Current Negative Stereotypes News and Events

Current Negative Stereotypes News and Events, Negative Stereotypes News Articles.
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Positive vibes only: Forego negative texts or risk being labelled a downer
A new study from researchers at the University of Ottawa's School of Psychology has found that using negative emojis in text messages produces a negative perception of the sender regardless of their true intent. (2021-02-22)

Depressed and out of work? Therapy may help you find a job
If depression is making it more difficult for some unemployed people to land a job, one type of therapy may help, research suggests. In a new study, 41% of unemployed or underemployed people undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) found a new job or went from part- to full-time work by the end of the 16-week treatment for depression. (2021-02-22)

Rich nations see virus rates fall quicker -- study
Richer countries were more likely to see rates of COVID-19 fall faster during the first wave of the pandemic, according to new research published in the journal Frontiers in Public Health. (2021-02-18)

Oncotarget: AKT isoforms have discrete expression in triple negative breast cancers
Oncotarget recently published ''AKT isoforms have discrete expression in triple negative breast cancers and roles in cisplatin sensitivity'' which reported that the authors investigated the expression and net effect of the individual isoforms in triple negative breast cancers and response to cisplatin treatment using cellular, mice models and clinical samples. (2021-02-15)

Once bitten, twice shy: the neurology of why one bad curry could put us off for life
A negative experience with food usually leaves us unable to stomach the thought of eating that particular dish again. Using sugar-loving snails as models, researchers at the University of Sussex believe these bad experiences could be causing a switch in our brains, which impacts our future eating habits. (2021-02-11)

Study: Reducing biases about autism may increase social inclusion
Psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas hope to improve the social success of autistic adolescents and adults by promoting understanding and acceptance of autism among non-autistic people instead of focusing on teaching them ways to think and behave more like their non-autistic peers. (2021-02-08)

The strange impact of the first consumer review
If you're about to buy something online and its only customer review is negative, you'd probably reconsider the purchase, right? It turns out a product's first review can have an outsized effect on the item's future -- it can even cause the product to fail. (2021-02-04)

Eavesdropping marmosets understood other monkeys' conversations - and they judged
Captive marmosets that listened in on recorded vocal interactions between other monkeys appeared to understand what they overheard - and formed judgements about one of the interlocutors as a result, according to behavioral analyses and thermal measurements that corresponded with the marmosets' emotional states. The findings suggest that the eavesdropping monkeys. (2021-02-03)

People blame a vehicle's automated system more than its driver when accidents happen
A new study in the journal Risk Analysis found that people are more likely to blame a vehicle's automation system and its manufacturer than its human driver when a crash occurs. (2021-02-02)

Explaining to your child why behavior is wrong may not always work
Parents know the scenario all too well: their child misbehaves and it comes time for discipline. (2021-01-29)

Voters perceive political candidates with a disability as qualified for elected office
Political candidates with a disability have historically been underrepresented. A new study has found for the first time that voters do not apply certain stereotypes associated with disability to such candidates. Voters see them as honest, hard-working, and concerned with social welfare issues. The results show that the cause of under-representation may not lay with voters' perceptions, but with a lack of support from governments and political parties. (2021-01-28)

Study: Negative mental health effects of pandemic lockdowns spike, then fade
Social distancing policies correlated with immediate increases in interest in information about 'isolation' and 'worry' - but those effects tapered off two to four weeks after their respective peaks, says new research co-written by Dolores Albarracín, a professor of psychology and of business administration at Illinois, and Bita Fayaz Farkhad (pictured), an economist and a postdoctoral researcher in psychology at Illinois. (2021-01-25)

How clicks on a job platform can reveal bias
Scientists at ETH Zurich have leveraged big data from recruitment platforms and machine learning to study hiring discrimination. They show that discrimination against immigrants depends, among other things, on the time of day; and that both men and women face discrimination. (2021-01-21)

Having plants at home improved psychological well-being during lockdown
This was agreed by 74% of the more than 4,200 respondents in 46 countries. In fact, more than half of them (55.8%) stated that they would have preferred to have more plants in their house during that difficult period. (2021-01-21)

'Aging well' greatly affected by hopes and fears for later life, OSU study finds
If you believe you are capable of becoming the healthy, engaged person you want to be in old age, you are much more likely to experience that outcome, a recent Oregon State University study shows. (2021-01-21)

Sexual harassment claims by less feminine women perceived as less credible
Women who do not fit female stereotypes are less likely to be seen as victims of sexual harassment, and if they claim they were harassed, they are less likely to be believed, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2021-01-14)

UK government must urgently rethink lateral flow test roll out, warn experts
UK government plans to widen the roll out of the Innova lateral flow test without supporting evidence risks serious harm, warn experts in The BMJ today. (2021-01-12)

Disposable helmet retains cough droplets, minimizes transmission to dentists
Dentists and otolaryngologists are at particular risk of infection of COVID-19, since they need direct access to the mouth, nose, and throat of patients. The current solutions are expensive, not highly effective, and not very accessible. In Physics of Fluids, researchers discuss their design of an open-faced helmet that is connected to a medical-grade air filtration pump from the top that creates a reverse flow of air to prevent cough droplets from exiting the helmet. (2021-01-12)

School testing plans risk spreading covid-19 more widely, warn experts
As schools prepare to re-open to all pupils in February, experts warn that UK government plans for mass testing risks spreading covid-19 more widely. (2021-01-12)

Study shows meaningful lockdown activity is more satisfying than busyness
With much of the world practicing varying degrees of social distancing and lockdown, researchers have been investigating the key to happiness in isolation. (2021-01-11)

How to mitigate the impact of a lockdown on mental health
The Covid-19 pandemic is impacting people's mental health. But what helps and hinders people in getting through a lockdown? A new study led by researchers at the University of Basel addressed this question using data from 78 countries across the world. The results hint at the pivots and hinges on which the individual's psyche rests in the pandemic. (2021-01-07)

An analysis of 145 journals suggests peer review itself may not explain gender discrepancies in publication rates
An analysis of 145 scholarly journals found that, among various factors that could contribute to gender bias and lesser representation of women in science, the peer review process itself is unlikely to be the primary cause of publishing inequalities. However, Flaminio Squazzoni and colleagues emphasize that the study does not account for many other factors. (2021-01-06)

Facebook posts help facilitate belief that HPV vaccine is dangerous to health
Social media has a history of being a popular place for sexual health discussions, and the HPV vaccine is one of the most discussed vaccines on the internet. Monique Luisi, an assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, suggests some HPV vaccine-related Facebook posts can help facilitate beliefs that the HPV vaccine is dangerous to one's health. She believes it could inform officials for the ongoing COVID-19 vaccine roll out and distribution. (2021-01-05)

Parents' finances differently affected by having a child diagnosed with cancer
Mothers and fathers of children diagnosed with cancer are affected financially in different ways. While mothers' incomes fall in the short term and then rise, the adverse financial repercussions on fathers occur later. Researchers at Uppsala University have investigated the socioeconomic impact on parents of having a child diagnosed with cancer. The study is published in the International Journal of Cancer. (2021-01-04)

Targeted brain stimulation dulls social pain
Pairing brain stimulation with an emotion management technique blunts negative emotions, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. The combination may improve emotional regulation in people with psychiatric disorders. (2020-12-21)

Novel crystalline oxide may solve the problem of overheating in composite materials
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology recently synthesized a novel material that displays unique thermal expansion properties. The method used by the scientists enables the production of a unique crystalline oxide containing zirconium, sulfur, and phosphorus, that exhibits two distinct mechanisms of negative thermal expansion. This is the first known material to show this property and its application may help avoid damage to composite materials, such as computer chip components, facing unexpected temperature changes. (2020-12-18)

Neurotic people feel worse emotionally during the corona crisis
During the corona crisis, neurotic people experience more negative emotions in their everyday lives, are more unstable emotionally and worry more about their health. These are the results of a study carried out by psychologists from the Universities of Münster and Bielefeld. The study has been published in the ''Journal of Research in Personality''. (2020-12-17)

How does immersive reality affect implicit racial bias?
A University of Barcelona study shows that when the virtual scenario is affectively negative, implicit bias increases, and even the illusion of owning a virtual body is lessened. Researchers argue that negative affect prevents the formation of new positive associations with black, and distress leads to disownership of the virtual body. Results challenge virtual reality as an empathy machine and may have implications in the way virtual reality should be used to reduce implicit biases. (2020-12-17)

Talking like a woman in TED Talks is associated with more popularity
Talking like a woman at online TED Talks is being ''uniquely rewarded'' with more views according to researchers, who say female language style is an ''underappreciated but highly effective tool for social influence''. The researchers wanted to find out which was more predictive of TED Talk impact: a more instrumental and complex male-typical language style or a simpler and more personally engaging female-typical language style. (2020-12-16)

Female language style promotes visibility and influence online
A female-typical language style promotes the popularity of talks in the digital context and turns out to be an underappreciated but highly effective tool for social influence. This was shown by UZH psychologists in an international study in which they analyzed 1,100 TED Talks. (2020-12-16)

Proportionally more male bosses negative toward depression
A higher proportion of male than of female managers have negative attitudes toward depression, a University of Gothenburg study shows. The more senior the managerial positions, the bigger the share of men with negative attitudes; the same, moreover, applies to women in senior managerial jobs. (2020-12-14)

The power of validation in helping people stay positive
Telling a distressed friend or family member something as simple as ''I understand why you feel that way'' can go a long way toward helping loved ones feel better, new research suggests. (2020-12-14)

One-year kidney allograft outcomes do not differ by hepatitis C status of donor
Study published in AJKD shows that kidney allograft outcomes one year post-transplantation in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-negative recipients do not differ by the HCV status of the donor. (2020-12-14)

Negative reviews boost sales
Aleksei Smirnov, Assistant Professor, HSE University Faculty of Economic Sciences, and Egor Starkov, Assistant Professor, University of Copenhagen, have constructed a mathematical model that explains why it is advantageous for sellers not to delete negative reviews of their products. A study detailing this conclusion has been accepted for publication in The American Economic Journal: Microeconomics. (2020-12-11)

Immunotherapy improves responses w/o reducing quality of life in early breast cancer
Adding an immune checkpoint inhibitor to the standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with early-stage breast cancer places no greater burden on patients' ability to perform day-to-day activities than chemotherapy alone, new research by Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center investigators shows. (2020-12-10)

CTC dynamics may predict treatment response/prognosis in metastatic breast cancer patients
Early circulating tumor cell dynamics were associated with overall survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer, according to a meta-analysis presented at the 2020 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2020-12-09)

What makes COVID misinformation so tough to stop on social media
A recent study highlights two of the reasons that misinformation about COVID-19 is so difficult to tackle on social media: most people think they're above average at spotting misinformation; and misinformation often triggers negative emotions that resonate with people. The findings may help communicators share accurate information more effectively. (2020-12-07)

IVF boost: Monash researchers use acoustic waves to select high quality sperm
Monash University researchers have used acoustic waves to develop a new approach to separate high-quality sperm for assisted reproduction. These findings can open windows for infertile couples to have a family of their own using IVF. The procedure can process roughly 140 sperm per second and select more than 60,000 high-quality sperm in under 50 minutes - nearly four times faster than the current gold standard. (2020-12-04)

Young people feel let down by politicians and media stereotypes, says new research
An international study titled: To Lockdown and back: young people's lived experience of the COVID-19 pandemic says young people's perspectives on COVID-19 recovery is being overshadowed by negative 'victim or villain' narratives. (2020-11-30)

Insights in the search for new antibiotics
A collaborative research team from the University of Oklahoma, the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Merck & Co. published an opinion article in the journal, Nature Chemical Biology, that addresses the gap in the discovery of new antibiotics. (2020-11-19)

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