Current Nanodevices News and Events

Current Nanodevices News and Events, Nanodevices News Articles.
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Nano-thin piezoelectrics advance self-powered electronics
Researchers develop a flexible, printable and nano-thin material that can convert mechanical pressure into electrical energy. It's 800% more efficient than other piezoelectrics based on similar non-toxic materials. A significant step towards better wearable tech, new self-powered electronics and even pacemakers powered by heart beats (2021-01-19)

New discovery brings analogue spintronic devices closer
The observation of nonlinearity in electron spin-related processes in graphene makes it easier to transport, manipulate and detect spins, as well as spin-to-charge conversion. It also allows analogue operations such as amplitude modulation and spin amplification. This brings spintronics to the point where regular electronics was after the introduction of the first transistors. These results by University of Groningen physicists were published in the journal Physical Review Applied on 17 December. (2020-12-18)

Scientists explain the paradox of quantum forces in nanodevices
Researchers proposed a new approach to describe the interaction of metals with electromagnetic fluctuations (i.e., with random bursts of electric and magnetic fields). Researchers proposed a new approach to describe the interaction of metals with electromagnetic fluctuations (i.e., with random bursts of electric and magnetic fields). (2020-10-27)

Nanodevices show how living cells change with time, by tracking from the inside
For the first time, scientists have introduced minuscule tracking devices directly into the interior of mammalian cells, giving an unprecedented peek into the processes that govern the beginning of development. (2020-10-20)

Discovery of large family of two-dimensional ferroelectric metals
Recently, a team from University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, led by Prof. Gang Su, discovered 16 novel ferroelectric metals from a large family (2,964) of 2D bimetal phosphates via data-driven machine learning and high-throughput first-principle calculations. (2020-09-28)

A new twist on DNA origami
A team* of scientists from ASU and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) led by Hao Yan, ASU's Milton Glick Professor in the School of Molecular Sciences, and director of the ASU Biodesign Institute's Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics, has just announced the creation of a new type of meta-DNA structures that will open up the fields of optoelectronics (including information storage and encryption) as well as synthetic biology. (2020-09-07)

Experiment confirms liquids show properties of solid bodies at microscopic scales
The collaborators are Kazan Federal University, Vereschagin Institute of High Pressure Physics (Russian Academy of Sciences), Queen Mary University of London, Imperial College London, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Wuhan University of Technology, and Sichuan University. (2020-07-13)

Researchers employ antennas for angstrom displacement sensing
Micro -- nano Optics and Technology Research Group led by Prof. LU Yonghua and Prof. WANG Pei from University of Science and Technology of China realized nanometric displacement measurement through the interaction between the illumination optical field and the optical antennas. (2020-06-28)

Superlens squeezes light into nanospace
Russian and Danish researchers have made a first-ever experimental observation of a plasmon nanojet. This physical phenomenon enables nanoscale focusing of light and, theoretically, allows engineers to bypass one of the fundamental limitations of the ordinary converging lens. Tight compression of light waves is necessary to use them as signal carriers in compact devices that would work much faster than today's electronics. (2020-06-15)

Extraordinary modulation of light polarization with dark plasmons in magnetoplasmonic nanocavities
Enhancing magneto-optical effects is crucial for the size reduction of key photonic devices based on non-reciprocal propagation of light and to enable active nanophotonics. In this direction, an international team lead by CIC Nanogune (Spain) theoretically proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel conceptual roadmap to boost magnetization-induced polarization modulation using multipolar dark plasmon modes in asymmetric magnetoplasmonic nanocavities. This new conceptual design could lead to broad applications in optical communications, sensing, and imaging. (2020-06-02)

Nanodevices show how cells change with time, by tracking from the inside
For the first time, scientists have introduced minuscule tracking devices directly into the interior of mammalian cells, giving an unprecedented peek into the processes that govern the beginning of development. (2020-05-26)

COVID-19: Lessons to learn about the first 4.0 pandemic
Although the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak was officially presented suddenly in the popular market of exotic and wild animals in Wuhan in December 2019, phylogenetic studies state that coronavirus was already present in latency phase since October in this city in the province of Hubei. During this latency phase, the infection followed its silent course and spread among the population in a stochastic way without showing epidemic signs. (2020-05-18)

Nanodevices for the brain could thwart formation of Alzheimer's plaques
Researchers designed a nanodevice with the potential to prevent peptides from forming dangerous plaques in the brain in order to halt development of Alzheimer's disease. (2020-04-30)

Scientists proposed a new approach for efficient nanomaterials' modeling
Researchers proposed a new approach to improve the efficiency of mathematical modeling of the processes in materials at the nanoscale. It is essential for the further development of nanotechnology. The results are presented in an article published in the Q1 journal Mechanics Research Communications. (2020-04-29)

Graphene heterostructures with black phosphorus, arsenic enable new infrared detectors
MIPT scientists and their colleagues from Japan and the U.S. have calculated the parameters of photodetectors comprised by layers of graphene and a combination of black phosphorus and black arsenic. These sensors are able to detect radiation with energy less than the band gap of the constituent layers without graphene. (2020-04-13)

As electronics shrink to nanoscale, will they still be good as gold?
As circuit interconnects shrink to nanoscale, will the pressure caused by thermal expansion when current flows through wires cause gold to behave more like a liquid than a solid -- making nanoelectronics unreliable? Fortunately, research suggests that chip designers can continue to put their faith in gold. (2020-03-26)

A nanoscale device to generate high-power Terahertz waves
Researchers at EPFL have developed a nanodevice, described today in Nature, that operates more than 10 times faster than today's fastest transistors. It enables the generation of high-power terahertz waves. These waves, which are notoriously difficult to produce, are useful in a rich variety of applications ranging from imaging and sensing to high-speed wireless communications. The high-power picosecond operation of these device also hold immense promise to some advanced medical treatment techniques such as cancer therapy. (2020-03-25)

'Magnonic nanoantennas': optically-inspired computing with spin waves one step closer
A new methodology for generating and manipulating spin waves in nanostructured magnetic materials opens the way to developing nano-processors for extraordinarily quick and energy efficient analog processing of information. (2020-03-05)

Generation and manipulation of spin currents for advanced electronic devices
ICN2 researchers, in the framework of the Graphene Flagship, at the UAB campus, demonstrate that spin currents can be generated and manipulated in graphene-based heterostructures at room temperature. The results of this study, published in Nature Materials, provide relevant information on the fundamental physics of the phenomena involved and open the door to new applications, such as the development of ultra-compact electronic and low energy consumption devices and magnetic memories. (2020-01-14)

Small magnets reveal big secrets
An international research team led by a physicist at the University of California, Riverside, has identified a microscopic process of electron spin dynamics in nanoparticles that could impact the design of applications in medicine, quantum computation, and spintronics. (2019-10-25)

Paving a way to achieve unexplored semiconductor nanostructures
A research team of Ehime University paved a way to achieve unexplored III-V semiconductor nanostructures. They grew branched GaAs nanowires with a nontoxic Bi element employing characteristic structural modifications correlated with metallic droplets, as well as crystalline defects and orientations. The finding provides a rational design concept for the creation of semiconductor nanostructures with the concentration of constituents beyond the fundamental limit, making it potentially applicable to novel efficient near-infrared devices and quantum electronics. (2019-10-18)

Double layer of graphene helps to control spin currents
In order to make transistors that operate using the spin of electrons, rather than their charge, it is necessary to find a way of switching spin currents on and off. Furthermore, the lifetime of the spins should at least be equal to the time taken for these electrons to travel through a circuit. University of Groningen scientists have now taken an important step forward by creating a device that meets both of these requirements. (2019-10-17)

A close up on the real world --- atomic migration under ambient conditions
Osaka University researchers have reported an environmental transmission electron microscopy technique that has allowed in situ visualization of the atomic changes of a metal surface in an electric field under ambient conditions. The activation of oxygen gas molecules by electron tunneling was found to result in atomic migration that could be followed progressively. It is hoped that the tunneling-electron-attached-gas process will provide valuable insight for the development of nanoparticle catalyst and quantum material applications. (2019-10-08)

Curved nanochannels allow independent tuning of charge and spin currents
To increase the efficiency of microchips, 3D structures are now being investigated. However, spintronic components, which rely on electron spin rather than charge, are always flat. To investigate how to connect these to 3D electronics, University of Groningen physicist Dr. Kumar Sourav Das created curved spin transport channels. Together with his colleagues, he discovered that this new geometry makes it possible to independently tune charge and spin currents. (2019-09-30)

Scientists develop DNA microcapsules with built-in ion channels
A Research group led by Tokyo Tech reports a way of constructing DNA-based microcapsules that hold great promise for the development of new functional materials and devices. They showed that tiny pores on the surface of these capsules can act as ion channels. Their study will accelerate advances in artificial cell engineering and molecular robotics, as well as nanotechnology itself. (2019-09-18)

Scientists create fully electronic 2-dimensional spin transistors
Physicists from the University of Groningen constructed a two-dimensional spin transistor, in which spin currents were generated by an electric current through graphene. A monolayer of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) was placed on top of graphene to induce charge-to-spin conversion in the graphene. This experimental observation was described in an article in Nano Letters on Sept. 11, 2019. (2019-09-17)

OU physicists show novel Mott state in twisted graphene bilayers at 'magic angle'
A University of Oklahoma physics group sheds light on a novel Mott state observed in twisted graphene bilayers at the 'magic angle' in a recent study just published in Physical Review Letters. OU physicists show the Mott state in graphene bilayers favors ferromagnetic alignment of the electron spins, a phenomenon unheard of in conventional Mott insulators, and a new concept on the novel insulating state observed in twisted graphene bilayers. (2019-06-19)

Russian scientists investigate new materials for Li-ion batteries of miniature sensors
Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) are developing new materials for solid-state thin-film Li-ion batteries for micro and nanodevices. The project is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (RScF). Part of the results obtained at the first stage of the project was published in the journal Coatings, MDPI. (2019-05-29)

University of Barcelona researchers develop new variant of Maxwell's demon at nanoscale
Maxwell's demon is a machine proposed by James Clerk Maxwell in 1897. The hypothetical machine would use thermal fluctuations to obtain energy, apparently violating the second principle of thermodynamics. Now, researchers of the University of Barcelona have presented the first theoretical and experimental solution of a continuous version of Maxwell's demon in a single molecule system. The results, published in the journal Nature Physics, can have applications in other fields, such as biological and quantum systems. (2019-04-17)

The force is with us, always? Tuning quantum vacuum forces from attractive to repulsive
Scientists can put two uncharged metal plates close together in a vacuum, and 'voila!' ---they will attract each other. In 1948, Dutch theoretical physicist Hendrick Casimir first predicted an attractive force responsible for this effect. Scientists have wondered, can there be an equal yet opposite kind of Casimir force? ASU physicist Frank Wilczek has shown for the first time that the Casimir force can be reversed and made repulsive, tunable or enhanced, based on the material inserted in between the plates. (2019-03-04)

DNA Origami full of potent anticancer agents
One of the most successful techniques to combat multidrug resistance in cancer cells is the downregulation of those genes responsible for drug resistance. Chinese scientists have now developed a nanoplatform that selectively delivers small hairpin RNA transcription templates and chemotherapeutics into multidrug-resistant tumors. A deadly cocktail of gene-silencing elements and chemotherapeutic drugs effectively and selectively kills cells, they reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The nanoplatform was assembled using established DNA origami techniques. (2018-11-21)

Graphene bilayer provides efficient transport and control of spins
University of Groningen physicists in collaboration with a theoretical physics group from Universit├Ąt Regensburg have built an optimized bilayer graphene device which displays both long spin lifetimes and electrically controllable spin-lifetime anisotropy. It has the potential for practical applications such as spin-based logic devices. The results were published in Physical Review Letters on 20 September. (2018-09-20)

UT engineers develop first method for controlling nanomotors
Engineers at UT Austin develop world's first method for controlling the motion of nanomotors with simple visible light as the stimulus. (2018-09-19)

Concepts for new switchable plasmonic nanodevices: A magneto-plasmonic nanoscale router and a high-contrast magneto-plasmonic disk modulator controlled by external magnetic fields
Plasmonic waveguides open the possibility to develop dramatically miniaturized optical devices and provide a promising route towards the next-generation of integrated nanophotonic circuits for information processing, optical computing and others. Key elements of nanophotonic circuits are switchable plasmonic routers and plasmonic modulators. Recently Dr. Joachim Herrmann (MBI) and his external collaborators developed new concepts for the realization of such nanodevices. (2018-08-06)

Kirigami-inspired technique manipulates light at the nanoscale
Nanokirigami is based on the ancient arts of origami (making 3D shapes by folding paper) and kirigami (which allows cutting as well as folding) but applied to flat materials at the nanoscale. Now, researchers at MIT and in China have applied this approach to the creation of nanodevices to manipulate light, potentially opening new possibilities for light-based communications, detection, or computational devices. (2018-07-06)

Squeezing light at the nanoscale
Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new technique to squeeze infrared light into ultra-confined spaces, generating an intense, nanoscale antenna that could be used to detect single biomolecules. (2018-06-15)

Density gradient ultracentrifugation for colloidal nanostructures separation and investigation
Density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGUC), as an efficient way of sorting colloidal nanoparticles, can realize the separation according to their differences in chemistry, structure, size and/or morphology. A recent review systematically introduces the development of DGUC in colloid nanoparticles' separation, purification, ultraconcentration and reaction mechanism study. (2018-06-04)

Built for speed: DNA nanomachines take a (rapid) step forward
In a new study, researchers from ASU, University of Michigan, the Wyss Institute, the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and the Department of Biological Chemistry at Harvard describe an innovative DNA walker, capable of rapidly traversing a prepared track. Rather than slow, tentative steps across a surface, the DNA acrobat cartwheels head over heels, covering ground 10- to 100-fold faster than previous devices. (2018-05-07)

Researchers reshape the energy landscape of phonons in nanocrystals
Phonons, which are packets of vibrational waves that propagate in solids, play a key role in condensed matter and are involved in various physical properties of materials. In nanotechnology, for example, they affect light emission and charge transport of nanodevices. As the main source of energy dissipation in solid-state systems, phonons are the ultimate bottleneck that limits the operation of functional nanomaterials. (2018-03-06)

Monitoring positive charges in solar materials
EPFL, PSI and APS scientists have implemented a novel way of detecting positive charges (holes) and their trapping in solar materials. (2018-02-02)

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