Current Mussels News and Events

Current Mussels News and Events, Mussels News Articles.
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Controls needed to stop zebra mussels invading Great Britain
Research team call for more controls and monitoring around boat ramps to reduce the damage caused by zebra mussels. (2021-02-01)

Invasive mussels now control a key nutrient in the American Great Lakes
The spread of quagga mussels across the American Great Lakes has transformed the supply of phosphorus - a key biological nutrient - to the ecosystem, according to research published this week in PNAS. (2021-01-26)

Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria
Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then ''wake up''. (2021-01-20)

Study identifies immune response biomarkers, novel pathways in four marine mollusc species
A new study involving the University of Maine assessed immune responses in four economically important marine mollusc species -- the blue mussel, soft-shell clam, Eastern oyster, and Atlantic jackknife clam -- and identified new biomarkers relating to changes in protein function involved in novel regulatory mechanisms of important metabolic and immunological pathways. (2021-01-12)

Native biodiversity collapse in the Eastern Mediterranean
An international team led by Paolo G. Albano from the Department of Palaeontology at the University of Vienna quantified a dramatic biodiversity collapse of up to 95 per cent of native species in the Eastern Mediterranean. The study is published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. (2021-01-07)

Risk of extinction cascades from freshwater mussels to a bitterling fish
Reproduction of native and invasive bitterling fishes and their hybridisation was studied in Japan. We collected mussels in which these bitterlings lay their eggs, kept them in aquaria, collected eggs/larvae ejected from mussels, and genotyped them. We found that hybrids occurred when local mussel density was low. The rapid decline of the host mussels and artificial introduction of an invasive congener interacted to cause the rapid decline of a native fish. (2021-01-04)

Highest levels of microplastics found in molluscs, new study says
Mussels, oysters and scallops have the highest levels of microplastic contamination among seafood, a new study reveals. (2020-12-23)

The most consumed species of mussels contain microplastics all around the world
''If you eat mussels, you eat microplastics.'' This was already known to a limited extent about mussels from individual ocean regions. A new study by the University of Bayreuth reveals that this claim holds true globally. (2020-12-17)

More frequent and extreme marine heatwaves likely to threaten starfish
Common starfish cannot survive amplified marine heatwaves projected at the end of the century and experience lasting negative effects from current heatwaves, according to new research being presented on at the British Ecological Society's Festival of Ecology. (2020-12-14)

Metal pollution in British waters may be threatening scallops, study reveals
Research, led by an interdisciplinary team at the University of York, suggests that the contamination of Isle of Man seabed sediments with zinc, lead and copper from the mining of these metals, which peaked on the island in the late 19th century, is causing the shells of king scallops to become significantly more brittle (2020-11-05)

From hard to soft: making sponges from mussel shells
Scientists have discovered a spongy form of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), a material found in limestone, chalk, marble, and the shells of mussels and other shellfish. While most forms of calcium carbonate are hard minerals, this new form is soft and absorbent. The researchers, reporting November 5 in the journal Matter, made the discovery while exploring new uses for leftover mussel shells. (2020-11-05)

Small mussels in the Baltic are getting even smaller
Blue mussels in the Baltic Sea are getting smaller with time but bigger in numbers, according to a new study from Stockholm University. Analyzing data from the last 24 years, the main reason for this appears to be changes in food quality. The type of phytoplankton that is available for blue mussels to eat can in turn be linked to our changing climate. (2020-10-27)

Declines in shellfish species on rocky seashores match climate-driven changes
Mussels, barnacles, and snails are declining in the Gulf of Maine, according to a new paper by biologists Peter Petraitis of the University of Pennsylvania and Steve Dudgeon of California State University, Northridge. Their 20-year dataset reveals that the populations' steady dwindling matches up with the effects of climate change on the region. (2020-10-20)

Future ocean conditions could cause significant physical changes in marine mussels
Scientists from the University of Plymouth showed increased temperature and acidification of our oceans over the next century could have a range of effects on an economically important marine species (2020-10-09)

Laundry lint can cause significant tissue damage within marine mussels
Research by the University of Plymouth showed that ingesting lint caused significant abnormality within the mussels' gills, as well as atrophy or deformities leading to loss of definition in digestive tubules (2020-10-02)

Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Feeding rates of blue mussels slow down under ocean acidification conditions, and the cause may be the slowing beat of gill cilia, similar to a known response in human lung cells. (2020-09-29)

'Wrong-way' migrations stop shellfish from escaping ocean warming
Ocean warming is paradoxically driving bottom-dwelling invertebrates -- including sea scallops, blue mussels, surfclams and quahogs that are valuable to the shellfish industry -- into warmer waters and threatening their survival, a Rutgers-led study shows. (2020-09-07)

Decreased iron levels in seawater make mussels loosen their grip
Mussels secrete sticky plaques that help them attach to wet surfaces, such as rocks on the beach. These adhesive structures are rich in iron, which is thought to help make the attachments strong yet flexible. Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology have shown that mussels form weaker attachments in iron-deficient seawater, revealing a possible consequence of altered iron bioavailability in oceans. (2020-07-29)

Burrowing crabs reshaping salt marshes, with climate change to blame
Given higher sea levels and softer soil in the wake of a shifting climate, Sesarma crabs, which have already decimated salt marshes in the Northeast, are now rising to prominence in southeastern marshes, a new study finds. (2020-07-13)

Novel bioaccumulative compounds found in marine bivalves
The present study screened known and unknown organohalogen compounds present in mussel and sediment samples from Hiroshima Bay. The results provided scientific evidence that unknown mixed halogenated compounds are ubiquitous in the coastal environment and possess bioaccumulative potential as high as persistent organic pollutants. (2020-06-02)

Can e-learning help stem the threat of invasive alien species such as Japanese Knotweed?
E-learning could be a crucial tool in the biosecurity fight against invasive alien species such as Japanese Knotweed, Zebra Mussels and Signal Crayfish according to a new study published in the academic journal 'Biological Invasions'. (2020-05-26)

Mussel reefs heighten risk of microplastic exposure and consumption
In the first study of its kind, scientists found that when mussels were clumped together forming reefs -- as they do in nature -- the reef structure resulted in a three-fold rise in the amount of ingested plastic. (2020-05-18)

Otters juggle stones when hungry, research shows
Hunger is likely to be the main driver of stone juggling in otters, new research has shown. (2020-05-05)

Neanderthals ate mussels, fish, and seals too
Over 80,000 years ago, Neanderthals fed themselves on mussels, fish and other marine life. The first evidence has been found by an international team including Göttingen University in the cave of Figueira Brava in Portugal. The excavated layers date from 86,000 to 106,000 years ago, the period when Neanderthals settled in Europe. Sourcing food from the sea at that time had only been attributed to anatomically modern humans in Africa. Results were published in Science. (2020-03-26)

How do you make adhesives for electronics, vehicles, and construction tougher?
A Purdue University team, looking to make adhesives tougher, added bonds that are broken easily throughout the material. When pressure or stress is applied to the glue, these sacrificial bonds are designed to absorb energy and break apart. Meanwhile, the rest of the larger adhesive system remains intact. (2020-03-03)

MTU engineers zap and unstick underwater smart glue
Turning adhesion on and off is what makes a glue smart. Inspired by nature, catechols are synthetic compounds that mimic the wet-but-still-sticky proteins found in mussel feet and offer promise for underwater glue, wound dressings, prosthetic attachments or even making car parts and in other manufacturing. A Michigan Tech team has used electricity for the first time to deactivate a catechol-containing adhesive in salt water. (2020-03-02)

Invasive species that threaten biodiversity on the Antarctic Peninsula are identified
Mediterranean mussels, seaweed and some species of land plants and invertebrates are among the 13 species that are most likely to damage the ecosystems on the Antarctic Peninsula. (2020-02-12)

The secret life of microbes -- a snapshot of molecules in a deep-sea symbiosis
Mussels in the deep sea can only survive there thanks to symbiotic bacteria living inside of them. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have now succeeded for the first time in simultaneously identifying individual bacteria in the symbiosis and measuring which metabolites they convert. This enables a new understanding of many biological processes. The researchers now present their results in Nature Microbiology. (2020-02-03)

The secret of strong underwater mussel adhesion revealed
Hyung Joon Cha and his research team identified a mechanism of adhesive proteins in a mussel that controls the surface adhesion and cohesion. They substantiated the synergy of molecules in adhesive proteins. Their new discovery is expected to be applied in making stronger underwater bioadhesive than the conventional ones. (2020-01-22)

Genetic variation gives mussels a chance to adapt to climate change
Existing genetic variation in natural populations of Mediterranean mussels allows them to adapt to declining pH levels in seawater caused by carbon emissions. A new study by biologists from the University of Chicago shows that mussels raised in a low pH experimental environment grew smaller shells than those grown at normal pH levels, but the overall survival rate of mussels grown under both conditions was the same. (2019-12-20)

Your food may help make stickier, safer glues for laptops, packaging, furniture
A group of scientists at Purdue University has taken inspiration from the field, kitchen and the ocean to create strong glues. (2019-12-05)

Contamination by metals can increase metabolic stress in mussels
The researchers propose that this evidence should be used as input to public policy with the aim of mitigating the impacts of human activities on coastal and marine ecosystems. (2019-12-04)

Smarter strategies
Though small and somewhat nondescript, quagga and zebra mussels pose a huge threat to local rivers, lakes and estuaries. Thanks to aggressive measures to prevent contamination, Santa Barbara County's waters have so far been clear of the invasive mollusks, but stewards of local waterways, reservoirs and water recreation areas remain vigilant to the possibility of infestation by these and other non-native organisms. (2019-12-02)

Australia's got mussels (but it could be a problem)
One of the world's most notorious invasive species has established itself on Australia's coastlines, according to research from The University of Queensland. UQ School of Biological Sciences researcher Dr Iva Popovic said the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis - identified as one of the '100 World's Worst Invasive Species' by the IUCN Global Invasive Species Database - had steadily taken over the country's coastlines. (2019-11-28)

Contagious cancer in shellfish is spreading across the Atlantic Ocean
By learning how contagious cancer spread among shellfish, scientists hope to better understand how cancer metastasizes in people. (2019-11-27)

New electrodes could increase efficiency of electric vehicles and aircraft
The rise in popularity of electric vehicles and aircraft presents the possibility of moving away from fossil fuels toward a more sustainable future. While significant technological advancements have dramatically increased the efficiency of these vehicles, there are still several issues standing in the way of widespread adoption. (2019-11-22)

Deep-sea bacteria copy their neighbors' diet
A new group of symbiotic bacteria in deep-sea mussels surprises with the way they fix carbon: They use the Calvin cycle to turn carbon into tasty food. The bacteria acquired the genes for this process from neighboring symbiotic bacteria in the mussel. These results from a recent study by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, now published in ISME Journal, call into question our current understanding of carbon fixation pathways in the deep sea. (2019-11-19)

Getting glued in the sea
New bio-inspired hydrogels can act like superglue in highly ionic environments such as seawater, overcoming issues in currently available marine adhesives. (2019-11-12)

Gimme shelter: Seven new leech species call freshwater mussels home
The frequent presence of leeches with a hidden lifestyle in the mantle cavity of freshwater mussels has been recorded since the second half of the 19th century. Yet this was, until now, regarded as an accidental phenomenon. Recent research not only reveals seven mussel-associated leech species new to science, but also shows that their association evolved over millions of years. (2019-11-11)

Infectious cancer in mussels spread across the Atlantic
An infectious cancer that originated in 1 species of mussel growing in the Northern Hemisphere has spread to related mussels in South America and Europe, says a new study published today in eLife. (2019-11-05)

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