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Current Nanoparticles News and Events, Nanoparticles News Articles.
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Advance in intense pulsed light sintering opens door to improved electronics manufacturing
Faster production of advanced, flexible electronics is among the potential benefits of a discovery in the area of photonic sintering of silver nanoparticle films. (2016-12-22)

Tattoos mark the spot -- for surgery -- then disappear
Tattoos aren't just for body art. They can have medical applications, too. Doctors are using them on patients to mark an area for future treatment -- particularly for non-melanoma skin cancer such as basal cell carcinoma -- but the inks can cause problems. Now scientists have developed a better solution. In the journal ACS Nano, they report a new ink that glows only under certain light conditions and can disappear altogether after a period of time. (2016-12-21)

Safe and inexpensive hydrogen production as a future energy source
Hydrogen represents an attractive alternative energy source to fossil fuels but hydrogen technology is currently limited by safety issues. A team at Osaka University has achieved hydrogen production from organosilane hydrogen storage materials, which are cheap, non-toxic and stable, using gold nanoparticles supported on hydroxyapatite as a recyclable catalyst. Using this system with on/off switching functionality, hydrogen is produced efficiently at room temperature in air without needing additional energy input. (2016-12-20)

Nanoparticle-based method shows promise in DNA vaccine delivery
Researchers have developed a novel method for delivering therapeutic molecules into cells. The method harnesses gold nanoparticles that are electrically activated, causing them to oscillate and bore holes in cells' outer membranes and allowing key molecules -- such as DNA, RNA, and proteins -- to gain entry. (2016-12-19)

Study: How to keep nanoparticle caterpillars safe from the crows of the immune system
A University of Colorado Cancer Center paper published Dec. 19 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology details how the immune system recognizes nanoparticles, potentially paving the way to counteract or avoid this detection. (2016-12-19)

ERC grant: Getting nanoparticle catalysts into shape
Dr. Beatriz Roldán Cuenya from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum will receive one of the renowned Consolidator Grants from the European Research Council. The funding totals €2 million for five years. The scientist aims to use the money to gain new insights into the catalytic abilities of nanoparticles, particularly how the size, shape and chemical state of the particles change during a catalytic reaction. (2016-12-14)

Study shows nanoparticles could be used to overcome treatment-resistant breast cancer
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have been able to generate multifunctional RNA nanoparticles that could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, potentially making existing treatments more effective in these patients. (2016-12-14)

Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D
To help tackle the challenge of finding effective, inexpensive catalysts for fuel cells, scientists at Brookhaven Lab have produced dynamic, 3-D images that reveal how catalytic nanoparticles evolve as they are processed. (2016-12-08)

UMMS scientist designs lamp light operative photodynamic molecules for tumor therapy
UMass Medical School scientist Gang Han, PhD, and his team have designed a new class of molecules used in photodynamic therapy that are able to direct lamp light deep into tissue to kill cancer tumors. (2016-12-05)

Fast, efficient sperm tails inspire nanobiotechnology
Just like workers in a factory, enzymes can create a final product more efficiently if they are stuck together in one place and pass the raw material from enzyme to enzyme, assembly line-style. That's according to scientists at Cornell University's Baker Institute for Animal Health, the first team to recreate a 10-step biological pathway with all the enzymes tethered to nanoparticles. (2016-12-02)

A method for storing vaccines at room temperature
Several simple and inexpensive techniques make it possible to store antiviral-vaccines at room temperature for several months. This discovery by EPFL researchers and partners could make a difference in inaccessible areas and developing countries where maintaining cold-chain transportation of vaccines is complicated and expensive. (2016-11-30)

Nanotechnology a 'green' approach to treating liver cancer
According to the American Cancer Society, more than 700,000 new cases of liver cancer are diagnosed worldwide each year. Currently, the only cure for the disease is to surgically remove the cancerous part of the liver or transplant the entire organ. However, an international study led by University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers has proven that a new minimally invasive approach targets and destroys precancerous tumor cells in the livers of mice and in vitro human cells. (2016-11-29)

What a twist: Silicon nanoantennas turn light around
Scientists at MIPT and their colleagues from ITMO University and the University of Texas at Austin have developed a nonlinear nanoantenna that can be used to scatter light in a desired direction by varying its intensity. The study is important for optoelectronics, as it enables the design of nanodevices for fast (the antenna operates at 250 Gbit/s) and flexible information processing that could be incorporated into the optical computers of the future. (2016-11-16)

Implantable catalyst against cancer
Assembling a drug from harmless components at the target location, such as a tumor, would help reduce the side effects of treatment. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, British and Malaysian scientists present a new, nontoxic catalyst made of copper nanoparticles that can be used to specifically and selectively assemble building blocks in a living system. It was shown to be possible to make an anti-tumor drug from two benign components in situ. (2016-11-15)

Virginia Tech, CytImmune Sciences create therapy that curbs toxic chemotherapy effects
Virginia Tech scientists have developed a new cancer drug that uses gold nanoparticles created by the biotech firm CytImmune Sciences to deliver paclitaxel -- a commonly used chemotherapy drug directly to a tumor. (2016-11-14)

Possible reason for carcinogenicity of silica dust found
MIPT's scientists partnered with their colleagues from Skoltech in a study that suggests a possible explanation of the toxicity and carcinogenicity , or the 'cancer-causing' properties of silica dust (silicon oxide particles). It turned out that nature defies the predictions of classical chemistry by forming unexpected products of oxidation processes involving silicon nanoparticles. The scientists have shown that silica nanoparticles contain reactive oxygen species that have long been suggested as a possible cause of lung cancer. (2016-11-10)

Water, water -- the two types of liquid water
There are two types of liquid water, according to research carried out by an international scientific collaboration. This new peculiarity adds to the growing list of strange phenomena in what we imagine is a simple substance. The discovery could have implications for making and using nanoparticles as well as in understanding how proteins fold into their working shape in the body or misfold to cause diseases such as Alzheimer's or CJD. (2016-11-10)

Gold nanoparticles help deliver lethal one-two punch to cancer
Tagging gold nanoparticles with a small dose of radiation has helped researchers trace the precious metal as it delivers a drug right into the heart of cancer cells, according to new laboratory research being presented at the 2016 National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference. (2016-11-07)

'Nanoparticle taxicab' materials can identify, collect and transport debris on surfaces
Inspired by proteins that can recognize dangerous microbes and debris, then engulf such material to get rid of it, polymer scientists led by Todd Emrick at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed new polymer-stabilized droplet carriers that can identify and encapsulate nanoparticles for transport in a cell, a kind of 'pick up and drop off' service that represents the first successful translation of this biological process in a materials context. (2016-11-02)

First time physicists observed and quantified tiny nanoparticle crossing lipid membrane
First time physicists observed and quantified tiny gold nanoparticle crossing lipid membrane. Spontaneously translocating lipid-voated hydrophobic gold nanoparticles open doors for new biotechnology applications. This discovery of fast translocation of tiny gold nanoparticles through barriers protecting cells, i.e. lipid bilayer, may raise concerns about safety of nanomaterials for public health and may suggest to revise the security norms at nanoscale bringing attention to the safety of nanomaterials in general. (2016-11-02)

Nanobionic spinach plants can detect explosives
By embedding leaves with carbon nanotubes, MIT engineers have transformed spinach plants into sensors that can detect explosives and wirelessly relay that information to a handheld device similar to a smartphone. This is one of the first demonstrations of engineering electronic systems into plants, an approach known as 'plant nanobionics.' (2016-10-31)

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years
Nanoscience research involves molecules 100 times smaller than cancer cells with the potential to profoundly improve the quality of our health and our lives. Now nine prominent nanoscientists look ahead to what we can expect in the coming decade, and conclude that nanoscience is poised to make important contributions in many areas, including health care, electronics, energy, food and water. (2016-10-26)

New gene-editing technology successfully cures a genetic blood disorder in mice
A next-generation gene-editing system developed by Carnegie Mellon and Yale scientists has cured a genetic blood disorder mice using a simple IV treatment. Unlike the popular CRISPR gene-editing technique, the new technology can be administered to living animals and it significantly decreases unwanted, off-target gene mutations. The findings, reported in Nature Communications, offer a new therapeutic approach to treat genetic diseases of the blood like beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease by targeting faulty genes. (2016-10-26)

Yale scientists edit gene mutations in inherited form of anemia
A Yale-led research team used a new gene editing strategy to correct mutations that cause thalassemia, a form of anemia. Their gene editing technique provided corrections to the mutations and alleviated the disease in mice, the researchers said. The finding could lead to studies of a similar gene therapy to treat people with inherited blood disorders. (2016-10-26)

Nanoparticle vaccinates mice against dengue fever
Every year, more than 350 million people in over 120 countries contact dengue fever, which can cause symptoms ranging from achy muscles and a skin rash to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever, and researchers have struggled to create effective vaccines against dengue virus. Now, a new type of nanoparticle, described in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, effectively vaccinated mice against one of the serotypes and could be created to target all four. (2016-10-20)

Tiny gold particles could be the key to developing a treatment for pancreatic cancer
A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is often a death sentence because chemotherapy and radiation have little impact on the disease. In the US this year, some 53,000 new cases will be diagnosed, and 42,000 patients will die of the disease, according to the National Institutes of Health. But research now being reported in ACS Nano could eventually lead to a new type of treatment based on gold nanoparticles. (2016-10-19)

Development of highly active and stable ammonia synthesis catalyst under low temperatures
Profs. Hosono, Hara, Kitano, Abe and Dr. Inoue found that ruthenium nanoparticles immobilized on calcium amide (Ca(NH2)2) function as an efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis at 300°C and the catalytic activity is more than 10 times higher than that of the highest performance Ru catalysts reported so far. In addition, 3% Ba-doped Ca(NH2)2 supported Ru catalyst exhibited excellent stability during reaction for 700 h (almost 1 month). (2016-10-19)

Methodology advance at HZB: Ionic liquids simplify laser experiments on liquid samples
An HZB team has developed a new approach to conduct photoemission spectroscopy of molecules in solution. This has been difficult up to now because the sample needed to be situated in vacuum -- but liquids evaporate. (2016-10-19)

Can we find more benign nanomaterials?
University of Iowa chemist Sara Mason has won a grant to access a supercomputer network funded by the US National Science Foundation. Mason's group will use its time to better define the atom-to-atom interactions of various nanoparticles, hoping to learn more about the particles' effects on energy, the environment, and human health. (2016-10-18)

Obtaining of silicon nanowires becomes eco-friendly
Scientists from the Faculty of Physics, the Lomonosov Moscow State University have devised a technique of silicon nanowires synthesis. They have managed to do this with the help of metal-assisted etching, where safer and more eco-friendly ammonium fluoride is used instead of hydrofluoric acid. The research results have been published in Nanoscale Research Letters journal. (2016-10-18)

Researchers develop DNA-based single-electron electronic devices
Nature has inspired generations of people, offering a plethora of different materials for innovations. One such material is the molecule of the heritage, or DNA, thanks to its unique self-assembling properties. (2016-10-13)

Silver nanoparticle concentration too low to be harmful in water supply, paper finds
Silver nanoparticles have a wide array of uses, one of which is to treat drinking water for harmful bacteria and viruses. But do silver nanoparticles also kill off potentially beneficial bacteria or cause other harmful effects to water-based ecosystems? A new paper from a team of University of Missouri College of Engineering researchers says that's not the case. (2016-10-13)

Nanoscale engineering transforms particles into 'LEGO-like' building blocks
Researchers have developed a nanoscale engineering method that transforms tiny particles into 'LEGO-like' modular building blocks. (2016-10-10)

'sensing skin' detects cracks, harmful chemicals in structures
Researchers have developed a multi-layered 'sensing skin' to detect corrosive or otherwise harmful substances in structures. The skin can also detect cracks and other structural flaws that are invisible to the naked eye. (2016-10-10)

Application-safe and environmentally friendly development and use of nanomaterials
Thus BfR researchers have found out that pure silver nanoparticles are, following simulated digestion in the stomach and intestine, absorbed in much lower quantities than particles which are digested together with food components. This means that studies based on the pure substance without the food components can lead to a situation where the risks are not assessed correctly. (2016-10-07)

Lowering the heat makes new materials possible while saving energy
A new technology developed by Penn State researchers, called cold sintering process, opens a window on the ability to combine incompatible materials, such as ceramics and plastics, into new, useful compound materials, and to lower the energy cost of many types of manufacturing. (2016-10-05)

'Connectosomes' create gateway for improved chemo delivery, fewer side effects
Engineering researchers have developed a new method that delivers chemotherapy directly and efficiently to individual cells. The approach provides a faster means of targeting and killing cancer cells with significantly lower doses of chemo than conventional drug delivery methods, which could decrease side effects for patients. (2016-10-04)

Sheets like graphene: Tailored chemistry links nanoparticles in stable monolayers
Just like carbon atoms in sheets of graphene, nanoparticles can form stable layers with minimal thicknesses of the diameter of a single nanoparticle. A novel method of linking nanoparticles into such extremely thin films has been developed at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. (2016-10-03)

A 'nano-golf course' to assemble precisely nanoparticules
EPFL researchers have developed a method to place and position hundreds of thousands of nanoparticles very precisely on a one centimeter square surface. This will open new doors in nanotechnologies. (2016-10-03)

University of Illinois researchers quantify drug delivery from nanoparticles inside a cell
For the first time, researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that the success of delivery of drugs from nanoparticles can be quantified inside a cell. Researchers can precisely map the amount of the drug that has been released from the particle at a given point of time. (2016-10-03)

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