drives LGMD2B
The sudden appearance of clinical symptoms in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B is due to a unique extracellular environment in which a specific membrane repair protein coaxes fibro/adipogenic precursors to first proliferate and then differentiate into fatty tissue, rather than play their normal role of helping the muscle fibers repair. (2019-06-03)

Lithium boosts muscle strength in mice with rare muscular dystrophy
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that lithium improves muscle size and strength in mice with a rare form of muscular dystrophy that causes weakness in the shoulders and hips. The findings, published April 18 in Neurology Genetics, could lead to a drug for the disabling condition. (2019-06-03)

Researchers discover how three-dimensional organization of the genome regulates cell differentiation
A new study from the University of Minnesota Medical School clarifies how the three-dimensional organization of the genome is regulated at the onset of skeletal muscle formation. (2019-05-24)

How does the nervous system create behavior? Muscle activity map in Hydra gives insight
Accomplishing perhaps a world first, researchers at Columbia University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have mapped the full-body muscular activity of an animal while it was moving and behaving. Their study adds to mounting evidence that the coordinated activity of many cells working together -- in this case, across an entire organism -- generates new functional and behavioral properties that are not present in single cells. (2019-05-23)

Duchenne muscular dystrophy prevalence increases, while incidence remains steady
In the first study of its kind involving Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in the US, researchers from the Deerfield Institute found that while the number of new cases has remained stable, there has been an uptick in prevalence -- largely attributed to enhanced treatments and longevity. (2019-05-20)

Embryogenesis reveals the role of the 'second brain' in digestion
Two muscles in the gut move along and mix together ingested food, and in between them is an autonomous network of neurons. Researchers have discovered how neurons control the muscular contractions involved in digestion. The first movements in an intestine are purely muscular, but researchers discovered that once activated, the intestinal nervous system coordinates the two muscles. Studying these reflexes provides further insight into how these organs function and can be affected by illness. (2019-05-15)

Pelvic exercises may beat bedroom blues
Physiotherapists from James Cook University in Australia say simple pelvic floor exercises may be a cure for some common problems men experience in the bedroom. (2019-05-14)

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