Current Nanofibers News and Events

Current Nanofibers News and Events, Nanofibers News Articles.
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Bio-inspired spiral hydrogel fiber qualified to be surgical suture
A team led by Prof. YU Shuhong from the University of Science and Technology of China reported a bio-inspired lotus-fiber-mimetic spiral structure BC hydrogel fiber with high strength, high toughness, excellent biocompatibility, good stretchability, and high energy dissipation. (2021-01-14)

Bionic idea boosts lithium-ion extraction
Chinese researchers from Prof. WEN Liping's team at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry and Prof. ZHANG Qianfan's team from Beihang University have recently made progress in the preparation and application of a bioinspired material that is capable of achieving controlled ion transport and sieving, especially for lithium-ion extraction. (2020-12-30)

Pulp succeeded in diet? Determining the slenderization of wood pulp
Osaka University scientists devise a system for measuring the quality of nanofibrillation for wood pulp using its natural optical birefringence. This work may lead to clear definition and sophisticated utilization of wooden cellulose nanofibers. (2020-12-17)

Research identifies nanoscale effect of water and mineral content on bone
Researchers conducted the first study of the effect of water and mineral content on collagen fibrils, the essence of bone material, which will aid the development of synthetic materials to mimic bone. (2020-12-03)

Clothing, tattoos could be used to monitor patient health
A shirt that monitors your blood pressure or a pair of socks that can keep track of your cholesterol levels might be just a few years away from becoming reality. In Applied Physics Reviews, researchers examine the use of microfibers and nanofibers as wearable monitors that could keep track of a patient's vital signs. The microfiber- and nanofiber-based technology addresses growing concerns in the medical community about monitoring chronic illnesses as the population ages. (2020-12-01)

Sustainable regenerated isotropic wood
A high-performance sustainable regenerated isotropic wood (RGI-wood) is reported, constructed from surface nanocrystallized wood particles (SNWP) by efficient bottom-up strategy. The obtained RGI-wood exceeds the limitation of the anisotropic, inconsistent mechanical properties, and inflammability of natural wood. Mass production of large-sized RGI-wood was achieved, overcoming the rareness of large-sized natural wood. Through this strategy, a series of functional RGI-wood nanocomposites can also be prepared, which show great potential in diverse applications. (2020-11-30)

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste
Scientists from NUST MISIS have improved the technology of 3D printing from aluminum, having achieved an increase in the hardness of products by 1,5 times. The nanocarbon additive to aluminum powder, which they have developed, obtained from the products of processing associated petroleum gas, will improve the quality of 3D printed aerospace composites. The research results are published in the international scientific journal Composites Communications (2020-11-25)

A filter for environmental remediation
Scientists at Osaka University discovered a new method for producing sodium titanate mats nanostructured in a seaweed-like morphology for filtering heavy metal ions and radioactive materials from water. This work may lead to advances in treating contaminated wastewater. (2020-11-19)

Anions matter
Metal-ion hybrid capacitors combine the properties of capacitors and batteries. One electrode uses the capacitive mechanism, the other the battery-type redox processes. Scientists have now scrutinized the role of anions in the electrolyte. The results, which have been published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, reveal the importance of sulfate anions. Sulfate-based electrolytes gave zinc-ion hybrid capacitors outstanding performance and extra-long operability. (2020-11-13)

Silk fibers improve bioink for 3D-printed artificial tissues and organs
Researchers from Osaka University processed silk fibers into a versatile component of bioink for 3D cell printing technology. Printed objects retain their shape better than those produced without the silk additive, and the cells are not further damaged. This development will help advance regenerative medicine and drug discovery, and potentially reinvigorate the silk industry. (2020-10-08)

Researchers create better material for wearable biosensors
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have used electrospinning to make porous silicone that allows sweat to evaporate. (2020-09-16)

Biomorphic batteries could provide 72x more energy for robots
Like biological fat reserves store energy in animals, a new rechargeable zinc battery integrates into the structure of a robot to provide much more energy, a team led by the University of Michigan has shown. (2020-08-19)

Storing energy in red bricks
Red bricks -- some of the world's cheapest and most familiar building materials -- can be converted into energy storage units that can be charged to hold electricity, like a battery, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis. Chemists have developed a method to make or modify ''smart bricks'' that can store energy until required for powering devices. A proof-of-concept published Aug. 11 in Nature Communications shows a brick directly powering a green LED light. (2020-08-11)

Intranasal vaccine platform has potential for more effective vaccines, fewer side effects
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on vaccine development. As numerous vaccines race through clinical trials, physicians and researchers continue to develop new vaccine technologies to generate the most effective vaccines with the fewest side effects. A new proof-of-concept study by researchers at the University of Chicago and Duke University demonstrates the potential for one such platform, using self-assembling peptide nanofibers tagged with antigens to prime the immune system against a potential invasion. (2020-08-07)

New fabric could help keep you cool in the summer, even without A/C (video)
Air conditioning and other space cooling methods account for about 10% of all electricity consumption in the U.S., according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed a material that cools the wearer without using any electricity. The fabric transfers heat, allows moisture to evaporate from the skin and repels water. (2020-07-29)

Orderly arranged bead-chain ternary nanocomposites for supercapacitors
In a paper published in NANO, a group of researchers from Jiangsu University of Technology, China have developed novel Cu2O-Mn3O4-NiO ternary nanocomposites by electrostatic spinning technology, which improved the performance of supercapacitors electrode materials. (2020-07-17)

Purifying water with the help of wood, bacteria and the sun
According to the United Nations, about one-fifth of the world's population lives in areas where water is scarce. Therefore, technologies to produce clean water from undrinkable sources, such as seawater, river or lake water, and contaminated water, are urgently needed. Now, researchers reporting in Nano Letters have developed a wood-based steam generator that, with the help of bacterial-produced nanomaterials, harnesses solar energy to purify water. (2020-07-08)

Biosynthetic sustainable hierarchical solar steam generator
Nowadays, a team led by Prof. Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report an efficient and sustainable biomimetic hierarchical solar steam generator (HSSG) based on bacterial cellulose (BC) nanocomposites. (2020-07-08)

The lightest shielding material in the world
Empa researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range - and they are unrivalled in terms of weight. (2020-07-02)

Multifunctional nanofiber protects against explosions
Harvard University researchers, in collaboration with the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Soldier Center (CCDC SC) and West Point, have developed a lightweight, multifunctional nanofiber material that can protect wearers from both extreme temperatures and ballistic threats. (2020-06-29)

Nanofiber masks can be sterilized multiple times without filter performance deterioration
There is a worldwide shortage of N95 masks. Scientists tested the effectiveness of reusing masks through disinfection with ethanol. They were able to verify that nanofiber nonwoven masks and filters can be sterilized multiple times at home without deterioration of the particulate collection performance. (2020-06-17)

Unlocking PNA's superpowers for self-assembling nanostructures
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a method for self-assembling nanostructures with gamma-modified peptide nucleic acid, a synthetic mimic of DNA. The process has the potential to impact nanomanufacturing and future biomedical technologies like targeted diagnostics and drug delivery. (2020-06-12)

Three-dimensional chessboards
Scientists at Osaka University develop a liquid-phase method for 3D-printing nanocellulose fibers aligned in multiple directions. This work may help with the development of new smartphone screens or electronics printed on paper. (2020-05-19)

Nanofiber membranes transformed into 3D scaffolds
Researchers combined gas foaming and 3D molding technologies to quickly transform electrospun membranes into complex 3D shapes for biomedical applications. The new approach demonstrates significant improvements in speed and quality compared with other methods, and is the first successful demonstration of formation of 3D neural tissue constructs with an ordered structure through differentiation of human neural progenitor/stem cells on these transformed 3D nanofiber scaffolds. They discuss their work in this week's Applied Physics Reviews. (2020-05-12)

Material manufacturing from particles takes a giant step forward
Tiny fibrils extracted from plants have been getting a lot of attention for their strength. These nanomaterials have shown great promise in outperforming plastics, and even replacing them. A team led by Aalto University has now shown another remarkable property of nanocelluloses: their strong binding properties to form new materials with any particle. (2020-05-11)

Transporting energy through a single molecular nanowire
Photosynthetic systems in nature transport energy very efficiently towards a reaction center, where it is converted into a useful form for the organism. Scientists have been using this as inspiration to learn how to transport energy efficiently in, for example, molecular electronics. Physicist Richard Hildner from the University of Groningen and colleagues have investigated energy transport in an artificial system made from nanofibres. The results were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2020-05-08)

Mats made from nanofibers linked to a red wine chemical could help prevent oxidation
Spoiling foods, souring wine and worsening wounds have a common culprit -- a process called oxidation. Although the ill effects of these chemical reactions can be curtailed by antioxidants, creating a sturdy platform capable of providing prolonged antioxidant activity is an ongoing challenge. (2020-05-06)

Sustainable structural material for plastic substitute
A team lead by Prof. Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report a high-performance sustainable structural material called cellulose nanofiber plate (CNFP) which is constructed from bio-based CNF and ready to replace the plastic in many fields. (2020-05-01)

Spider combs tame unruly nanofibers (video)
Cribellate spiders spin thousands of tiny nanofibers into sticky threads. To keep from getting caught in their own webs, these spiders use a nonstick comb on their back legs. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Nano Materials have patterned an antiadhesive nanostructure inspired by this comb onto a foil surface, creating a handy tool to control sticky lab-made nanomaterials for medical, smart textile and other applications. (2020-04-22)

Hierarchically mesoporous TiO2 materials for energy and environmental applications
Mesoporous TiO2 materials, especially those with hierarchically porous structures, have been shown great potentials in the areas of physics, chemistry and material science, owing to their extraordinarily high surface areas, large pore volumes, tunable pore structures and morphologies, and nanoscale effects. Scientists from Fudan University in China summarize the latest advances in the synthesis of hierarchically mesoporous TiO2 materials for energy and environmental applications, and outline future development directions. (2020-04-14)

Coffee grounds show promise as wood substitute in producing cellulose nanofibers
Researchers at Yokohama National University (YNU) meticulously examined cellulose nanofibers extracted from spent coffee grounds, identifying them as a viable new raw source. The YNU team, led by Izuru Kawamura, an associate professor at the Graduate School of Engineering Science, set out to build upon previous research into extracting cellulose nanofibers from coffee grounds. They published their findings on April 1 in the journal Cellulose. (2020-04-06)

Engineers 3D print soft, rubbery brain implants
MIT engineers are working on developing soft, flexible neural implants that can gently conform to the brain's contours and monitor activity over longer periods, without aggravating surrounding tissue. Such flexible electronics could be softer alternatives to existing metal-based electrodes designed to monitor brain activity, and may also be useful in brain implants that stimulate neural regions to ease symptoms of epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and severe depression. (2020-03-30)

Biophysicists blend incompatible components in one nanofiber
Russian researchers showed the possibility of blending two incompatible components -- a protein and a polymer -- in one electrospun fiber. The study also demonstrates that the resulting mat can gradually release the protein. Blended mats containing proteins are promising for biomedical applications as burn and wound dressings, matrices for drug delivery and release, and in tissue engineering. (2020-03-16)

Exciting apparatus helps atoms see the light
Researchers in the Light-Matter Interactions for Quantum Technologies Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have generated Rydberg atoms - unusually large excited atoms - near nanometer-thin optical fibers. Their findings, published recently in Physical Review Research, mark progress toward a new platform for quantum information processing, which has the potential to revolutionize material and drug discoveries and provide more secure quantum communication. (2020-03-04)

Researchers show what drives a novel, ordered assembly of alternating peptides
A team of researchers has verified that it is possible to engineer two-layered nanofibers consisting of an ordered row of alternating peptides, and has also determined what makes these peptides automatically assemble into this pattern. The fundamental discovery raises the possibility of creating tailored ''ABAB'' peptide nanofibers with a variety of biomedical applications. (2020-02-20)

Crab-shell and seaweed compounds spin into yarns for sustainable and functional materials
Biobased fibres are made from two renewable marine resources and with promise in advanced applications, in wovens and medical materials, among others. The threads draw strength from the crab chitin component and flexibility from seaweed alginate. (2020-01-28)

Membrane inspired by bone and cartilage efficiently produces electricity from saltwater
Inspired by membranes in the body tissues of living organisms, scientists have combined aramid nanofibers used in Kevlar with boron nitride to construct a membrane for harvesting ocean energy that is both strong like bone and suited for ion transport like cartilage. The research, published in Joule, overcomes major design challenges for technologies that harness osmotic energy to generate an eco-friendly and widely available form of renewable energy. (2019-12-18)

Improved 3D nanoprinting technique to build nanoskyscrapers
IBS scientists have improved the 3D nanoprinting process that enables to build precise, self-stacked, tall-and-narrow nanostructures. As shown in their latest publication in Nano Letters, the team also used this technique to produce transparent nanoelectrodes with high optical transmission and controllable conductivity. (2019-12-18)

Empowering mucosal healing with an engineered probiotic
Harvard Wyss Institute researchers developed a living material approach that uses a strain of genetically engineered E.coli Nissle bacteria as a locally acting probiotic. The engineered bacteria produce a network of nanofibers that directly binds to mucus to fill inflamed areas like a patch, shielding them from gut microbes and environmental factors. This probiotic-based therapeutic strategy protected mice against the effects of colitis induced by a chemical agent and promoted mucosal healing. (2019-12-06)

New electrodes could increase efficiency of electric vehicles and aircraft
The rise in popularity of electric vehicles and aircraft presents the possibility of moving away from fossil fuels toward a more sustainable future. While significant technological advancements have dramatically increased the efficiency of these vehicles, there are still several issues standing in the way of widespread adoption. (2019-11-22)

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