Current Myogenesis News and Events

Current Myogenesis News and Events, Myogenesis News Articles.
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Damaged muscles don't just die, they regenerate themselves
Researchers building a model of muscle damage in a cultured system found that components leaking from broken muscle fibers activate ''satellite cells,'' which are muscle stem cells. While attempting to identify the activating proteins, they found that metabolic enzymes, such as GAPDH, rapidly activated quiescent satellite cells and accelerated muscle injury regeneration. This is a highly rational and efficient regeneration mechanism, in which the damaged muscle itself activates satellite cells for regeneration. (2020-10-12)

Research reveals insights into bioprinted skeletal muscle tissue models
SUTD collaborates with NTU to provide in-depth analysis of 3D in vitro biomimetic skeletal muscle tissue models, highlighting the great potential of bioprinting technology. (2020-06-09)

Adipogenic progenitors keep muscle stem cells young
In adult skeletal muscle, loss of myofiber integrity caused by mechanical injuries or diseases are repaired by resident muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, which promptly exit from quiescence after disruption of muscle architecture to expand, differentiate and drive tissue regeneration. (2019-10-11)

New insights on triggering muscle formation
A team of scientists led by Lorenzo Puri, M.D., Ph.D., has identified a previously unrecognized step in stem cell-mediated muscle regeneration. The study, published in Genes and Development, provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms that impair muscle stem cells during the age-associated decline in muscle function, and into the connection between accelerated muscle aging and muscular dystrophies. (2017-04-25)

Contact, connect and fuse: An ultra-structural view of the muscle formation process
This work describes the steps and processes governing myoblast fusion with muscle fibres during the formation of flight muscles in Drosophila. The developmental program of these flight muscles and their muscle fibre organisation resemble key aspects of vertebrate skeletal myogenesis. Therefore, this study is likely to contribute to our knowledge of myogenesis in vertebrate skeletal muscles. (2015-11-11)

Sunday driver gene headed the wrong way in inherited muscle diseases
Skeletal muscle cells with unevenly spaced nuclei, or nuclei in the wrong location, are telltale signs of inherited muscle diseases. At the Genetics Society of America Drosophila Research Conference, scientists will report findings from research to determine what goes wrong during myogenesis, the formation and maintenance of muscle tissue, to produce these inherited muscle diseases. (2014-03-26)

Discovery of a 'conductor' in muscle development
A team led by Jean-Francois Cote, researcher at the IRCM, identified a 'conductor' in the development of muscle tissue. The discovery, published online yesterday by the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could have an important impact on the treatment of muscular diseases such as myopathies and muscular dystrophies. (2014-02-25)

JCI early table of contents for April 1, 2013
This release contains summaries, links to PDFs, and contact information for the following newsworthy papers to be published online, April 1, 2013, in the JCI: Loss of MKP-5 promotes muscle regeneration in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy; Alternative fuel for your brain; and many more. (2013-04-01)

Promoting muscle regeneration in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers led by Anton Bennett at Yale University identified the protein MKP-5 as a negative regulator of muscle regeneration. (2013-04-01)

Global conference on stem cell therapy to be held Jan. 25-27, 2012 in New York City
The Seventh International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease is a one-and-a-half day comprehensive program dedicated to the evolving field of cell-based therapies for the repair and regeneration of cardiac and vascular disease, as well as related diseases such as diabetes and stroke. This year's conference will focus on preclinical and clinical studies on the path to commercialization, highlighting the status of molecular, cell, and tissue products in addition to delivery systems. (2011-12-15)

Discovery of new muscle repair gene
An international team of researchers from Leeds, London and Berlin has discovered more about the function of muscle stem cells, thanks to next-generation DNA sequencing techniques. (2011-11-20)

Crucial role for molecule in muscle development
Research led by the University of East Anglia has discovered the crucial role of a molecule in skeletal muscle development. (2011-07-04)

A new way to make reprogrammed stem cells
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have devised a totally new and far more efficient way of generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), immature cells that are able to develop into several different types of cells or tissues in the body. The researchers used fibroblast cells, which are easily obtained from skin biopsies, and could be used to generate patient-specific iPSCs for drug screening and tissue regeneration. (2011-04-07)

Agenda set for upcoming global conference on stem cell therapy to be held Jan. 20-21, 2011
The Sixth International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease (IC3D) is a one-and-a-half day comprehensive program dedicated to the evolving field of cell-based therapies for the repair and regeneration of cardiac and vascular disease, as well as related diseases such as diabetes and stroke. This year's conference will focus on commercialization aspects of the field, highlighting the status of molecular, cell, and tissue products in addition to delivery systems. (2011-01-13)

Agenda set for upcoming global conference on stem cell therapy to be held Jan. 20-21, 2011
The Sixth International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease is a one-and-a-half day comprehensive program dedicated to the evolving field of cell-based therapies for the repair and regeneration of cardiac and vascular disease, as well as related diseases such as diabetes and stroke. This year's conference will focus on commercialization aspects of the field, highlighting the status of molecular, cell and tissue products in addition to delivery systems. (2011-01-05)

Sixth global conference on stem cell therapy to be held Jan. 20-21, 2011, in New York City
The Sixth International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease (IC3D) is a one-and-a-half day comprehensive program dedicated to the evolving field of cell-based therapies for the repair and regeneration of cardiac and vascular disease, as well as related diseases such as diabetes and stroke. This year's conference will focus on commercialization aspects of the field, highlighting the status of molecular, cell, and tissue products in addition to delivery systems. (2010-11-30)

MyoD helps stem cells proliferate in response to muscle injury
The master regulator of muscle differentiation, MyoD, functions early in myogenesis to help stem cells proliferate in response to muscle injury, according to researchers at Case Western Reserve University. The study appears online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Cell Biology. (2010-01-04)

UT Southwestern earns grant from American Heart Association for Cardiac Myogenesis Research Center
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers Drs. Jay Schneider, Joseph Hill and Eric Olson have been awarded a $2 million grant from the American Heart Association to study the development and mechanisms of generating new cardiac muscle cells. (2009-07-20)

Conference on cell therapy includes new session on stem cells for noncardiac organ injury
The 5th International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease will include a new session on stem cells for noncardiac organ injury. The session will include new data on stem cells for islet disease and diabetes, bone marrow cells for stroke patients, and treating Parkinson's disease with bone marrow cells. (2009-01-05)

Agenda set for fifth annual global conference on stem cell therapy Jan. 13-16 in New York
The Fifth International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease, one of the largest of its kind with more than 60 internationally recognized faculty members, is a three-day comprehensive program dedicated to the evolving field of cell-based therapies for cardiac repair and regeneration. (2008-12-08)

5th Annual Global Conference on Stem Cell Therapy to be held Jan. 13-16, 2009, in NYC
The Fifth International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Diseases is a three-day comprehensive program dedicated to the evolving field of cell-based therapies for treating cardiovascular diseases. (2008-11-06)

Oregon researchers find trigger gene for muscle development
University of Oregon scientists say they have identified a gene that is the key switch that allows embryonic cells to form into muscles in zebrafish. (2008-01-31)

Muscle mass: Scientists identify novel mode of transcriptional regulation during myogenesis
In an upcoming issue of G&D, Drs. Maria Divina Deato and Robert Tjian (HHMI, UC Berkeley) reveal that the formation of an alternative transcriptional core promoter complex directs cell-type specific differentiation during myogenesis. The article uncovers a whole new level of transcriptional control of terminal cell differentiation, and will be published online Sept. 1. (2007-08-17)

MicroRNAs, alternative splicing and the muscle proteome
As reported in the January 1 issue of G&D, a UCLA research team led by Dr. Douglas Black has shown how microRNAs regulate alternative splicing during muscle development. (2006-12-31)

Don't move a muscle: Evolutionary insight into myogenesis
In a paper released online ahead of its scheduled December 15 publication date, Dr. Michael Krause (NIH) and colleagues detail the transcription network that drives muscle development in the roundworm C. elegans, and make a strong argument for an evolutionarily conserved program of myogenesis in all animals. (2006-12-06)

Top scientists meet for Global Conference on Stem Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Diseases
The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) brings experts to New York City from around the world for the Third Annual International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Diseases. Dedicated to new advances in this emerging field, the three-day session will feature an in-depth view of cell-based therapies for myocardial repair and regeneration, and cutting-edge research findings. (2006-11-29)

Gene silencing directs muscle-derived stem cells to become bone-forming cells
Using short interfering RNAs to turn off genes that regulate cell differentiation, University of Pittsburgh researchers have demonstrated that they can increase the propensity of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) to become bone-forming cells. Based on these results, the investigators believe that by turning off specific genetic factors they can control the differentiation capacity of MDSCs as a means of treating various musculoskeletal diseases and injuries. (2006-06-01)

Masterminding muscle development
Dr. Lizi Wu (Dana Farber Cancer Institute) and colleagues report on a critical role for one of the three mammalian mastermind genes (Maml1) in myogenesis - assigning that first biological function to the mammalian MAML Notch co-activators. (2006-02-27)

Genetics of muscular dystophy
Various forms of human muscular dystrophy result from mutations in genes encoding proteins of the nuclear envelope. A new paper in the February 15th issue of G&D reveals how. (2006-02-14)

1st International Conference on Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease
This one day symposium will bring together leaders in the field of cardiac myogenesis for presentations on current data in both basic and clinical areas. (2004-06-10)

NIAMS scientists find biochemical 'switch' directs muscle building
Researchers at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and at institutions in California and Italy have found that inhibitors of the enzyme deacetylase can switch the pathway of muscle precursor cells (myoblasts) from simply reproducing themselves to becoming mature cells that form muscle fibers (myotubules). (2002-09-25)

Function follows form in developing myocytes
Cells undergo complex changes in morphology and gene expression as they differentiate, but the relationship between these changes has long been obscure, with hints that cell shape per se can control cellular patterns of gene expression in some cases. Yang et al. now offer a novel example of such control, as well as welcome insights into its molecular basis (2000-11-28)

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