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Invasive species short-circuiting benefits from mercury reduction in the Great Lakes
According to a new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 40 years of reduced mercury use, emissions, and loading in the Great Lakes region have largely not produced equivalent declines in the amount of mercury accumulating in large game fish. (2019-11-04)

Deep water sites off the US northeast coast are suitable for offshore blue mussel farms
Offshore mussel farm sites need to have the right temperature, food availability, and the right currents. According to a study by researchers at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, several suitable locations can be found off the Northeastern US. (2019-10-16)

Many cooks don't spoil the broth: Manifold symbionts prepare the host for any eventuality
Deep-sea mussels, which rely on symbiotic bacteria for food, harbor a surprisingly high diversity of these bacterial 'cooks': Up to 16 different bacterial strains live in the mussel's gills, each with its own abilities and strengths. Thanks to this diversity, the mussel is prepared for all eventualities, researchers around Rebecca Ansorge and Nicole Dubilier from the Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and Jillian Petersen from the University of Vienna now report in Nature Microbiology. (2019-10-15)

The makeup of mariculture: FSU researchers examine global trends in seafood farming
The process of farming seafood in the ocean, known as mariculture, is a growing trend yet little is known about the trajectories of its development. That's why a team of Florida State University researchers set out to shed some light on the industry. (2019-10-14)

Asian carp capable of surviving in much larger areas of Lake Michigan than previously thought
Asian carp are capable of surviving and growing in much larger portions of Lake Michigan than scientists previously believed and present a high risk of becoming established, according to a new modeling study from University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues. (2019-08-12)

Calcium levels in freshwater lakes declining in Europe and North America
A new global study of how calcium concentrations are changing in freshwater lakes around the world has revealed that in widespread areas in Europe and eastern North America, calcium levels are declining towards levels that can be critically low for the reproduction and survival of many aquatic organisms. (2019-08-06)

Mussels are inspiring new technology that could help purify water and clean up oil spills
Mussels are notorious maritime stowaways known for damaging the hulls of boats, but these same adhesive properties have widespread engineering applications, scientists in China and the United states write in review published July 10 in the journal Matter. They suggest that the chemistry of mussel threads is inspiring engineering innovations that address a wide range of problems, from cleaning up oil spills to treating contaminated water. (2019-07-10)

FEFU scientist reported on concentration of pesticides in marine organisms
According to ecotoxicologist from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), from the 90s and during 2000s in the tissues of Russian Far Eastern mussels the concentration of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) that had been globally used in agriculture in the mid-twentieth century has increased about ten times. OCPs pollute and affect badly the ecosystems of the Sea of Japan, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Bering Sea. A related review was published in Water Research. (2019-06-19)

Freshwater mussel shells were material of choice for prehistoric craftsmen
An international team of researchers, including academics from the University of York, have discovered that 6000-years-ago people across Europe shared a cultural tradition of using freshwater mussel shells to craft ornaments. (2019-05-07)

Antarctica: the final frontier for marine biological invasions?
A new study looking at the implications of increased shipping activity and the impact on Antarctic marine biodiversity is published this week in the journal Global Change Biology. The research is an important step in the quest to understand whether invasive species, introduced by shipping, will find the Antarctic marine environment more hospitable as Antarctica's climate changes. (2019-04-24)

Researchers remove harmful hormones from Las Vegas wastewater using green algae
A common species of freshwater green algae is capable of removing certain endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) from wastewater, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Las Vegas. In a new study published in the journal Environmental Pollution, DRI researchers Xuelian Bai, Ph.D., and Kumud Acharya, Ph.D., explore the potential for use of a species of freshwater green algae called Nannochloris to remove EDCs from treated wastewater. (2019-04-08)

Invasive round gobies may be poised to decimate endangered French Creek mussels
The round goby -- a small, extremely prolific, invasive fish from Europe -- poses a threat to endangered freshwater mussels in northwestern Pennsylvania's French Creek, one of the last strongholds for two species of mussels, according to researchers. (2019-04-01)

New technique could help regrow tissue lost to periodontal disease
According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about half of all Americans will have periodontal disease at some point in their lives. Characterized by inflamed gums and bone loss around teeth, the condition can cause bad breath, toothache, tender gums and, in severe cases, tooth loss. Now, in ACS Nano, researchers report development of a membrane that helps periodontal tissue regenerate when implanted into the gums of rats. (2019-03-21)

Sea otters' tool use leaves behind distinctive archaeological evidence
An international team of researchers has analyzed the use by sea otters of large, shoreline rocks as 'anvils' to break open shells, as well as the resulting shell middens. The researchers used ecological and archaeological approaches to identify patterns that are characteristic of sea otter use of such locations. By looking at evidence of past anvil stone use, scientists could better understand sea otter habitat use. (2019-03-14)

Munitions at the bottom of the Baltic Sea
The bottom of the Baltic Sea is home to large quantities of sunken munitions, a legacy of the Second World War -- and often very close to shore. Should we simply leave them where they are and accept the risk of their slowly releasing toxic substances, or should we instead remove them, and run the risk of their falling apart -- or even exploding? (2019-02-08)

Cooking chemistry minus heat equals new non-toxic adhesive
A new soy-based, non-toxic adhesive could be used in organic food packaging and some speciality food items. (2019-01-31)

Plastic pollution causes mussels to lose grip
A new study shows that microplastics are affecting the ability of mussels to attach themselves to their surroundings -- potentially having a devastating impact on ocean ecosystems as well as a worldwide industry worth between 3-4 billion US dollars per year. (2019-01-29)

Study identifies biomedical potential of bivalves
Shellfish like oysters and mussels have the potential to revolutionize human health research, according to a new paper in Developmental and Comparative Immunology. The study reveals how using bivalves as model organisms offers numerous promising avenues for medical research -- from pharmaceutical development to bone regeneration. (2019-01-29)

Newcomers play cryptic
Invasive species can put native animal and plant species on the brink of extinction. They often go undetected for a long time, or their damaging impacts are not immediately clear. This phenomenon - referred to as crypticity - represents a huge challenge for the management of species communities and the conservation of biodiversity. This is the conclusion of an international team of researchers. (2019-01-24)

Custom-made artificial mother-of-pearl
ETH researchers developed an imitation comparable to mother-of-pearl, the physical properties of which can be specifically adjusted. (2018-12-11)

Study shows how mussels handle microplastic fiber pollution
New research shows that mussels readily take in microplastic pollution fibers from the ocean but quickly flush most of them out again, according to a study by researchers from Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. (2018-12-04)

How ancient Mayan shell decor led to a new look at freshwater mussels south of the border
An unlikely collaboration between archaeologists desperate to put names to shells at Mayan dig sites and an ichthyologist led to the first molecular study of Mexican and Central American freshwater mussels. (2018-11-26)

White line of algae deaths marks uplift in 2016 Chilean earthquake
A bleached fringe of dead marine algae, strung along the coastlines of two islands off the coast of Chile, offers a unique glimpse at how the land rose during the 2016 magnitude 7.6 ChiloƩ earthquake, according to a new study in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. (2018-11-06)

New research recovers nutrients from seafood process water
Process waters from the seafood industry contain valuable nutrients, that could be used in food or aquaculture feed. But currently, these process waters are treated as waste. Now, a research project from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows the potential of recycling these nutrients back into the food chain. (2018-10-31)

Is there a risk to human health from microplastics?
The Austrian Federal Environment Agency and the Medical University of Vienna have presented the first preliminary results of a pilot study on microplastics (microplastic particles) in humans. They have detected microplastic particles in stool of eight volunteers. The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) summarizes its findings on possible health risks of microplastic particles for humans. (2018-10-31)

Do mussels reveal the fate of the oceans?
Prior research has suggested that mussels are a robust indicator of plastic debris and particles in marine environments. A new study says that's not the case because mussels are picky eaters and have an inherent ability to choose and sort their food. Instead, the researchers have discovered that marine aggregates also called ''marine snow,'' play a much bigger role in the fate of the oceans when it comes to plastic debris. (2018-10-23)

Fracking wastewater accumulation found in freshwater mussels' shells
Elevated concentrations of strontium, an element associated with oil and gas wastewaters, have accumulated in the shells of freshwater mussels downstream from fracking wastewater disposal sites, according to researchers from Penn State and Union College. (2018-10-22)

HKBU study: Sunscreen chemicals harm fish embryos and could pose risk to humans
A HKBU has detected an extensive amount of sunscreen chemicals in seawater that could pose a risk to human health. (2018-10-04)

Stretching beyond limits
Novel research optimizes both elasticity and rigidity in the same material without the usual tradeoffs (2018-08-16)

Can seagrass help fight ocean acidification?
Seagrass meadows could play a limited, localized role in alleviating ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems, according to new work led by Carnegie's David Koweek and including Carnegie's Ken Caldeira. (2018-07-31)

Size is key in predicting how calcifying organisms will respond to ocean acidification
New research suggests size is the main factor that predicts how calcifying organisms will respond to ocean acidification. (2018-07-26)

First-time observation of genetic/physiological damage caused by nanoplastics in mussels
Researchers at the UAB, in collaboration with the University of Aveiro, Portugal, were able to confirm for the first time that small concentrations of nanoplastics cause genetic and physiological damage in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The research was recently published in Science of the Total Environment. (2018-07-25)

Choice matters: The environmental costs of producing meat, seafood
A new study appearing online June 11 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment considers which food type is more environmentally costly to produce: livestock, farmed seafood or wild-caught fish. (2018-06-11)

Calculating the impacts of natural events on wildlife
A new method could help scientists understand how wildlife populations are affected by major natural events, such as hurricanes, severe winters, and tsunamis. (2018-03-30)

Four kinds of algal toxins found in San Francisco Bay shellfish
Researchers monitoring San Francisco Bay for algal toxins have found a surprising array of different toxins in the water and in mussels collected from the bay. Four different classes of toxins, including one produced in freshwater environments, occur regularly throughout the bay, according to a study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers. (2018-03-12)

To build up mussels, you need to know your fish
Times are tough for 31 of Michigan's 45 varieties of freshwater mussels. Sporting evocative names like wavy-rayed lampmussel and round pigtoe, these residents of the state's rivers are imperiled by habitat disruption and pollution and are also threatened by climate change. Michigan State University scientists' recommendation to figure out the best places to focus conservation efforts: Worry about fish. (2018-02-27)

Dallas researchers study Texas' first federally endangered mussel species
A team of Texas A&M AgriLife scientists led by Dr. Charles Randklev in Dallas works alongside collaborators to understand the ecology and taxonomy of Texas' first federally endangered mussel species. (2018-02-16)

Substances used in household goods affect the immune system of a coastal mussel
In a study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, researchers from National University of Singapore have determined how perfluoalkyl substances (PFAS) affect the immune system of green mussels. Mussels, and other invertebrates, play an essential role in their ecosystem, and the ocean is the final sink for many pollutants like PFAS, so it is important to monitor regions that may have higher environmental concentrations due to unregulated discharges of these substances. (2018-02-05)

Marine vegetation can mitigate ocean acidification, UCI study finds
Marine plants and seaweeds in shallow coastal ecosystems can play a key role in alleviating the effects of ocean acidification, and their robust population in shoreline environments could help preserve declining shellfish life, according to a study by University of California, Irvine ecologists. (2018-01-22)

Ocean acidification means major changes for California mussels, FSU researcher says
Accelerating ocean acidification could be transforming the fundamental structure of California mussel shells, according to a new report from a Florida State University-led team of scientists. (2018-01-05)

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