Current Nano News and Events

Current Nano News and Events, Nano News Articles.
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Targeted delivery of highly toxic anti-cancer drug to brain tumors
University of Houston biomedical researcher Sheeren Majd is reporting the development and testing of a new nano-carrier as a potential treatment to deliver highly toxic medicine to glioblastomas, the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumors. (2021-02-23)

Electron cryo-microscopy sheds light on how bioenergy makers are made in our body
Scientists uncover how the body's energy makers are made. A new paper published in Science by Alexey Amunts' laboratory with an international team of researchers reports the molecular mechanism of membrane-tethered protein synthesis in mitochondria. (2021-02-18)

Graphene "nano-origami" creates tiniest microchips yet
A team of experimental physicists at the University of Sussex have developed the smallest microchips ever - 100 times smaller than conventional microchips. They believe that this next generation of microchips could lead to computers and phones running thousands of times faster. (2021-02-15)

Detecting single molecules and diagnosing diseases with a smartphone
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers show that the light emitted by a single molecule can be detected with a low-cost optical setup. Their prototype could facilitate medical diagnostics. (2021-02-12)

Nanowire could provide a stable, easy-to-make superconducting transistor
MIT researchers developed a superconducting nanowire that could enable efficient, easy-to-make electronics. The advance could boost quantum computing, as well as magnetic sensors for applications in brain imaging and telescopes. (2021-02-11)

Nickel phosphide nanoparticle catalyst is the full package
Osaka University researchers prepared a nickel phosphide nanoparticle catalyst on a hydrotalcite support (nano-Ni2P/HT) that showed high activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of D-glucose to D-sorbitol. The catalyst was air-stable, reusable, and effective in water and at 25°C or 1 bar hydrogen gas pressure. Its mild operating conditions will contribute to the low-cost, green, and sustainable production of D-sorbitol for food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. (2021-02-04)

Tiny 3D structures enhance solar cell efficiency
A new method for constructing special solar cells could significantly increase their efficiency. Not only are the cells made up of thin layers, they also consist of specifically arranged nanoblocks. This has been shown in a new study by an international research team led by the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), which was published in the scientific journal ''Nano Letters''. (2021-02-02)

Neurons: 'String of lights' indicates excitation propagation
A type of novel molecular voltage sensor makes it possible to watch nerve cells at work. The principle of the method has been known for some time. However, researchers at the University of Bonn and the University of California in Los Angeles have now succeeded in significantly improving it. It allows the propagation of electrical signals in living nerve cells to be observed with high temporal and spatial resolution. (2021-02-02)

Physicists have developed new material for water desalination
Titanium dioxide nanoparticles decorated by gold absorb about 96% of the solar spectrum and turn it into heat. The material can accelerate the evaporation in desalination plants up to 2.5 times and can track hazardous molecules and compounds. An international research team with representatives from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), ITMO University, and the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, published a related article in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. (2021-02-01)

Wearable sensor monitors health, administers drugs using saliva and tears
A new kind of wearable health device would deliver real-time medical data to those with eye or mouth diseases, according to Huanyu 'Larry' Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics (ESM). (2021-02-01)

Crystal structures in super slow motion
Laser beams are used to change the properties of materials in an extremely precise way. However, the underlying processes generally take place at such unimaginably fast speeds and at such a small scale that they have so far eluded direct observation. Göttingen researchers have now managed to film, for the first time, the laser transformation of a crystal structure with nanometre resolution and in slow motion in an electron microscope. The results were published in Science. (2021-01-22)

Cancer can be precisely diagnosed using a urine test with artificial intelligence
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) announced that the collaborative research team led by Dr. Kwan Hyi Lee from the Biomaterials Research Center and Professor In Gab Jeong from Asan Medical Center developed a technique for diagnosing prostate cancer from urine within only twenty minutes with almost 100% accuracy. The research team developed this technique by introducing a smart AI analysis method to an electrical-signal-based ultrasensitive biosensor. (2021-01-21)

A critical review of graphene quantum dots and their application in biosensors
In a paper published in NANO, researchers from Hubei, China discuss the top-down and bottom-up strategies for the synthesis of Graphene quantum dots (GQDs). The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are summarized. With regard to some important or novel ones, the mechanisms are proposed for reference. In addition, the application of GQDs in biosensors is highlighted in detail. (2021-01-20)

Nano-thin piezoelectrics advance self-powered electronics
Researchers develop a flexible, printable and nano-thin material that can convert mechanical pressure into electrical energy. It's 800% more efficient than other piezoelectrics based on similar non-toxic materials. A significant step towards better wearable tech, new self-powered electronics and even pacemakers powered by heart beats (2021-01-19)

New way to control electrical charge in 2D materials: Put a flake on it
Gaining control of the flow of electrical current through atomically thin materials is important to potential future applications in photovoltaics or computing. Physicists in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered one way to locally add electrical charge to a graphene device. (2021-01-14)

Nanosheet-based electronics could be one drop away
A surprisingly simple method improves 'drop casting' fabrication of tiled nanosheets that could be used in next-generation electronic devices. All you need is a pipette and a hotplate. (2021-01-12)

A safer, less expensive and fast charging aqueous battery
Researchers have developed a new battery anode that overcomes the limitations of lithium-ion batteries and offers a stable, high-performance battery using seawater as the electrolyte. (2021-01-11)

Researchers develop new one-step process for creating self-assembled metamaterials
A team led by University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers has discovered a groundbreaking one-step process for creating materials with unique properties, called metamaterials. (2021-01-11)

Nanocrystals that eradicate bacteria biofilm
POSTECH-UNIST joint research team finds ways to control the surface texture of nanostructures. (2021-01-08)

Researchers turn coal powder into graphite in microwave oven
The University of Wyoming team created an environment in a microwave oven to successfully convert raw coal powder into nano-graphite, which is used as a lubricant and in items ranging from fire extinguishers to lithium ion batteries. (2021-01-06)

Waste to treasure: Crayfish shells to store energy
Other than a spicy night snack, the crayfish has been endowed with greater significance. Prof. ZHU Xifeng's team from University of Science and Technology of China made it possible to use crayfish shell as the biological template for high-performance supercapacitors. (2020-12-21)

New fullerene crystal production method 50 times faster than predecessor
Researchers from Yokohama National University and the University of Electro-Communications in Japan have developed a highly efficient technique for producing a unique fullerene crystal, called fullerene finned-micropillar (FFMP), that is of significant use for next-generation electronics. In a paper published in Scientific Reports in November 2020 (DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-76252-6), the team details how they utilized a small heating apparatus that accepted fullerene and heated it to a temperature of 1,173 Kelvin for about an hour. (2020-12-15)

Double element co-doped carbon quantum dots enhance photocatalytic efficiency
In a paper published in NANO, researchers from Nanjing Tech University proposed a theory which attributes the photocatalytic efficiency enhancement of Phosphorus and Nitrogen co-doped CQDs (PNCQDs)/TiO2 nanosheets composite photocatalyst to the quantum wells of PNCQDs. (2020-12-10)

New method to label and track nano-particles could improve our understanding of plastic pollution
A ground-breaking method to label and track manufactured nano-plastics could signal a paradigm shift in how we understand and care for environments, finds a new study. (2020-12-08)

Cooling electronics efficiently with graphene-enhanced heat pipes
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have found that graphene-based heat pipes can help solve the problems of cooling electronics and power systems used in avionics, data centres, and other power electronics. (2020-12-03)

Game changer in thermoelectric materials could unlock body-heat powered personal devices
A breakthrough improvement in ultra?efficient thermoelectric materials, which can convert heat into electricity and vice versa, has great potential for applications ranging from low-maintenance, solid-state refrigeration to compact, zero-carbon power generation--possibly including small, personal devices powered by the body's own heat. Heat 'harvesting' takes advantage of the free, plentiful heat sources provided by body heat, automobiles, everyday living, and industrial process. (2020-11-28)

Neuromorphic computing with memristors
In a paper published in NANO, researchers study the role of memristors in neuromorphic computing. This novel fundamental electronic component supports the cloning of bio-neural system with low cost and power. (2020-11-27)

Remote control of heat nanosources motion and thermal-induced fluid flows by using light forces
The application of light for simultaneous heating and controlled motion of nano-objects is a great challenge in nanotechnology and science. Scientists from Spain have demonstrated the transport of hot nanoparticles remotely controlled on demand via engineered optical propulsion forces provided by freestyle laser traps. Moreover, they have discovered that the associated thermal-induced fluid flows can be also controlled by this way. This achievement paves a way for further development of micro-robotic optofluidic tools. (2020-11-22)

One-way street for electrons
An international team of physicists, led by researchers of the Universities of Oldenburg and Bremen, Germany, has recorded an ultrafast film of the directed energy transport between neighbouring molecules in a nanomaterial. Theoretical simulations confirmed the experimental finding. The results have been published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-11-20)

New technology allows more precise view of the smallest nanoparticles
Scientists have reported a new optical imaging technology, using a glass side covered with gold nanodiscs that allows them to monitor changes in the transmission of light and determine the characteristics of nanoparticles as small as 25 nanometers in diameter. (2020-11-16)

Scientists use bacteria as micro-3D printers
A team at Aalto University has used bacteria to produce intricately designed three-dimensional objects made of nanocellulose. With their technique, the researchers are able to guide the growth of bacterial colonies through the use of strongly water repellent -- or superhydrophobic -- surfaces. (2020-11-10)

The applications of liquid crystals have been extended to drug encapsulation
Widely used in the manufacture of LCD screens and, more recently, phosphorescent sensors, liquid crystals may also have an important application in biomedicine. An international research group led by the Complutense University of Madrid has leveraged the structure of certain liquid crystal materials to encapsulate and transport water-insoluble compounds with characteristics similar to those of many anti-tumour drugs that are difficult to administer because of their high hydrophobicity. (2020-11-06)

New Danish AI tool provides much-needed help to protein scientists across the world
Sorting huge amounts of data is a bottleneck in protein research, a field that is crucial to make use of the gene-editing technology CRISPR and fully understand diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Now, researchers at the University of Copenhagen have become the first in the world to employ artificial intelligence to do the heavy lifting -- and do so in a way that can ensure common international standards while making advanced protein science more accessible. (2020-11-03)

New analysis method can lead to better cancer drugs
While proteins on the surface of cells are the targets for most drugs, refined methods are needed to analyse how these membrane proteins are organised. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new DNA-based analytical method that could contribute to the development of future drugs for breast and other cancers. The study is published in Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-11-02)

Researchers prove titanate nanotubes composites enhance photocatalysis of hydrogen
In a paper published in NANO, researchers from National Taiwan University examined the photocatalytic performances of titanate nanotubes (TNTs) against commonly-used titanium dioxide (TiO2) and discovered superior performance of TNTs. (2020-10-27)

Good vibrations for new energy
Imagine a mobile phone charger that doesn't need a wireless or mains power source. Or a pacemaker with inbuilt organic energy sources within the human body. Australian researchers led by Flinders University are picking up the challenge of 'scavenging' invisible power from low-frequency vibrations in the surrounding environment, including wind, air or even contact-separation energy (static electricity). (2020-10-21)

Researchers use gold nanorod scattering to identify immune system's 'killer and savior'
Researchers have utilized the scattering of gold nanorods to identify M1 and M2 macrophages. Further development of this technique will lead to a new point of care or a biopsy tool which can predict the stages of manifestation of diseases like cancer, atherosclerosis, and fibrosis just from the simple tissue fluids or blood samples. (2020-10-20)

Boron nitride nanofilms for protection from bacterial and fungal infections
NUST MISIS material scientists have presented antibacterial nano-coatings based on boron nitride, which are highly effective against microbial pathogens (up to 99.99%). They can become a safe alternative to the usual antibiotics in implantology since they do not have typical negative side effects. The results of the work are published in the international scientific journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2020-10-20)

COVID-19 rapid test has successful lab results, research moves to next stages
Rapid detection of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, in about 30 seconds following the test, has had successful preliminary results in Mano Misra's lab at the University of Nevada, Reno. The test uses a nanotube-based electrochemical biosensor, a similar technology that Misra has used in the past for detecting tuberculosis and colorectal cancer as well as detection of biomarkers for food safety (2020-10-14)

Ultra-sensitive nanothermometer under ambient conditions
Nanoscale temperature measurement with high sensitivity is important to studying many phenomena ranging from heat dissipation in nanocircuits to thermal processes in live systems. The most sensitive nanothermometer working under ambient conditions is demonstrated by hybridizing the critical magnetism of magnetic nanoparticles and the ultra-sensitive diamond-based magnetometer. The sensitivity of the hybrid nanothermometer is as high as 76 uK/sqrt(Hz). The ultra-sensitive nanothermometer offers a new tool to investigate thermal processes in nanoscale systems. (2020-10-14)

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