Current Myelodysplastic Syndromes News and Events

Current Myelodysplastic Syndromes News and Events, Myelodysplastic Syndromes News Articles.
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How research on chronic illnesses will improve COVID-19 treatment
A new paper in Oxford Open Immunology, published by Oxford University Press, examines prior findings in the field of neuroimmunology that suggest potential treatment strategies for patients suffering long-term symptoms from COVID-19. (2021-02-10)

Sinai team builds first model acute myeloid leukemia progression using CRISPR
A research team led by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (Icahn Mount Sinai) has built the first cellular model to depict the evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), from its early to late stages. By using gene editing technologies to alter genes that make cells malignant, the team was able to identify potential therapeutic targets for early disease stages. The study was reported in the journal Cell Stem Cell in February. (2021-02-10)

Early study points to potential therapeutic avenue for a pair of rare pediatric diseases
Scientists have devised a new approach for detecting and potentially heading off the effects of two rare pediatric diseases before birth. The study, performed in mouse models of the diseases and published today in Cell Reports, represents an important step toward much-needed early interventions for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Silver-Russell syndrome. (2021-02-09)

Unraveling the mystery of Gao, a protein implicated in movement disorders
Scientists at Scripps Research have clarified the workings of a mysterious protein called Gao, which is one of the most abundant proteins in the brain and, when mutated, causes severe movement disorders. (2021-02-02)

Investigational combo therapy shows benefit for TP53 mutant MDS and AML patients
Moffitt Cancer Center is leading a national, multicenter clinical trial investigating a new therapy option for this group of patients. It builds upon the standard of care therapy, combining eprenetapopt (APR-246) with the chemotherapy azacitidine. Results of the phase 1b/2 trial to determine the safety, recommended dose and efficacy of the combination therapy were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. (2021-01-21)

Scientists identify workflow algorithm to predict psychosis
Cleverly combining artificial and human intelligence leads to improved prevention of psychosis in young patients (2021-01-09)

IU research findings could reduce treatment-related complication for blood cancer patients
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center published promising findings today in the New England Journal of Medicine on preventing a common complication to lifesaving blood stem cell transplantation in leukemia. (2021-01-07)

Perspective: Why opioids cannot fix chronic pain
New epidemiological and neuroscientific evidence suggests that the relationship between chronic pain and emotional distress is bidirectional. Pain experts at University of Washington School of Medicine explain the relation in Annals of Family Medicine. (2020-12-22)

Donor stem cell transplant shown to improve survival in older patients with MDS
A new clinical trial offers the most compelling evidence to date that a donor stem cell transplant can improve survival rates for older patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators report at the virtual 62nd American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting. (2020-12-04)

Study in Nature Medicine shows superior patient outcomes in LLS's Beat AML clinical trial
Study in Nature Medicine shows superior outcomes for patients in LLS's paradigm-shifting beat AML clinical trial. (2020-10-27)

More research needed to determine safety of hip and knee steroid injections
Although frequently used to treat painful osteoarthritis of the hip and knee, intra-articular corticosteroid (IACS) injections remain controversial. Questions about whether damage to joints occurs as a result of these injections, which are performed thousands a time each day, persist. (2020-10-20)

RTL1 gene a likely culprit behind temple and Kagami-Ogata syndromes
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that Rtl1, which is a mouse ortholog of the human RTL1 gene, appears to be the major gene responsible for muscle and placental defects in models of Temple and Kagami-Ogata syndromes, which are serious genetic conditions. Theirs is the first study to demonstrate that a domesticated gene that is specific to placental mammals plays an important role in fetal and neonatal muscle development. (2020-10-06)

Effects of acute and chronic graft-versus-myelodysplastic syndrome on long-term outcomes following a
A research group led by Assistant Professor Takaaki Konuma in the Department of Hematology/Oncology, the Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo (IMSUT Hospital) has demonstrated a graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect of a previously unknown/novel allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in MDS patients. In addition, they succeeded in identifying a category of patients for whom the GVT effect was identified. (2020-10-06)

Angina drug fails to improve outcomes after successful revascularisation
Trimetazidine administered after successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) does not improve outcomes in patients with chronic or acute coronary syndromes, according to results of the ATPCI trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020. (2020-08-31)

Pregnant mother's immunity tied to behavioral, emotional challenges for kids with autism
Children with autism born to mothers who had immune conditions during their pregnancy are more likely to have behavioral and emotional problems, a UC Davis Health study has found. Offspring sex may also interact with maternal immune conditions to influence outcomes, particularly in terms of a child's cognition. (2020-08-14)

NUS research breakthrough: CircASXL1-1 regulates BAP1 deubiquitinase activity in leukemia
Researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have identified covalently closed circular RNAs (circRNAs) from key genes involved in leukemia development and provided greater understanding of their roles in haematological malignancies. (2020-08-13)

Identified gene mutations impact on the severity of a type of hematologic cancer
Researchers from Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute participate in an international study that confirms for the first time that mutation of the two TP53 gene's copies is associated with a worse prognosis in myelodysplastic syndromes, a group of blood cancers a more frequent in elderly population. The results of this study have been published in Nature Medicine journal and represent an advance in the diagnosis and treatment of this type of hematological cancer. (2020-08-04)

Cells react differently to genomic imprinting
We inherit half of our genes from each parent. For their function of most genes, it doesn't matter which parent a gene comes from. But this is not true for all genes: about 150 genes are subject to ''genomic imprinting''. They are active either only if inherited from the mother, or only father. Most ''imprinted'' genes are important for our development. Professor Simon Hippenmeyer, IST Austria, shows that brain cells react differently to genomic imprinting. (2020-07-23)

Biomedical instrument based on microvesicles
Researchers have proved that a microvesicle-based instrument can be effective in reducing inflammation and immune response. (2020-07-15)

Mapping the immune landscape of haematological cancers may help to enhance therapies
Activating the immune system of the body is a promising form of treatment for cancer. Researchers at the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital as well as the University of Eastern Finland mapped out the immune landscape of haematological malignancies in a dataset covering more than 10,000 patients to identify drug targets and patient groups which could potentially benefit from immunotherapies. (2020-07-09)

Identified the genetic landscape of myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms
Researchers from the MDS Group of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute and the Munich Leukemia Laboratory map the mutations that can ease and accelerate the diagnosis of Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms rare malignancies. (2020-07-01)

Merits of revascularisation and medical treatment for chronic coronary syndromes
There are two treatment goals for patients with chronic coronary syndromes: reducing the risk of hard outcomes (i.e., death, myocardial infarction) and improving health outcomes (i.e. angina symptoms, quality of life). Several drugs address these objectives, but what about invasive interventions such as coronary angiography and revascularization? (2020-06-25)

New treatment target verification for myelodysplastic syndrome
A Japanese research group analyzed the pathophysiology of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a blood cancer that presents often in the elderly, and found the presence of transcription factor RUNX3, thereby revealing a cancer growth function for what had been considered be a tumor suppressor. Additional analyses of human MDS cells and model mice found an abnormal gene expression mechanism linked to the onset of cancer, and confirmed RUNX3 as a potential therapeutic target. (2020-06-08)

3D facial scans could speed diagnoses for children with rare genetic diseases
Now an international team led by scientists and clinicians from the University of Colorado, University of Calgary, and University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has developed a prototype tool based on three-dimensional (3D) facial imaging that could shorten that diagnostic odyssey by making it easier for clinicians to diagnose genetic syndromes. (2020-06-04)

Certain personality traits may affect risk of 'pre-dementia'
A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society examined five personality traits--neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, and openness--and their links to pre-dementia conditions called motoric cognitive risk (MCR) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) syndromes. (2020-06-03)

Like a molecular knob: That is how a gene controls the electrical activity of the brain
Its name is Foxg1, it is a gene, and its unprecedented role is the protagonist of the discovery just published on the journal Cerebral Cortex. Foxg1 was already known for being a ''master gene'' able to coordinate the action of hundreds of other genes. As this new study reports, the ''excitability'' of neurons, namely their ability to respond to stimuli, communicating between each other and carrying out all their tasks, also depends on this gene. (2020-05-08)

Children born with a cleft lip unlikely to be genetically inclined to do poorly at school
New research has found that children born with a cleft lip, either with or without a cleft palate, are not likely to be genetically predisposed to do less well at school than their peers. The study by the Cleft Collective research team at the University of Bristol is published today in the International Journal of Epidemiology. (2020-05-06)

New MDS subtype proposed based on presence of genetic mutation
In a special report published today in the journal Blood, an international working group of experts in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) proposes -- for the first time -- the recognition of a distinct subtype of MDS based on the presence of a nonheritable genetic mutation that causes the disease. The mutation is found in approximately one in every five patients with MDS. (2020-04-29)

Your football team loses a match. You may suffer a heart attack.
Lost football games may trigger heart attacks in male fans, according to research presented today on EAPC Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'Our study shows that poor results from the local professional football team coincided with more heart attacks in male residents,' said study author Dr. Lukasz Kuzma of the Medical University of Bialystok, Poland. 'The findings suggest that the mental and emotional stress of defeat can provoke cardiac events.' (2020-04-23)

TGF-β-driven reduction of CYGB is associated with oxidative DNA damage of HSCs in NASH
This study shows that the molecular regulatory mechanism of TGF-β-induced downregulation of CYGB expression in human HSCs, leading to the loss of cellular tolerance to exogenous oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage in activated HSCs in human NASH with advanced fibrosis. Our findings provide new insights into the relationship between CYGB expression and the pathophysiology of NASH fibrosis in the human liver. (2020-04-21)

UTSW researchers use snake venom to solve structure of muscle protein
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered the detailed shape of a key protein involved in muscle contraction. (2020-04-15)

Clinicians should consider screening for TSH-R-Abs before pregnancy in patients with history of autoimmune thyroid disorders
Clinicians should consider screening for thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TSH-R-Abs) before pregnancy when the patient has a history of autoimmune thyroid disease or a history of radioactive iodine treatment or thyroidectomy. This is important because Graves' disease, an autoimmune disease caused by TSH-R-Abs, or its treatment, can lead to irreversible impairment in fetal neurodevelopment. A case report is published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-03-23)

Does coronary microvascular spasm exist?
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; Fabian Guenther, Andreas Seitz, Valeria Martínez Pereyra, Raffi Bekeredjian, Udo Sechtem and Peter Ong from the Department of Cardiology, Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus, Stuttgart, Germany consider whether coronary microvascular spasm exists. (2020-03-20)

Impact of postdilation on intervention success and MACE
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0564, the authors consider the impact of postdilation on intervention success and long-term major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) among patients with acute coronary syndromes. (2020-03-19)

UArizona study identifies hormone that causes women to experience more pain than men
A University of Arizona Health Sciences research team led by Dr. Frank Porreca points to prolactin, a neurohormone related to lactation, as the underlying reason women experience more pain than men, and even more so when taking opioids. Their paper on the discovery was featured on the cover of Science Translational Medicine. (2020-03-04)

The CNIO discovers that rapamycin has harmful effects when telomeres are short
The CNIO shows that an anti-aging strategy that extends life in normal mice, the treatment with rapamycin, is harmful when mice have short telomeres. The team addresses for the first time the connections between two of the main biochemical processes associated with ageing: the shortening of telomeres and the ability of cells to detect nutrients. The study reveals thus far unknown basic aspects of one of the main molecular pathways, mTOR, involved in cancer and aging. (2020-03-03)

Mom's gut microbes affect newborn's metabolism, mouse models suggest
Using mouse models, scientists have discovered a mother's gut microbiota may shape the metabolism of her offspring, by providing environmental cues during pregnancy that fine tune energy homeostasis in the newborn's microbiome. (2020-02-27)

Tools used to study human disease reveal coral disease risk factors
In a study published in Scientific Reports, a team of international researchers led by University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa postdoctoral fellow Jamie Caldwell used a statistical technique typically employed in human epidemiology to determine the ecological risk factors affecting the prevalence of two coral diseases--growth anomalies, abnormalities like coral tumors, and white syndromes, infectious diseases similar to flesh eating bacteria. (2020-02-20)

Researchers describe new condition involving numerous GI polyps in cancer survivors
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers report newly discovered condition known as therapy-associated polyposis, or TAP in which childhood cancer survivors develop numerous colorectal growths called polyps. (2020-02-12)

The Lancet Neurology: Discovery could speed diagnosis and treatment of children with life-threatening neurological diseases
A group of life-threatening neurological conditions affecting children have been linked to an antibody which points to potential treatment, according to an observational multicentre study involving 535 children with central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorders and encephalitis, published in The Lancet Neurology journal. (2020-02-10)

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