Current Musicians News and Events

Current Musicians News and Events, Musicians News Articles.
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Notes of discomfort: Study keys in on trends in marching band members' pain
Marching band members in leadership roles are more likely to feel discomfort in the neck and upper back than their less experienced bandmates, who in turn are more susceptible to left-hand pain and cognitive strain, a new study suggests. (2021-02-09)

The benefits of reading outdoors
Investigators demonstrate that image luminance has opposite effects on the contrast sensitivity of cortical pathways signaling lights than darks. It impairs luminance discrimination for the brightest stimuli of the scene while improving it for the darkest stimuli, a mechanism that is needed to efficiently sample natural scenes. (2021-02-02)

Musicians have more connected brains than non-musicians
The brains of musicians have stronger structural and functional connections compared to those of non-musicians, regardless of innate pitch ability, according to new research from JNeurosci. (2021-01-25)

Why an early start is key to developing musical skill later in life
Is there, as some have suggested, a developmental period early in life when the brain is especially receptive to musical training? The answer, according to new research published in the journal Psychological Science, is probably not. (2020-12-22)

New method for imaging exhaled breath could provide insights into COVID-19 transmission
A new method for visualizing breath that is exhaled while someone is speaking or singing could provide important new insights into how diseases such as COVID-19 spread and the effectiveness of face masks. (2020-12-21)

Big data will analyze the mystery of Beethoven's metronome
Data science and physics research at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and UNED has analysed a centuries-old controversy over Beethoven's annotations about the tempo (the playing speed) of his works, which is considered to be too fast based on these marks. In this study, published in the PLOS ONE journal, it is noted that this deviation could be explained by the composer reading the metronome incorrectly when using it to measure the beat of his symphonies. (2020-12-17)

Keeping the beat - it's all in your brain
How do people coordinate their actions with the sounds they hear? This basic ability, which allows people to cross the street safely while hearing oncoming traffic, dance to new music or perform team events such as rowing, has puzzled cognitive neuroscientists for years. A new study led by researchers at McGill University is shining a light on how auditory perception and motor processes work together. (2020-09-01)

Network of sounds: New research reveals the magic secret of human networks
A group of Israeli researchers recruited 16 violinists to study the behavior of a human network and find out what sets it apart from other networks, such as animals, computers and other objects. The results combine science and aesthetics and also evoke thoughts about the spread of the coronavirus. (2020-08-11)

Music on the brain
A new study looks at differences between the brains of Japanese classical musicians, Western classical musicians and nonmusicians. Researchers investigated specific kinds of neural behavior in participants as they were exposed to unfamiliar rhythms and nonrhythmic patterns. Trained musicians showed greater powers of rhythmic prediction compared to nonmusicians, with more subtle differences between those trained in Japanese or Western classical music. This research has implications for studies of cultural impact on learning and brain development. (2020-07-20)

Fans love musicians' personalities as much as their music
Why do you like the music you do? You would think that it is because of the music itself. But that's only half the story. Surprisingly, the other half of the story doesn't have much to do with music at all. A new Big Data study from Bar-Ilan University and Columbia Business School found that the musician's personality plays a large role, as well, in listener preferences. (2020-07-02)

The human brain tracks speech more closely in time than other sounds
The way that speech processing differs from the processing of other sounds has long been a major open question in human neuroscience. Researchers at Aalto University have endeavored to answer this by investigating brain representations for natural spoken words using machine learning models and comparing them with representations of environmental sounds that refer to the same concepts - such as the word cat and a cat meowing. (2020-06-22)

Do you want a cheerleader or a critic? The Voice shows how we really choose our mentors.
We think that we will choose our personal and professional advisors based on reasoned criteria about their expertise, competence and experience. In practice, we go more with our gut than our head, choosing the person who shows enthusiasm for us and our goals. A team of researchers has used the popular singing competition show The Voice to prove it. (2020-06-11)

Unwinding the mystery of degraded reel-to-reel tapes
As reel-to-reel tapes make a comeback among audio buffs, scientists are unraveling the secret of why some decades-old tapes are unplayable, while others retain their original superb audio fidelity. The researchers are presenting their results through the American Chemical Society SciMeetings online platform. (2020-04-08)

Where in the brain does creativity come from? Evidence from jazz musicians
A new brain-imaging study out of Drexel University's Creativity Research Lab studied the brain activity of jazz guitarists during improvisation to show that creativity is, in fact, driven primarily by the right hemisphere in musicians who are comparatively inexperienced at improvisation. However, musicians who are highly experienced at improvisation rely primarily on their left hemisphere. (2020-03-31)

Swing feel in the lab
The role of temporal fluctuations for the swing feel in jazz music. (2020-01-29)

Play sports for a healthier brain
There have been many headlines in recent years about the potentially negative impacts contact sports can have on athletes' brains. But a new Northwestern University study shows that, in the absence of injury, athletes across a variety of sports -- including football, soccer and hockey -- have healthier brains than non-athletes. (2019-12-09)

How playing the drums changes the brain
People who play drums regularly for years differ from unmusical people in their brain structure and function. The results of a study by researchers from Bochum suggest that they have fewer, but thicker fibres in the main connecting tract between the two halves of the brain. In addition, their motor brain areas are organised more efficiently. (2019-12-09)

The human brain is prepared to follow the rhythm of a song or of a dance
So reveals a study that explores the relationship between the rhythmic structure of music and the spatial dimension of sound, published in Brain and Cognition by Alexandre Celma-Miralles and Juan Manuel Toro (ICREA), researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition. (2019-11-26)

Musicians at serious risk of tinnitus, researchers show
People working in the music industry are nearly twice as likely to develop tinnitus as people working in quieter occupations, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Manchester. (2019-11-20)

Smart people may learn music faster
Why do some people learn music more quickly than others? Intelligence could play a role, according to a Michigan State University study that investigated the early stages of learning to play piano. (2019-11-14)

Delayed neural communication may underlie anticipatory behaviors
Computational modeling suggests that delayed communication between neurons may be an essential factor underlying anticipatory behaviors in people. Irán Román of Stanford University in Stanford, Calif., and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-10-31)

Musical perception: nature or nurture?
This is the subject of the research by Juan Manuel Toro (ICREA) and Carlota Pagès Portabella, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition, published in the journal Psychophysiology as part of a H2020 project being carried out with Fundació Bial to understand the neuronal bases of musical cognition. (2019-10-10)

A metronome for quantum particles
Physicists in Vienna have found a way to measure the elusive quantum phase of electrons. This enables a new, better view of important phenomena used in photosensors or photovoltaics. (2019-10-01)

Brain stimulation prevents anxiety-induced decrease in motor performances
Researchers in the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology and the Centre national de la recherché scientifique used fMRI to discover a new neural mechanism involving the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex to explain how anxiety deteriorates physical performance. Moreover, the performance deterioration was rescued by suppressing brain activity with transcranial magnetic stimulation to the dACC. The findings would provide a new therapeutic strategy for athletes, musicians and other performers susceptible to anxiety during performance. (2019-09-24)

Decoding Beethoven's music style using data science
What makes Beethoven sound like Beethoven? EPFL researchers have completed a first analysis of Beethoven's writing style, applying statistical techniques to unlock recurring patterns. (2019-06-06)

Artificial intelligence enables recognizing and assessing a violinist's bow movements
In playing music, gestures are extremely important, in part because they are directly related to the sound and the expressiveness of the musicians. Today, technology exists that captures movement and is capable of detecting gestural details very precisely. (2019-04-02)

Dopamine conducts prefrontal cortex ensembles
New research in rodents reveals for the first time how dopamine changes the function of the brain's prefrontal cortex. In a study published today in the journal Cell Reports, researchers found that dopamine has little effect on individual cells. Instead, it generates sustained activity in the ensemble of cells in the prefrontal cortex that lasts for up to 20 minutes. (2019-04-02)

People 'hear' flashes due to disinhibited flow of signals around the brain, suggests study
A synaesthesia-like effect in which people 'hear' silent flashes or movement, such as in popular 'noisy GIFs' and memes, could be due to a reduction of inhibition of signals that travel between visual and auditory areas of the brain, according to a new study led by researchers at City, University of London. It was also found that musicians taking part in the study were significantly more likely to report experiencing visual ear than non-musician participants. (2019-03-27)

Trained musicians perform better -- at paying attention
Musical training produces lasting improvements to a cognitive mechanism that helps individuals be more attentive and less likely to be distracted by irrelevant stimuli while performing demanding tasks. (2019-03-26)

The medium shapes the message: New communication technologies may bias historical record
The introduction of communication technologies appears to bias historical records in the direction of the content best suited for each technology, according to a study published Feb. 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by C. Jara-Figueroa and colleagues from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA. (2019-02-20)

Smoking may limit body's ability to fight dangerous form of skin cancer
Melanoma patients with a history of smoking cigarettes are 40 percent less likely to survive their skin cancer than people who have never smoked, according to a new report funded by Cancer Research UK. (2019-02-17)

Pitch perfect: Brain differences behind a rare musical ability
New research published in JNeurosci reports features of the brain in musicians with absolute, or perfect, pitch (AP) that likely enable individuals with this rare ability -- shared by Mozart, Bach, and Beethoven -- to precisely identify musical notes. (2019-02-11)

New music styles: How the challenger calls the tune
A research team including two members of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna found that fashion cycles in music are driven by outsider groups. These outsiders challenge the dominant music style by strongly contrasting the preferences of the current elite: 'they use counter-signaling.' (2019-02-06)

A solid scaffolding for our cells
To perform properly the task for which they have been synthesized, proteins must first assemble to form effective cellular 'machines'. But how do they recognize their partners at the right time? Researchers at UNIGE have deciphered the fundamental role of the Not1 protein, conserved in all eukaryotic organisms: by regulating the activity of ribosomes, Not1 allows proteins that must work together to be synthesized in the same place and at the same time. (2019-01-28)

Computer analysis shows that popular music lyrics become angrier and sadder over time
A scientific analysis of the sentiment of popular music lyrics from the 1950s to 2016 showed that the expression of anger and sadness in popular music has increased gradually over time, while the expression of joy has declined. (2019-01-24)

Researchers examine how musicians communicate non-verbally during performance
A team of researchers from McMaster University has discovered a new technique to examine how musicians intuitively coordinate with one another during a performance, silently predicting how each will express the music. (2019-01-18)

Is there a universal hierarchy of human senses?
Research at the University of York has shown that the accepted hierarchy of human senses -- sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell -- is not universally true across all cultures. (2018-11-05)

Sensors that are literally 'music to one's ears' (video)
Researchers have found a new use for a 3,000-year-old African musical instrument: detecting toxic substances and counterfeit medications. The sensor, based on the mbira (pronounced 'em-bir'-uh') is inexpensive and easy to operate, allowing its use in developing regions, the researchers say. They report their results in ACS Omega. (2018-09-12)

Beatboxers' and guitarists' brains react differently to hearing music
The brains of professional beatboxers and guitarists respond to music differently when compared to each other and non-musicians, finds a new UCL-led study published in Cerebral Cortex. (2018-09-05)

Math + good posture = better scores
A San Francisco State University study finding that students perform better at math while sitting with good posture could have implications for other kinds of performance under pressure. (2018-08-03)

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