Current Nanoantennas News and Events

Current Nanoantennas News and Events, Nanoantennas News Articles.
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'Soft' nanoparticles give plasmons new potential
Rice University scientists couple gold nanoparticles with soft polymers that pull energy from the gold's plasmonic response to light. That energy can then be used to catalyze chemical reactions. (2020-12-22)

Turning a hot spot into a cold spot: Fano-shaped local-field responses probed by a quantum dot
Optical nanoantennas can convert propagating light to local fields. Scientists in China demonstrate that in the nanogap of a nanoantenna, a local-field hot spot can be turned into a cold spot, and the spectral dispersion of the local-field response can exhibit dynamically tunable Fano lineshapes with nearly vanishing Fano dips. The results may inspire diverse designs of local-field responses with novel spatial distributions, spectral dispersions and temporal dynamics, and expand the available toolbox for nano-optics. (2020-10-08)

Extraordinary modulation of light polarization with dark plasmons in magnetoplasmonic nanocavities
Enhancing magneto-optical effects is crucial for the size reduction of key photonic devices based on non-reciprocal propagation of light and to enable active nanophotonics. In this direction, an international team lead by CIC Nanogune (Spain) theoretically proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel conceptual roadmap to boost magnetization-induced polarization modulation using multipolar dark plasmon modes in asymmetric magnetoplasmonic nanocavities. This new conceptual design could lead to broad applications in optical communications, sensing, and imaging. (2020-06-02)

'Magnonic nanoantennas': optically-inspired computing with spin waves one step closer
A new methodology for generating and manipulating spin waves in nanostructured magnetic materials opens the way to developing nano-processors for extraordinarily quick and energy efficient analog processing of information. (2020-03-05)

Tailoring spontaneous infrared emission of HgTe quantum dots with laser-printed plasmonic arrays
Near-to-mid infrared colloidal quantum dots offer a promising platform towards the realization of many useful devices including emitters, detectors, security and sensor systems. Normally, physics imposes some fundamental limitations at longer wavelengths, and their performance decreases as the radiative emission rate of the quantum dots drops. Scientists from Hong Kong/China, Russia and Australia developed an easy-to-implement plasmonic nanoantenna platform which allows to tailor infrared emission of HgTe quantum dots, making it more bright and uniform. (2020-02-18)

Space-time metasurface makes light reflect only in one direction
Breaking reciprocity is important in optical systems that require asymmetric flow of light, such as full-duplex communication systems and lasers. However, optical nonreciprocity is almost exclusively realized through magneto-optic materials that are incompatible with modern miniaturized photonic system. Researchers at the Pennsylvania State University have demonstrated nonreciprocal light reflection with multi-THz bandwidth based on metasurfaces with ultrafast spatiotemporal phase modulation. This approach highlights a potential way for creating compact and integratable nonreciprocal optical components. (2019-12-20)

Creating switchable plasmons in plastics
Researchers in the Organic Photonics and Nano-optics goup at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics have developed optical nanoantennas made from a conducting polymer. The antennas can be switched on and off, and will make possible a completely new type of controllable nano-optical components. (2019-12-09)

FEFU scientists developed high-precision sensor based on laser-textured gold film
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with colleagues from Russia, Japan, and Australia have developed a multi-purpose sensor based on a specially designed gold film which surface contains millions of parabolic nanoantennas produced by femtosecond laser printing. The sensor identifies molecules at trace concentration detecting them in liquid and gas environments. It can be easily adjusted to provide different modalities including biological studies, medical and security tasks. The related research is published in Nanomaterials. (2019-09-30)

Illinois researchers develop new framework for nanoantenna light absorption
Harnessing light's energy into nanoscale volumes requires novel engineering approaches to overcome a fundamental barrier known as the 'diffraction limit.' However, University of Illinois researchers have breached this barrier by developing nanoantennas that pack the energy captured from light sources. (2019-09-23)

Tiny light box opens new doors into the nanoworld
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a completely new way of capturing, amplifying and linking light to matter at the nanolevel. Using a tiny box, built from stacked atomically thin material, they have succeeded in creating a type of feedback loop in which light and matter become one. The discovery, which was recently published in Nature Nanotechnology, opens up new possibilities in the world of nanophotonics. (2019-06-11)

Novel thermoelectric nanoantenna design for use in solar energy harvesting
In an article published in the SPIE Journal of Nanophotonics (JNP), researchers from a collaboration of three labs in Mexico demonstrate an innovative nanodevice for harvesting solar energy. The paper, 'Thermoelectric efficiency optimization of nanoantennas for solar energy harvesting,' reports that evolutive dipole nanoantennas (EDNs) generate a thermoelectric voltage three times larger than the classic dipole nanoantenna (CDN). (2019-05-03)

AD alloyed nanoantennas for temperature-feedback identification of viruses and explosives
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in collaboration with colleagues from Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS), ITMO University and Swinburne University of Technology (Australia) developed a method for efficient mass production of silicon-germanium fully alloyed nanoantennas. On their basis, optical biosensory platforms and next-generation chemical sensors for fast and accurate tracing of viruses, pollutions, explosives, etc. at low concentrations are expected to appear. Related paper was published in Nanoscale. (2019-04-01)

Researchers create scalable platform for on-chip quantum emitters
Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology and Columbia University have developed a scalable method for creating large numbers of quantum light sources on a chip with unprecedented precision that not only could pave the way for the development of unbreakable cryptographic systems but also quantum computers that can perform complex calculations in seconds that would take normal computers years to finish. (2018-10-29)

Nanodiamond turns into controllable light source
A research group from ITMO University first time in the world developed a controlled light source based on nanodiamond. Experiments have shown that diamond shell doubles the emission speed light sources and helps to control them without any additional nano- and microstructures. This was achieved due to artificially created defects in a diamond crystal lattice. Obtained results are important for the development of quantum computers and optical networks. The work is published in the Nanoscale. (2018-05-02)

Blowin' in the wind -- A source of energy?
It may in the future be possible to harvest energy with the aid of leaves fluttering in the wind. Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University have developed a method and a material that generate an electrical impulse when the light fluctuates from sunshine to shade and vice versa. (2018-03-26)

Researchers invent light-emitting nanoantennas
Scientists from ITMO University developed new effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. Such nanosources are based on subwavelength nanoparticles serving both as emitters and nanoantennas and allow enhancing light emission inherently without additional devices. Moreover, perovskite enables tuning of emission spectra throughout the visible range by varying the composition of the material. This makes the new nanoparticles a promising platform for creating compact optoelectronic devices such as optical chips, light-emitting diodes, or sensors. The results were published in Nano Letters. (2018-02-20)

Nanoantenna arrays power a new generation of fluorescence-based sensors
Researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Bedfordshire, in collaboration with multinational company ABB, have designed and tested a series of plasmonic nanoantenna arrays that could lead to the development of a new generation of ultrasensitive and low-cost fluorescence sensors that could be used to monitor water quality. (2017-10-16)

Getting hold of quantum dot biosensors
Harnessing the nano-tractor-beam like abilities of optical tweezers, researchers from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, developed an all-silicon nanoantenna to trap individual quantum dots suspended in a microfluidic chamber. (2017-08-22)

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials
A team of physicists featuring researchers from MIPT and ITMO University has conducted a comparative analysis of a range of materials to determine if they are applicable to dielectric nanophotonics. Their systematic study produced results that can optimize the use of known materials for building optical nanodevices, as well as encourage the search for new materials with superior properties. (2017-07-21)

Giant enhancement of electromagnetic waves revealed within small dielectric particles
Scientists have done for the first time direct measurements of giant electromagnetic fields, emerging in dielectric particles with the high refractive index at the scattering of electromagnetic waves. (2017-07-07)

New technology of ultrahigh density optical storage researched at Kazan University
The research demonstrates that the homeotropic and planar orientations of the azo-dyes are produced by applying a local DC electrical field and a resonant longitudinal optical near-field, respectively. Near-field Raman dichroism, a characteristic similar to the absorption dichroism used in far-field optics, can be a quantitative indicator of the 3-D molecular orientation of the azo-dye at the nanoscale. (2016-11-30)

What a twist: Silicon nanoantennas turn light around
Scientists at MIPT and their colleagues from ITMO University and the University of Texas at Austin have developed a nonlinear nanoantenna that can be used to scatter light in a desired direction by varying its intensity. The study is important for optoelectronics, as it enables the design of nanodevices for fast (the antenna operates at 250 Gbit/s) and flexible information processing that could be incorporated into the optical computers of the future. (2016-11-16)

Nanostructures made of pure gold
Researchers from TU Wien have discovered a novel way to fabricate pure gold nanostructures using an additive direct-write lithography technique. An electron beam is used to turn an auriferous organic compound into pure gold. This new technique can now be used to create nanostructures, which are needed for many applications in electronics and sensor technology. Just like with a 3-D printer on the nanoscale, almost arbitrary shapes can be created. (2016-11-04)

Nanoantenna lighting-rod effect produces fast optical switches
A team of scientists, led by the University of Southampton, have produced a fast nanoscale optical transistor using gold nanoantenna assisted phase transition. (2016-10-21)

Metamaterial uses light to control its motion
Researchers have designed a device that uses light to manipulate its mechanical properties. The device, which was fabricated using a plasmomechanical metamaterial, operates through a unique mechanism that couples its optical and mechanical resonances, enabling it to oscillate indefinitely using energy absorbed from light. (2016-10-10)

Silicon nanoparticles trained to juggle light
Silicon nanoparticles based devices would allow to transmit, reflect, or scatter incident light in a specified direction, depending on its intensity. They could be integrated into microchips that would enable ultrafast all-optical signal processing in optical communication lines and the next generation optical computers. (2016-08-23)

Hybrid nanoantennas -- next-generation platform for ultradense data recording
A group of scientists from ITMO University in St. Petersburg has put forward a new approach to effective manipulation of light at the nanoscale based on hybrid metal-dielectric nanoantennas. The new technology promises to bring about a new platform for ultradense optical data recording and pave the way to high throughput fabrication of a wide range of optical nanodevices capable of localizing, enhancing and manipulating light at the nanoscale. The results of the study were published in Advanced Materials. (2016-04-27)

Novel nanotechnology technique makes table-top production of flat optics a reality
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a simplified approach to fabricating flat, ultrathin optics. The new approach enables simple etching without the use of acids or hazardous chemical etching agents. (2016-01-27)

Infrared encoding of images with metasurfaces
Researchers at MINAO, a joint lab between The French Aerospace Lab in Palaiseau and the Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures in Marcoussis, have recently demonstrated metamaterial resonators that allow emission in the infrared to be tuned through the geometry of the resonator. (2015-12-24)

Making 3-D objects disappear
Berkeley researchers have devised an ultra-thin invisibility 'skin' cloak that can conform to the shape of an object and conceal it from detection with visible light. Although this cloak is only microscopic in size, the principles behind the technology should enable it to be scaled-up to conceal macroscopic items as well. (2015-09-17)

Doubt cast on recent study claiming to have unraveled the last mystery of electromagnetism
Scientists from ITMO University, Australian National University and Aalto University called into question the results of a study, published by the researchers from Cambridge University in Physical Review Letters. In the original study, the British scientists claimed that they managed to find the missing link in the electromagnetic theory. The findings, according to the scientists, could help decrease the size of antennas in electronic devices, promising a major breakthrough in the field of wireless communications. (2015-09-15)

Superfast fluorescence sets new speed record
Researchers at Duke University have developed a plasmonic device that, combined with semiconductor quantum dots, could one day be turned into an ultrafast light-emitting diode for optical computing. (2015-07-27)

Putting a new spin on plasmonics
Researchers at Finland's Aalto University have discovered a novel way of combining plasmonic and magneto-optical effects. They experimentally demonstrated that patterning of magnetic materials into arrays of nanoscale dots can lead to a very strong and highly controllable modification of the polarization of light when the beam reflects from the array. This discovery could increase the sensitivity of optical components for telecommunication and biosensing applications. (2015-05-07)

Scientists create invisible objects without metamaterial cloaking
Physicists from ITMO University, Ioffe Institute, and Australian National University managed to make homogenous cylindrical objects completely invisible in the microwave range. Contrary to the now prevailing notion of invisibility that relies on metamaterial coatings, the scientists achieved the result using a homogenous object without any additional coating layers. The method is based on a new understanding of electromagnetic wave scattering. The results of the study were published in Scientific Reports. (2015-04-13)

Nano piano's lullaby could mean storage breakthrough
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated the first-ever recording of optically encoded audio onto a non-magnetic plasmonic nanostructure, opening the door to multiple uses in informational processing and archival storage. (2015-03-16)

Optical nanoantennas set the stage for a NEMS lab-on-a-chip revolution
Newly developed tiny antennas, likened to spotlights on the nanoscale, offer the potential to measure food safety, identify pollutants in the air and even quickly diagnose and treat cancer, according to the Australian scientists who created them. In the Journal of Applied Physics, they describe these and other envisioned applications for their nanocubes in 'laboratories-on-a-chip.' (2015-02-24)

Joint international research project leads to a breakthrough in terahertz spectroscopy
Although terahertz spectroscopy has great potential, especially for environmental monitoring and security screening applications, it previously could not be used effectively to study nanocrystals or molecules at extremely low concentrations. An international team led by professor Luca Razzari at the INRS Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Centre has found a solution to this problem by increasing the technique's sensitivity using metallic nanostructures, as explained in an article published in Nano Letters in January 2015. (2015-01-28)

Revving up fluorescence for superfast LEDs
Duke Engineering researchers have made fluorescent molecules emit photons 1,000 times faster than normal -- a record in the field and an important step toward superfast light emitting diodes and quantum cryptography. (2014-10-12)

Symphony of nanoplasmonic and optical resonators produces laser-like light emission
By combining plasmonics and optical microresonators, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created a new optical amplifier (or laser) design, paving the way for power-on-a-chip applications. (2014-08-26)

Seeing a molecule breathe
For the first time, chemists have succeeded in measuring vibrational motion of a single molecule with a femtosecond time resolution. The study reveals how vibration of a single molecule differs from the behavior of larger molecular groups. (2014-08-20)

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