Current Neck Cancer News and Events | Page 2

Current Neck Cancer News and Events, Neck Cancer News Articles.
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Neurologists say there is no medical justification for police use of neck restraints
A number of Americans have died during encounters with police officers who used chokeholds and other forms of neck restraint. Neurologist argue that some police departments justify use of these tactics with misleading language and that the use of neck restraints has no medical justification. (2020-12-28)

Cost-effective hood reduces aerosol exposures to patients, otolaryngologists
The COVID-19 pandemic has continued to cause dramatic shifts in the practice of otolaryngology. In an effort to mitigate exposure to these airborne particles, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) designed and tested a prototype nasolaryngoscopy hood, worn by the patient that offers safe and effective protection in reducing aerosols exposures. (2020-12-23)

Study reveals low risk of COVID-19 infection among patients undergoing head and neck cancer surgery
A recent international observational study provides important data on the safety of head and neck cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. (2020-12-21)

The Achilles' heel of cancer stem cells
Colon cancer stem cells have one weak spot: the enzyme Mll1. An MDC team led by Walter Birchmeier has now shown in Nature Communications that blocking this protein prevents the development of new tumors in the body. (2020-12-21)

Loss of anti-tumor protein may cause resistance to certain cancer therapies
The absence of a protein that works to prevent tumor formation may explain why some patients are resistant to a common cancer therapy, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They said that testing cancers for the presence of this protein may help clinicians identify patients who may be resistant to or relapse when treated with the therapy. (2020-12-21)

Oral contraceptive pills protect against ovarian and endometrial cancer
A comprehensive study from Uppsala University, involving more than 250,000 women, shows that oral contraceptive use protects against ovarian and endometrial cancer. The protective effect remains for several decades after discontinuing the use. The study is published in the journal Cancer Research. (2020-12-17)

Neuroendovascular procedures linked to patient back pain
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care performed a prospective study of neuroendovascular patients and found more than 40% suffered back pain during the procedure, signaling a need for clinicians to be more proactive in addressing this complaint. (2020-12-17)

Cancer: Tumor driver promoting EMT, metastasis and resistance to therapy
Publication in Nature: researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) identify, for the first time, the functions of FAT1, one of the most frequently mutated cancer gene drivers. They uncover that FAT1 mutations promotes invasive features, metastasis and resistance to commonly used anti-cancer drugs, and discover new therapy for FAT1 mutated cancers. (2020-12-16)

Study finds paediatric cancer patients at no greater risk of severe COVID-19 infection
Children with cancer who test positive for COVID-19 do not appear to be at an increased risk of severe COVID-19 infection compared to healthy children, according a new UK study. (2020-12-14)

Nearly 72% of Black patients with gynecologic cancer and COVID-19 were hospitalized for the virus compared with 46 percent of non-Blacks
COVID-19 deaths among Black patients with gynecologic cancer disproportionately higher compared to non-Black patients. (2020-12-09)

Exercise may protect bone health after weight loss surgery
Although weight loss surgery is a highly effective treatment for obesity, it can be detrimental to bone health. A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research suggests that exercise may help address this shortcoming. (2020-12-09)

Researchers create framework to help determine timing of cancer mutations
UCLA researchers studying cancer evolution have created a framework to help determine which tool combinations are best for pinpointing the exact timing of DNA mutations in cancer genomes. (2020-12-07)

Huntsman Cancer Institute researchers identify promising drug combination for melanoma
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have identified a potential drug combination to treat uveal melanoma, a type of eye cancer. Lead author Amanda Truong, trainee in the McMahon Lab at HCI and student at the U of U, explains uveal melanoma patients frequently have changes in genes called GNAQ and GNA11, which are key targets for these drugs. This study was published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research. (2020-12-03)

Study: Telemedicine use disparity during COVID-19 among head and neck cancer patients
Retrospective research by Henry Ford otolaryngologists found telemedicine use disparity among head and neck cancer patients. (2020-12-02)

AI predicts which drug combinations kill cancer cells
A machine learning model developed in Finland can help us treat cancer more effectively. (2020-12-01)

City of Hope developed cancer-killing virus: activates immune system against colon cancer
A cancer-killing virus that City of Hope scientists developed could one day improve the immune system's ability to eradicate tumors in colon cancer patients, reports a new study in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. The preclinical research is a first step to showing that City of Hope's oncolytic virus CF33 can target hard-to-treat tumors that 'handcuff' the immune system and keep T cells from activating the immune system to kill cancer cells. (2020-12-01)

Oncotarget launches special collection on breast cancer
Breast Cancer Collection published in honor of breast cancer awareness. (2020-12-01)

Researchers study influence of cultural factors on gesture design
Freehand gesture-based interfaces in interactive systems are becoming more common, but what if your preferred way to gesture a command - say, changing the TV to channel 10 - significantly differed from that of a user from another culture? Would the system recognize your command? Researchers from the Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology and their collaborators explored this question and found that some gesture choices are significantly influenced by the cultural backgrounds of participants. (2020-12-01)

Channeling the immune system for head and neck cancer
University of Cincinnati researchers have discovered new clues into why some people with head and neck cancer respond to immunotherapy, while others don't. (2020-11-24)

Medicaid expansion may result in earlier diagnosis of colon cancer
The Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion for low-income people appears to lead to earlier diagnosis of colon cancer, enhanced access to care, and improved surgical care for patients with this common cancer. (2020-11-23)

Scientists discover roles for a cellular motor in cancer
Utah scientists have discovered new functions of a key cellular machine that regulates gene packaging and is mutated in 20% of human cancers. The study was published in print today in the journal Molecular Cell. (2020-11-19)

Existing antidepressant helps to inhibit growth of cancer cells in lab animals
New research has shown that the antidepressant sertraline helps to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. The substance acts on a metabolic addiction that allows different types of cancer to grow. This is shown by a study on cell cultures and lab animals by researchers at KU Leuven. (2020-11-17)

State-level lung cancer screening rates not aligned with lung cancer burden in the US
A new study reports that state-level lung cancer screening rates were not aligned with lung cancer burden. (2020-11-12)

MD Anderson researchers present immunotherapy advances at Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer Annual Meeting
Promising clinical results with combination treatments for patients with melanoma and lung cancer highlight immunotherapy advances being presented by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center at The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) 35th Anniversary Annual Meeting & Pre-Conference Programs (SITC 2020) . (2020-11-11)

Personalized cancer vaccine clinical trial to expand following promising early results
A University of Arizona Health Sciences clinical trial to study safety and effectiveness of a personalized cancer vaccine combined with immunotherapy drug Pembrolizumab will expand after promising preliminary data was presented at the Society for the Immunotherapy of Cancer's annual meeting. Researcher Julie E. Bauman, MD, MPH, reported data on the first 10 patients with head and neck cancer, seven of whom were treated at Banner - University Medicine, clinical partner for the UArizona Cancer Center. (2020-11-10)

New analysis finds lung cancer screening reduces rates of lung cancer-specific death
Low-dose CT screening methods may prevent one death per 250 at-risk adults screened, according to a meta-analysis of eight randomized controlled clinical trials of lung cancer screening. Researchers at the University of Georgia analyzed the health outcomes of 90,275 patients, comparing those who were screened versus those who received usual medical care or chest x-rays. (2020-11-10)

Baby dinosaurs were 'little adults'
Paleontologists at the University of Bonn (Germany) have described for the first time an almost complete skeleton of a juvenile Plateosaurus and discovered that it looked very similar to its parents even at a young age. That could have important implications for how the young animals lived and moved around. The young Plateosaurus, nicknamed ''Fabian'', was discovered in 2015 at the Frick fossil site in Switzerland. (2020-11-06)

Every month delayed in cancer treatment can raise risk of death by around 10%
People whose treatment for cancer is delayed by even one month have in many cases a 6 to 13% higher risk of dying - a risk that keeps rising the longer their treatment does not begin - suggests research published online in The BMJ. (2020-11-04)

Vitamin B3 protects skin cells from the effects of UV exposure, new research finds
Research presented today at EADV's 29th Congress, EADV Virtual, shows hope that a form of vitamin B3 could protect skin cells from the effects of ultraviolet (UV) exposure: the main risk factor for non-melanoma skin cancers. (2020-10-31)

Achieving high concentrations of sunitinib in tumors is linked to improved survival
A strategy for giving intermittent, high doses of the anti-cancer drug sunitinib is well-tolerated by patients with advanced cancer and increases concentrations of the drug in tumors, which is associated with improved survival, according to research to be presented at the 32nd EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, which is taking place online. (2020-10-23)

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications. (2020-10-22)

Cholesterol medications linked to lower cancer-related deaths in women
Among women with breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or melanoma, those who were taking cholesterol-lowering medications, were less likely to die from cancer, according to an analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-10-21)

Rutgers finds new way to personalize treatments for prostate cancer
Rutgers researchers have discovered human gene markers that work together to cause metastatic prostate cancer - cancer that spreads beyond the prostate. (2020-10-19)

Novel mechanical mechanism of metastatic cancer cells in substrates of different stiffness revealed
Metastasis, the spread of cancer cells to a different body part from where it started, is considered as the most dangerous phase of cancer development. When cancer cells break away from the main tumor and enter the bloodstream or lymphatic system, they can travel to anywhere of the body, proliferate and creating a secondary tumor in a new location. It is often said that metastasis is responsible for around 90% of cancer deaths. (2020-10-16)

A new approach to analyzing the morphology of dendritic spines
Dendritic spines are small protrusions from a neuron's dendrite membrane, where contact with neighboring axons is formed to receive synaptic input. Changes in the characteristics of the dendritic spines are associated with learning and memory and could be a feature of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Scientists examined a novel approach to analyzing the dendritic spine shapes. (2020-10-12)

Head and neck injuries make up nearly 28% of all electric scooter accident injuries
A Henry Ford study is sounding the alarm on the rise of electric scooter injuries, and particularly head and neck injuries, since the 2017 introduction of e-scooter rideshare programs in urban centers. (2020-10-12)

Oncotarget: Rapid onset type 1 diabetes with anti-PD-1 directed therapy
Volume 11, Issue 28 of Oncotarget features 'Rapid onset type 1 diabetes with anti-PD-1 directed therapy', by Yun et al. and reported that Type 1 diabetes is a rare immune-related adverse event caused by checkpoint inhibitors with serious risk for diabetic ketoacidosis. (2020-10-09)

Advanced prostate cancer has an unexpected weakness that can be targeted by drugs
Kanazawa University researchers reported that the SUCLA2 gene is frequently involved in the deletion of the tumor suppressor gene RB1 in advanced prostate cancer. RB1 deletion makes cells resistant to hormone therapy but SUCLA2 deletion induces a metabolic weakness. The study showed that thymoquinone selectively killed SUCLA2-deficient prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The findings highlight a vulnerability of advanced prostate cancer cells that can be targeted by drugs. (2020-10-07)

Oral cancer pain predicts likelihood of cancer spreading
Oral cancer is more likely to spread in patients experiencing high levels of pain, according to a team of researchers at NYU College of Dentistry that found genetic and cellular clues as to why metastatic oral cancers are so painful. (2020-10-07)

Promising breath-test for cancer
The global quest to use a person's breath analysis for rapid, inexpensive and accurate early-stage testing for cancer and other diseases has taken a leap forward. In a new paper in the British Journal of Cancer, Flinders University researchers have reported significant progress in developing a method to test exhaled breath profiles which accurately differentiate head and neck cancer from non-cancer patients. (2020-10-05)

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