Current Nanoparticles News and Events | Page 24

Current Nanoparticles News and Events, Nanoparticles News Articles.
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Sustainable ceramics without a kiln
ETH Zurich material scientists have developed a new method of manufacturing ceramics that does not require the starting materials to be fired. Instead, they are compacted under high pressure at room temperature in a significantly more energy-efficient process. (2017-02-28)

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance
Sometimes, you have to go small to win big. That is the approach a multilab, interdisciplinary team took in using nanoparticles and a novel nanoconfinement system to develop a method to change hydrogen storage properties. (2017-02-24)

Light-driven reaction converts carbon dioxide into fuel
Duke University researchers have developed tiny nanoparticles that help convert carbon dioxide into methane using only ultraviolet light as an energy source. Having found a catalyst that can do this important chemistry using ultraviolet light, the team now hopes to develop a version that would run on natural sunlight, a potential boon to alternative energy. (2017-02-23)

Tiny nanoclusters could solve big problems for lithium-ion batteries
As devices become smaller and more powerful, they require faster, smaller, more stable batteries. University of Illinois chemists have developed a superionic solid that could be the basis of next-generation lithium-ion batteries. Led by chemistry professor Prashant Jain, the researchers described the material -- ultrasmall nanoclusters of copper selenide -- in the journal Nature Communications. (2017-02-20)

Dream of energy-collecting windows is one step closer to reality
Researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Milano-Bicocca are bringing the dream of windows that can efficiently collect solar energy one step closer to reality thanks to high tech silicon nanoparticles. (2017-02-20)

Food additive found in candy, gum could alter digestive cell structure and function
The ability of small intestine cells to absorb nutrients and act as a barrier to pathogens is 'significantly decreased' after chronic exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide, a common food additive found in everything from chewing gum to bread, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2017-02-16)

Plant-made virus shells could deliver drugs directly to cancer cells
Viruses are extremely efficient at targeting and delivering cargo to cells. In the journal ACS Nano, researchers report they have harnessed this well-honed ability -- minus the part that makes us sick -- to develop virus-like nanoparticles to deliver drugs straight to affected cells. In lab tests, they show that one such particle can be produced in plants and it ferries small molecules to cancer cells. (2017-02-15)

Good vibrations help reveal molecular details
Rice University scientists develop a method to obtain structural details on molecules in lipid membranes near gold nanoparticles. Their method, called SABERS, could help researchers who study drug delivery and amyloid interactions implicated in neurodegenerative disease. (2017-02-15)

Nanotechnology based gene editing to eradicate HIV brain reservoir in drug abusers
The study will use nanotechnology with magneto electric nanoparticles (MENPs) to deliver drugs across the blood brain barrier in conjunction with the Cas9/gRNA gene editing strategy that has shown great promise in finding and destroying copies of HIV that have burrowed into the host's genome. (2017-02-15)

CSIC develops a biosensor able to detect HIV only one week after infection
A team from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has developed a biosensor that can detect type 1 HIV during the first week after infection. The experiments, performed on human serum, detect the p24 antigen, a protein present in the HIV-1 virus. This new technology, which has been patented by CSIC, detects the protein at concentrations 100,000 times lower than in current techniques. (2017-02-15)

Using a simple, scalable method, a material that can be used as a sensor is developed
By making use of a source of cellulose, such as newspapers, and sugar to synthesise carbon nanoparticles, researchers in the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry have developed a material that could be used as a sensor as its components respond to various stimuli. For example, the fluorescence they display has been found to increase or diminish in the presence of different metals, so they could be used as materials for detecting them. (2017-02-14)

Turning up the heat for perfect (nano)diamonds
For use in quantum sensing, the bulk nanodiamond crystal surrounding the point defect must be highly perfect. Any deviation from perfection will adversely affect the quantum behavior of the material. Highly perfect nanodiamonds are also quite expensive and difficult to make. A cheaper alternative, say researchers, is to take defect-ridden, low-quality, commercially manufactured diamonds, and then 'heal' them. In APL Materials, they describe a method to heal diamond nanocrystals under high-temperature conditions. (2017-02-14)

Lipid nanoparticles for gene therapy
Twenty-five years have passed since the publication of the first work on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) as a system for delivering drugs. So the European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics has prepared a special edition for which it asked the PharmaNanoGene group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country to produce a piece of work. (2017-02-14)

Don't kill the messenger RNA
Success of new protein-making therapy for hemophilia opens door for treating many other diseases. (2017-02-14)

Luminescence switchable carbon nanodots follow intracellular trafficking and drug delivery
Tiny carbon dots have, for the first time, been applied to intracellular imaging and tracking of drug delivery involving various optical and vibrational spectroscopic-based techniques such as fluorescence, Raman, and hyperspectral imaging. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated, for the first time, that photo luminescent carbon nanoparticles can exhibit reversible switching of their optical properties in cancer cells. (2017-02-13)

Direct radiolabeling of nanomaterials
Positron emission tomography plays a pivotal role for monitoring the distribution and accumulation of radiolabeled nanomaterials in living subjects. The radioactive metals are usually connected to the nanomaterial through an anchor, a so-called chelator, but this chemical binding can be omitted if nanographene is used, as American scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The replacement of chelator-based labeling by intrinsic labeling significantly enhances the bioimaging accuracy and reduces biases. (2017-02-09)

DNA 'barcoding' allows rapid testing of nanoparticles for therapeutic delivery
Using tiny snippets of DNA as 'barcodes,' researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. The technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson's disease. (2017-02-07)

Amélie Juhin wins ESRF Young Scientist award
Amélie Juhin is the winner of the ESRF Young Scientist of the Year 2017. This award is presented every year by the ESRF Users' Organisation to a scientist aged 37 or younger for outstanding work conducted at the ESRF. This prize is seen as encouragement from the ESRF for a young scientist whose work has already been recognized by peers and produced fruitful results. (2017-02-07)

Overcoming hurdles in CRISPR gene editing to improve treatment
The new gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9 holds promise for new treatment of such genetic diseases as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and hemophilia. But to work well, it must be delivered across the cell membrane and into its nucleus, a process that can trigger cell defenses and 'trap' CRISPR/Cas9, reducing its treatment potential. Now, Vincent Rotello's laboratory at UMass Amherst has designed a delivery system using nanoparticles to assist CRISPR/Cas9 across the membrane and avoid entrapment by cellular machinery. (2017-02-07)

A ground-breaking method for screening the most useful nanoparticles for medicine
Researchers from UNIGE UNIFR have devised a rapid screening method to select the most promising nanoparticles, thereby fast-tracking the development of future treatments. In less than a week, they are able to determine whether nanoparticles are compatible or not with the human body -- an analysis that previously required several months of work. This discovery, may well lead to the swift, safe and less expensive development of nanotechnology applied to medicine. (2017-02-03)

Thin, flexible, light-absorbent material for energy and stealth applications
Transparent window coatings that keep buildings and cars cool on sunny days. Devices that could more than triple solar cell efficiencies. Thin, lightweight shields that block thermal detection. These are potential applications for a thin, flexible, light-absorbing material developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego. (2017-02-02)

Scientists determine precise 3-D location, identity of all 23,000 atoms in a nanoparticle
Scientists used one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes to map the precise location and chemical type of 23,000 atoms in an extremely small particle made of iron and platinum. Insights gained from the particle's structure could lead to new ways to improve its magnetic performance for use in high-density, next-generation hard drives. (2017-02-01)

Nanoparticles hitchhiking their way along strands of hair
In shampoo ads, hair always looks like a shiny, smooth surface. But for physicists peering into microscopes, the hair surface looks much more rugged, as it is made of saw-tooth, ratchet-like scales. In a new theoretical study published in EPJ E, Matthias Radtke and Roland Netz have demonstrated that massaging hair can help to apply drug treatment -- encapsulated in nanoparticles trapped in the channels formed around individual hairs -- to the hair roots. (2017-01-27)

NIST updates 'sweet' 1950s separation method to clean nanoparticles from organisms
Giving a 65-year-old laboratory technique a new role, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have performed the cleanest separation to date of synthetic nanoparticles from a living organism. (2017-01-26)

Sound waves create whirlpools to round up tiny signs of disease
Mechanical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a tiny whirlpool that can concentrate nanoparticles using nothing but sound. The innovation could gather proteins and other biological structures from blood or urine samples for future diagnostic devices. (2017-01-26)

Nanoparticle fertilizer could contribute to new 'green revolution'
The 'Green Revolution' of the '60s and '70s has been credited with helping to feed billions around the world, with fertilizers being one of the key drivers spurring the agricultural boom. But in developing countries, the cost of fertilizer remains relatively high and can limit food production. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Nano a simple way to make a benign, more efficient fertilizer that could contribute to a second food revolution. (2017-01-25)

Expanding point-of-care disease diagnostics with ultrasound (video)
Fast, accurate and inexpensive medical tests in a doctor's office are only possible for some conditions. To create new in-office diagnostics for additional diseases, researchers report in the journal ACS Nano a new technique that uses ultrasound to concentrate fluorescently labeled disease biomarkers otherwise impossible to detect with current equipment in an office setting. The markers' signal could someday be analyzed via a smartphone app. (2017-01-25)

Nanoscience twist on centuries-old crop treatment is licensed
Copper compounds have been used to treat crop disease for centuries, but new copper nanoparticles are more effective, better for the environment and reduce the chances of bacteria developing resistance. (2017-01-24)

Noninvasive ultrasound pulses used to precisely tweak rat brain activity
Biomedical engineers at Johns Hopkins report they have worked out a noninvasive way to release and deliver concentrated amounts of a drug to the brain of rats in a temporary, localized manner using ultrasound. (2017-01-23)

Synthetic nanoparticles achieve the complexity of protein molecules
Chemists at Carnegie Mellon have demonstrated that synthetic nanoparticles can achieve the same level of structural complexity, hierarchy and accuracy as biomolecules. The study, published in Science, also reveals the atomic-level mechanisms behind nanoparticle self-assembly, providing an important window into how nanoparticles form. The findings could help guide the construction of nanoparticles, including those that can be used in the creation of computer chips, materials, drugs and drug delivery devices. (2017-01-23)

New, old science combine to make faster medical test
Magnetic nanoparticles are coated with an antibody, then aligned in formation within a magnetic field and tallied under laser optics. The result could lead to speedy diagnoses for infectious diseases. (2017-01-19)

Nanoscale view of energy storage
Through long shifts at the helm of a highly sophisticated microscope, researchers at Stanford recorded reactions at near-atomic-scale resolution. Their success is another step toward building a better battery. (2017-01-16)

Nanoparticle exposure can awaken dormant viruses in the lungs
Nanoparticles from combustion engines can activate viruses that are dormant in in lung tissue cells. This is the result of a study by researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner in the German Center for Lung Researc, which has now been published in the journal Particle and Fibre Toxicology. (2017-01-16)

'Gene-silencing' technique is a game-changer for crop protection
Researchers at the University of Surrey and University of Queensland have developed a revolutionary new crop protection technique which offers an environmentally-friendly alternative to genetically-modified crops and chemical pesticides. (2017-01-11)

First look inside nanoscale catalysts shows 'defects' are useful
Peering for the first time into the workings of tiny chemical catalysts, scientists observed that the 'defective' structure on their edges enhances their reactivity and effectiveness. This finding that could lead to the design of improved catalysts that make industrial chemical processes greener, by decreasing the amount of energy needed for chemical reactions, and preventing the formation of unwanted and potentially hazardous products. (2017-01-11)

A new type of monitoring provides information about the life of bacteria in microdroplets
In the future, it will be possible to carry out tests of new drugs on bacteria much more efficiently using microfluidic devices, since each of the hundreds and thousands of droplets moving through the microchannels can act as separate incubators. So far, however, there has been no quick or accurate method of assessing the oxygen conditions in individual microdroplets. This key obstacle has been overcome at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences. (2017-01-11)

New technique uses immune cells to deliver anti-cancer drugs
Some researchers are working to discover new, safer ways to deliver cancer-fighting drugs to tumors without damaging healthy cells. Others are finding ways to boost the body's own immune system to attack cancer cells. Researchers at Penn State have combined the two approaches by taking biodegradable polymer nanoparticles encapsulated with cancer-fighting drugs and incorporating them into immune cells to create a smart, targeted system to attack cancers of specific types. (2017-01-04)

Nanowire 'inks' enable paper-based printable electronics
Thin films made from silver nanowires are 4,000 times more conductive than films made from other nanoparticle shapes, like spheres or microflakes, says a new study by Duke University researchers. The results indicate that conductive 'inks' made from silver nanowires may create functioning electronic circuits without applying high temperatures, enabling printable electronics on heat-sensitive materials like paper or plastic. (2017-01-03)

The researchers created a tiny laser using nanoparticles
Researchers at Aalto University, Finland are the first to develop a plasmonic nanolaser that operates at visible light frequencies and uses so-called dark lattice modes. (2017-01-03)

A new direction in ophthalmic development: Nanoparticle drug delivery systems
Most ophthalmic diseases are usually treated with topically administered drug formulations (e.g. eye drops). Their main disadvantage is the short time of contact with the eye, which leads to a low degree of absorption of the active substance (less than 5 percent of the drug administered). This requires frequent instillation, which usually leads to a high systemic exposure. (2017-01-02)

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