Current Nanopores News and Events

Current Nanopores News and Events, Nanopores News Articles.
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Bacterial nanopores open the future of data storage
Bioengineers at EPFL have developed a nanopore-based system that can read data encoded into synthetic macromolecules with higher accuracy and resolution than similar methods on the market. The system is also potentially cheaper and longer-lasting, and overcomes limitations that prevent us from moving away from conventional data storage devices that are rapidly maxing out in capacity and endurance. (2020-12-09)

The world's first DNA 'tricorder' in your pocket
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists have built the first mobile genome sequence analyzer, making DNA analysis portable and accessible anywhere in the world. (2020-12-07)

Study reveals how to improve natural gas production in shale
A new hydrocarbon study contradicts conventional wisdom about how methane is trapped in rock, revealing a new strategy to more easily access the valuable energy resource. (2020-11-12)

Sorting out viruses with machine learning
Researchers at Osaka University created a machine-learning system to identify single viral particles that cause respiratory diseases, including coronavirus, using silicon nanopores. The method does not require labels or reagents and may lead to much cheaper and rapid detection of viruses that cause infectious diseases such as COVID-19. (2020-11-11)

Coating plastics by porous nanofilm
A research team has developed a new method for creating metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films that can be applied to sensors and electric devices. (2020-11-09)

Liquid nanofoam: A game changer for future football helmets
A liquid nanofoam liner undergoing testing could prolong the safe use of football helmets, says a Michigan State University researcher. (2020-10-28)

Stem cell sheets harvested in just two days
POSTECH and Pohang Semyung Christianity Hospital joint research team develops a thermoresponsive nanotopography cell culture platform. (2020-10-08)

New findings pave the way to environmentally friendly supercapacitors
Similar to batteries, supercapacitors are suitable for the repeated storage of electrical energy. TU Graz researchers have presented a particularly safe and sustainable variant of such a supercapacitor in Nature Communications. (2020-10-07)

New method of detecting illnesses including coronavirus and cystic fibrosis
A new and quicker method of diagnosing diseases in patients has been created by researchers. The team has developed a system of examining individual molecules to detect the presence of disease in blood. (2020-09-02)

Real-time monitoring of proteins in the nuclear pore complex
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Biomaterials a high-speed atomic-force microscopy study of protein filaments in the nuclear pore complex. The visualization in real-time of the filaments' dynamics is an important step in our understanding of molecular transport mechanisms between a cell nucleus and its surrounding medium. (2020-07-06)

Ultrathin nanosheets separate harmful ions from water
An international research team, led by Monash University and ANSTO (Australia's Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation), has created an ultrathin membrane with high porosity that can filter potentially harmful ions from water. (2020-06-08)

New 'brick' for nanotechnology: Graphene Nanomesh
Researchers at Japan advanced institute of science and technology (JAIST) successfully fabricated suspended graphene nanomesh (GNM) by using the focused helium ion beam technology. The 2D array of 6nm diameter nanopores were patterned on a large-area suspended graphene uniformly. By systematically controlling the pitch from 15 nm to 50 nm, a series of stable GNM devices were achieved. This technology provides a new approach to explore nanoscale thermal engineering, advanced sensing, and quantum technology. (2020-04-20)

Substances trapped in nanobubbles exhibit unusual properties
Skoltech scientists modeled the behavior of nanobubbles appearing in van der Waals heterostructures and the behavior of substances trapped inside the bubbles. In the future, the new model will help obtain equations of state for substances in nano-volumes, opening up new opportunities for the extraction of hydrocarbons from rock with large amounts of micro- and nanopores. (2020-04-15)

Nanopore reveals shape-shifting enzyme linked to catalysis
University of Groningen scientists observed the characteristics of a single enzyme inside a nanopore. This revealed that the enzyme can exist in four different folded states, or conformers, that play an active role in the reaction mechanism. These results will have consequences for enzyme engineering and the development of inhibitors. The study was published in Nature Chemistry on April 6. (2020-04-06)

A nanoscale laser made of gold and zinc oxide
Tiny particles composed of metals and semiconductors could serve as light sources in components of future optical computers, as they are able to precisely localize and extremely amplify incident laser light. A team from Germany and Sweden led by Prof. Dr. Christoph Lienau and Dr. Jin-Hui Zhong from the University of Oldenburg has now explained for the first time how this process works. The study is published in the current issue of the journal Nature Communications. (2020-03-19)

3D hierarchically porous nanostructured catalyst helps efficiently reduce CO2?
KAIST researchers developed a three-dimensional (3D) hierarchically porous nanostructured catalyst with carbon dioxide (CO2) to carbon monoxide (CO) conversion rate up to 3.96 times higher than that of conventional nanoporous gold catalysts. (2020-03-13)

Laser writing enables practical flat optics and data storage in glass
Femtosecond laser machining has emerged as an attractive technology enabling appications ranging from eye surgery to direct writing in the bulk of transparent materials. Scientists from the University of Southampton, UK, demonstrated a new regime of ultrafast laser writing in silica glass, which produces anisotropic nanostructures and related birefrigence with negligible transmission loss. The technology enables practical wavefront shaping with flat optics and polarization beam shaping of high power lasers from ultraviolet to infrared, as well as high-capacity optical data storage. (2020-02-19)

Scientists develop molecular 'fishing' to find individual molecules in blood
Like finding a needle in a haystack, Liviu Movileanu can find a single molecule in blood. (2020-02-15)

University of Ottawa tool to democratize nanopore research
A team of researchers at the University of Ottawa is democratizing entry into the field of nanopore research by offering up a unique tool to accelerate the development of new applications and discoveries. The innovative T.-Cossa Lab came up with the idea to provide the research community with the protocols, hardware designs, and software required to fabricate solid-state nanopores in a fast, low cost, and completely automated fashion. This method is available in Nature Protocols. (2020-01-14)

Nanopores can identify the amino acids in proteins, the first step to sequencing
While DNA sequencing is a useful tool for determining what's going on in a cell or a person's body, it only tells part of the story. Protein sequencing could soon give researchers a wider window into a cell's workings. A new study demonstrates that nanopores can be used to identify all 20 amino acids in proteins, a major step toward protein sequencing. (2019-12-18)

Researchers create synthetic nanopores made from DNA
A scientific collaboration led by researchers at iNANO/Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University and the Department of Chemistry at the University of Copenhagen has resulted in the construction of a synthetic DNA nanopore capable of selectively translocating protein-size macromolecules across lipid bilayers. (2019-12-13)

Chemists' surprising discovery of nanoconfined reactions could aid catalytic design
Georgia State University chemistry researchers have unlocked one of the mysteries of catalytic reactions on a microscopic scale, allowing for the design of more efficient industrial processes. (2019-11-06)

Turning a dangerous toxin into a biosensor
Some bacteria release a toxin that forms pores on other cells. EPFL scientists have studied the pore-forming toxin aerolysin and genetically engineered it to be used as a high-resolution sensor for biological molecules like DNA and proteins. (2019-10-29)

Quantum destabilization of a water sandwich
When a thin layer of water is squeezed between two hydrophobic surfaces, the laws of classical physics break down. (2019-09-24)

New insulation technique paves the way for more powerful and smaller chips
Researchers at KU Leuven and imec (Belgium) have successfully developed a new technique to insulate microchips. The technique uses metal-organic frameworks, a new type of materials consisting of structured nanopores. In the long term, this method can be used for the development of even smaller and more powerful chips that consume less energy. The team has received an ERC Proof of Concept grant to further their research. (2019-09-04)

Optofluidic chip with nanopore 'smart gate' developed for single molecule analysis
A new chip-based platform developed by researchers at UC Santa Cruz integrates nanopores and optofluidic technology with a feedback-control circuit to enable an unprecedented level of control over individual molecules and particles on a chip for high-throughput analysis. (2019-08-16)

Researchers embrace imperfection to improve biomolecule transport
While watching the production of porous membranes used for DNA sorting and sequencing, University of Illinois researchers wondered how tiny steplike defects formed during fabrication could be used to improve molecule transport. They found that the defects -- formed by overlapping layers of membrane -- make a big difference in how molecules move along a membrane surface. Instead of trying to fix these flaws, the team set out to use them to help direct molecules into the membrane pores. (2019-08-05)

Adding a polymer stabilizes collapsing metal-organic frameworks
Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have many applications like carbon capture and water-cleaning. However, MOFs with large pores tend to collapse. Chemists and chemical engineers at EPFL have now solved the problem by adding small amounts of a polymer into the MOF pores, an act that impedes pore collapse. (2019-07-18)

Developing a new type of refrigeration via force-driven liquid gas transition
A research team of Tohoku University, Nissan Motor Co., Shinshu University, and Okayama University made a groundbreaking discovery in the quest to replace hydrofluorocarbons in refrigeration systems with natural refrigerants such as water and alcohol. Their study involved carrying-out a liquid-to-gas phase transition via a nanosponge, a soft, elastic material equipped with small nanopores less than 10 nanometers. Their findings could lead to more efficient refrigerants with a smaller carbon footprint. (2019-06-19)

Producing electricity at estuaries using light and osmosis
Researchers at EPFL are working on a technology to exploit osmotic energy -- a source of power that's naturally available at estuaries, where fresh water comes into contact with seawater. In a laboratory experiment, the team reproduced the real-world conditions that occur where rivers meet the sea (pH and salt concentration) and showed that, by shining light on a system comprising salt, water and a membrane three atoms thick, it was possible to optimize electricity production. (2019-05-23)

Improving carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks
EPFL chemical engineers have designed an easy method to achieve commercially attractive carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks. (2019-05-16)

Liquid crystals in nanopores produce a surprisingly large negative pressure
Negative pressure governs not only the Universe or the quantum vacuum. This phenomenon, although of a different nature, appears also in liquid crystals confined in nanopores. At the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, a method has been presented that for the first time makes it possible to estimate the amount of negative pressure in spatially limited liquid crystal systems. (2019-04-24)

Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system
A research group led by a scientist of the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has gained important insights into how the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the gene responsible for their development. (2019-04-18)

Introducing a kinder, gentler way to blow holes in cells
Getting big molecules into cells isn't easy, and it isn't easy on the cells, either. Bulk electroporation blows holes throughout the cell and can kill many of them. Viruses like AAV have limited capacity for macromolecules like Cas9, and lentivirus has safety issues. A new, gentler form of electroporation, called nanoEP, causes less trauma to cells and is more efficient, potentially boosting delivery of large molecules for gene editing or CAR T-cell immunotherapy. (2019-03-28)

X-ray analysis of carbon nanostructures helps material design
Nanostructures made of carbon are extremely versatile: they can absorb ions in batteries and supercapacitors, store gases, and desalinate water. How well they cope with the task at hand depends largely on the structural features of the nanopores. A new study from the HZB has now shown that structural changes that occur due to morphology transition with increasing temperature of the synthesis can also be measured directly -- using small-angle X-ray scattering. The results have now been published in the journal Carbon. (2019-03-13)

With nanopore sensing, VCU physics researchers detect subtle changes in single particles
Researchers in Virginia Commonwealth University's Department of Physics have discovered that a technique known as nanopore sensing can be used to detect subtle changes in clusters, or extremely small chunks of matter that are bigger than a molecule but smaller than a solid. (2019-02-21)

Nanopores make portable mass spectrometer for peptides a reality
University of Groningen scientists have developed nanopores that can be used to directly measure the mass of peptides. Although the resolution needs to be improved, this proof of principle shows that a cheap and portable peptide mass spectrometer can be constructed using existing nanopore technology and the patented pores that were developed in the lab of UG Associate Professor of Chemical Biology, Giovanni Maglia. This discovery was published in Nature Communications on 19 February. (2019-02-19)

Mechanism helps explain the ear's exquisite sensitivity
Researchers at MIT decode the way structures in the inner ear give our hearing its remarkable sensitivity and selectivity. (2019-01-16)

How low can we go? Nanopore detection of single flu viruses to control outbreaks
Influenza is a highly contagious respiratory disease that may cause a serious outbreak at any time. Here, an Osaka University-led research team developed a new nanosensor to detect single flu virus particles in a variety of samples. The method is quick, simple, and does not require specific training or expertise. This could help clinicians and public health agencies to control nascent flu outbreaks. (2018-11-21)

Pore size alone does not matter when biological nanopores act as sugar chain biosensors
Protein nanopores can be found naturally in cell membranes, and act as biological gateways. Yet they can also be useful for the detection of specific bioactive molecular chains, like sugar chains, which are responsible for key interactions at the cell level, such as molecules from the glycosaminoglycan family. (2018-11-08)

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