Current Nanotechnology News and Events

Current Nanotechnology News and Events, Nanotechnology News Articles.
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The invisible killer lurking in our consumer products
Our consumer products, such as food, cosmetics and clothes, might be filled with nanomaterials - unbeknownst to us. The use of nanomaterials remains unregulated and they do not show up in lists of ingredients. A new study published in Nature Communications sheds light on whether they are harmful and what happens to them when they enter an organism. (2021-02-09)

Biomaterials could mean better vaccines, virus-fighting surfaces
Advances in the fields of biomaterials and nanotechnology could lead to big breakthroughs in the fight against dangerous viruses like the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. In APL Bioengineering, researchers from the Indian Institute of Science describe possibilities being explored by scientists, combining biomaterials and nanotechnology, to make vaccines more effective and build surfaces that could fight and kill viruses on their own. (2021-02-09)

SARS-CoV-2 under the helium ion microscope for the first time
Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Physics have succeeded for the first time in imaging the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus with a helium ion microscope. In contrast to the more conventional electron microscopy, the samples do not need a thin metal coating in helium ion microscopy. This allows interactions between the coronaviruses and their host cell to be observed particularly clearly. The findings have been published in the Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology. (2021-02-04)

Zebra stripes, leopard spots: frozen metal patterns defy conventional metallurgy
''Stripy zebra, spotty leopard...'' Pattern formation and pattern recognition entertains children and scientists alike. Alan Turing's 1950s model explaining patterns in two-substance systems is used by metallurgists to explain microscopic internal stripes and spots. A study out today explains exotic patterns, counter to Turing's theory, forming on the liquid metal gallium, which melts in the hand. The previously ignored surface-solidification phenomenon improves fundamental understanding of liquid-metal alloys, with a potential patterning tool, and advanced applications in future electronics and optics. (2021-01-18)

When less is more: A single layer of atoms boosts the nonlinear generation of light
A wide array of technologies, ranging from lasers and optical telecommunication to quantum computing rely on nonlinear optical interaction. Typically, these nonlinear interactions, which allow a beam of light, for example, to change its frequency, are implemented by bulk materials. (2020-12-14)

Phytoplankton disturbed by nanoparticles
Products derived from nanotechnology are efficient and highly sought-after, yet their effects on the environment are still poorly understood. A research team from the University of Geneva have investigated the effects of nanosilver, currently used in almost 450 products for its antibacterial properties, on the algae known as Poterioochromonas malhamensis. The results show that nanosilver disturb the alga's entire metabolism. Its membrane becomes more permeable, the cellular ROS increases and photosynthesis is less effective. (2020-11-25)

Quantum nanodiamonds may help detect disease earlier
The quantum sensing abilities of nanodiamonds can be used to improve the sensitivity of paper-based diagnostic tests, potentially allowing for earlier detection of diseases such as HIV, according to a study led by UCL researchers in the i-sense McKendry group. (2020-11-25)

A biomimetic membrane for desalinating seawater on an industrial scale
Reverse osmosis is one of the most widely used techniques for the desalination of water. Some of the membranes currently used are artificial channels of water inserted into lipid layers. But their large-scale performance is not satisfactory. An international team has developed a hybrid strategy, which consists of combining a polyamide matrix and artificial water channels into a single structure. Their membranes have been tested under industrial conditions and outperform conventional membranes. (2020-11-09)

New analysis method can lead to better cancer drugs
While proteins on the surface of cells are the targets for most drugs, refined methods are needed to analyse how these membrane proteins are organised. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new DNA-based analytical method that could contribute to the development of future drugs for breast and other cancers. The study is published in Nature Nanotechnology. (2020-11-02)

Scientists explain the paradox of quantum forces in nanodevices
Researchers proposed a new approach to describe the interaction of metals with electromagnetic fluctuations (i.e., with random bursts of electric and magnetic fields). Researchers proposed a new approach to describe the interaction of metals with electromagnetic fluctuations (i.e., with random bursts of electric and magnetic fields). (2020-10-27)

Coming soon to a circuit near you
We know that DNA molecules express heredity through genetic information. However, in the past few years, scientists have discovered that DNA can conduct electrical currents. This makes it an interesting candidate for roles that nature did not intend for this molecule, such as smaller, faster and cheaper electric circuits in electronic devices, and to detect the early stages of diseases like cancer and COVID-19. (2020-09-29)

New method to design diamond lattices and other crystals from microscopic building blocks
In a new study appearing in the journal Physical Review Letters, researchers describe a technique for using LEGO®-like elements at the scale of a few billionths of a meter. Further, they are able to cajole these design elements to self-assemble, with each LEGO® piece identifying its proper mate and linking up in a precise sequence to complete the desired nanostructure. (2020-09-14)

Inexpensive, non-toxic nanofluid could be a game-changer for oil recovery
Researchers from the University of Houston have demonstrated that an inexpensive and non-toxic nanofluid can be used to efficiently recover even heavy oil with high viscosity from reservoirs. (2020-09-10)

Regulation of cancer stemness by the best combination of nanotech and genetic engineering
Photo-active nanocomplexes are successfully developed. The nanocomplexes allow spatiotemporal controlling genetically-engineered cells that are overexpressing temperature-sensitive membrane proteins. The technology demonstrates effective cancer elimination and dramatic suppression of cancer stemness in cells and mice. (2020-08-17)

How to get more cancer-fighting nanoparticles to where they are needed
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have discovered a dose threshold that greatly increases the delivery of cancer-fighting drugs into a tumour. (2020-08-10)

Trapping tiny particles: A versatile tool for nanomanipulation
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University have developed a novel device for single nanoparticle trapping, which has potential applications for drug discovery, disease monitoring, biomedical imaging, and more. (2020-07-26)

A nanomaterial path forward for COVID-19 vaccine development
From mRNA vaccines entering clinical trials, to peptide-based vaccines and using molecular farming to scale vaccine production, the COVID-19 pandemic is pushing new and emerging nanotechnologies into the frontlines and the headlines. Nanoengineers at UC San Diego detail the current approaches to COVID-19 vaccine development, and highlight how nanotechnology has enabled these advances, in a review article in Nature Nanotechnology published July 15. (2020-07-15)

Designing DNA from scratch: Engineering the functions of micrometer-sized DNA droplets
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have constructed ''DNA droplets'' comprising designed DNA nanostructures. The droplets exhibit dynamic functions such as fusion, fission, Janus-shape formation, and protein capture. Their technique is expected to be applicable to a wide variety of biomaterials, opening doors to many promising applications in materials design, drug delivery, and even artificial cell-like molecular systems. (2020-07-15)

Melting a crystal topologically
Physicists at EPFL have successfully melted a very thin crystal of magnetic quasi-particles controllably, as turning ice into water. Novel phases of matter have been discovered and a new model system for fundamental physics studies has been established. (2020-06-15)

Unlocking PNA's superpowers for self-assembling nanostructures
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a method for self-assembling nanostructures with gamma-modified peptide nucleic acid, a synthetic mimic of DNA. The process has the potential to impact nanomanufacturing and future biomedical technologies like targeted diagnostics and drug delivery. (2020-06-12)

Spontaneous formation of nanoscale hollow structures could boost battery storage
An unexpected property of nanometer-scale antimony crystals -- the spontaneous formation of hollow structures -- could help give the next generation of lithium ion batteries higher energy density without reducing battery lifetime. The reversibly hollowing structures could allow lithium ion batteries to hold more energy and therefore provide more power between charges. (2020-06-08)

Advances in nanoparticles as anticancer drug delivery vector: Need of this century
This review article provides a summary of current advances in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) as anticancer drug-delivery vectors. (2020-06-04)

Solar hydrogen production: Splitting water with UV is now at almost 100% quantum efficiency
Scientists in Japan successfully split water into hydrogen and oxygen using light and meticulously designed catalysts, and they did so at the maximum efficiency meaning there was almost no loss and undesired side reactions. This latest breakthrough in solar hydrogen production makes the likelihood of scalable, economically viable hydrogen production more than likely, paving the way for humanity to make the switch to clean energy. (2020-06-03)

Cancer care model could help us cope with COVID-19, says nanomedicine expert
As the UK government looks for an exit strategy to Britain's COVID-19 lockdown a nanomedicine expert from The University of Manchester believes a care model usually applied to cancer patients could provide a constructive way forward. Professor Kostas Kostarelos says we should view the COVID-19 pandemic -- or any future virus outbreak -- more like a chronic disease, such as cancer, and it should be managed as such to help society better cope with the impact. (2020-04-27)

Penn Engineers' 'nanocardboard' flyers could serve as martian atmospheric probes
Penn Engineers are suggesting a new way to explore the sky: tiny aircraft that weigh about as much as a fruit fly and have no moving parts. These flyers are plates of 'nanocardboard,' which levitate when bright light is shone on them. As one side heats up, the temperature differential gets air circulating through its hollow structure and shooting out of the corrugated channels that give it its name, thrusting it off the ground. (2020-04-21)

NUS scientists invent symmetry-breaking in a nanoscale device that can mimic human brain
In a paper published in Nature Nanotechnology on March 23, 2020, researchers from the National University of Singapore reported the invention of a nanoscale device based on a unique material platform that can achieve optimal digital in-memory computing while being extremely energy efficient. The invention is also highly reproduceable and durable, unlike conventional organic electronic devices. (2020-03-23)

This wearable device camouflages its wearer no matter the weather
Researchers at the University of California San Diego developed a wearable technology that can hide its wearer from heat-detecting sensors such as night vision goggles, even when the ambient temperature changes -- a feat that current state of the art technology cannot match. The technology can adapt to temperature changes in just a few minutes, while keeping the wearer comfortable. (2020-03-03)

SUWA: A hyperstable artificial protein that does not denature in high temperatures above 100°C
Successful development of a highly stable artificial protein that only denatures at 122 °C. Named SUWA, the little protein nanobuliding block pillars are like the lumber poles used in the Onbashira Matsuri which are used to build the holy shrines of Suwa Taisha. Withstanding heat, the hope is that these artificial proteins will be used in nanotechnology and synthetic biology. (2020-02-28)

New study allows brain and artificial neurons to link up over the web
Research on novel nanoelectronics devices led by the University of Southampton enabled brain neurons and artificial neurons to communicate with each other over the Internet. (2020-02-26)

Gold nanoparticles detect signals from cancer cells
A novel blood test that uses gold nanoparticles to detect cancer has also been shown to identify signals released by cancer cells. The technology could enable earlier diagnosis and better treatment. (2020-02-26)

Technique can label many specific DNAs, RNAs, or proteins in a single tissue sample
A new technique can label diverse molecules and amplify the signal to help researchers spot those that are especially rare. Called SABER (signal amplification by exchange reaction), Peng Yin's lab at Harvard's Wyss Institute first introduced this method last year and since have found ways to apply it to proteins, DNA and RNA. (2020-02-15)

Dialing up the heat on nanoparticles
Rapid progress in the field of metallic nanotechnology is sparking a science revolution that is likely to impact all areas of society, according to professor of physics Ventsislav Valev and his team at the University of Bath in the UK. (2020-01-20)

Generation and manipulation of spin currents for advanced electronic devices
ICN2 researchers, in the framework of the Graphene Flagship, at the UAB campus, demonstrate that spin currents can be generated and manipulated in graphene-based heterostructures at room temperature. The results of this study, published in Nature Materials, provide relevant information on the fundamental physics of the phenomena involved and open the door to new applications, such as the development of ultra-compact electronic and low energy consumption devices and magnetic memories. (2020-01-14)

Complete filling of batches of nanopipettes
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Analytical Chemistry an efficient method for filling a batch of nanopipettes with a pore opening below 10 nanometer. The method is based on the application of a temperature gradient to the nanopipette tips so that residual air bubbles are driven out. (2020-01-08)

Nanoparticle therapeutic restores tumor suppressor, sensitizes cancer cells to treatment
Leveraging advancements in nanotechnology, investigators from the Brigham have found that restoring p53 not only delays the growth of p53-deficient liver and lung cancer cells but may also make tumors more vulnerable to cancer drugs known as mTOR inhibitors. (2019-12-23)

Hiring antibodies as nanotechnology builders
Researchers at the University of Rome Tor Vergata recruit antibodies as molecular builders to assemble nanoscale structures made of synthetic DNA. (2019-12-03)

Healing power of honey
Sandwiching nano-layers of manuka honey between layers of surgical mesh inhibits bacteria for up to three weeks as the honey is slowly released, new research shows. (2019-12-03)

Suspended layers make a special superconductor
In superconducting materials, an electric current will flow without any resistance. There are quite a few practical applications of this phenomenon; however, many fundamental questions remain as yet unanswered. Associate Professor Justin Ye, head of the Device Physics of Complex Materials group at the University of Groningen, studied superconductivity in a double layer of molybdenum disulfide and discovered new superconducting states. The results were published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology on November 4, 2019. (2019-11-04)

These new soft actuators could make soft robots less bulky
Engineers at the University of California have developed a way to build soft robots that are compact, portable and multifunctional. The advance was made possible by creating soft, tubular actuators whose movements are electrically controlled, making them easy to integrate with small electronic components. As a proof of concept, engineers used the new actuators to build an untethered, battery-powered, walking soft robot and a soft gripper. (2019-10-11)

Nanoscale manipulation of light leads to exciting new advancement
Scientists in the Theoretical Nanophotonics Group at The University of New Mexico's Department of Physics and Astronomy have made an exciting new advancement to this end, in a pioneering research effort titled 'Analysis of the Limits of the Near-Field Produced by Nanoparticle Arrays,' published recently in the journal, ACS Nano, a top journal in the field of nanotechnology. (2019-10-11)

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