Current Neighborhood News and Events

Current Neighborhood News and Events, Neighborhood News Articles.
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Multi-ethnic neighborhoods in England retain diversity unlike in the U.S.
Multi-ethnic neighborhoods in England retain their diversity and are much more stable than such neighborhoods in the U.S., according to geographers from the U.S. and U.K. The team examined how neighborhood diversity has changed on a national scale from 1991 to 2011 using U.K. Census data. (2021-02-23)

Helping behavior may mitigate academic risk for children from low-income neighborhoods
Children raised in neighborhoods with low socio-economic status are at risk for low academic achievement. A new longitudinal study followed young children from such neighborhoods from birth until age seven to explore whether children's capacity to act kindly or generously towards others (prosocial behavior) - including peers, teachers, and family - is linked to their ability to perform well in school. The study showed that prosocial behavior may mitigate academic risk across early childhood. (2021-02-17)

After COVID-19 hit, federal financial aid applications dropped sharply among first-year students
After the COVID-19 crisis hit last March, federal student aid applications among potential college freshmen in California dropped 14 percent between mid-March and mid-August, relative to prior years. While there were also initial declines in applications among current undergraduates and graduate students, these quickly recovered and ended 8 percent higher relative to prior years. (2021-02-10)

What impact does Airbnb have on local housing prices and rents?
According to new research, the presence of an Airbnb property can actually contribute to an increase in housing prices and rental rates in a local neighborhood. But it depends on where the property is located. (2021-02-02)

New psychological model predicts who panic-buys during times of crisis
Drawing on animal-foraging theory, a new model predicts psychological factors that may lead to panic buying during times of crisis. The model is largely supported by real-world data from the COVID-19 pandemic. Richard Bentall of the University of Sheffield, England, and colleagues presented these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on January 27. (2021-01-28)

Where COVID-19 hit hardest, sudden deaths outside the hospital increased
A new study comparing the incidence of sudden deaths occurring outside the hospital across New York City's highly diverse neighborhoods with the percentage of positive SARS-CoV-19 tests found that increased sudden deaths during the pandemic correlate to the extent of virus infection in a neighborhood. The analysis appears in Heart Rhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, and the Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society, published by Elsevier. (2021-01-18)

New study measures neighborhood inequality and violence based on everyday mobility
A new study looking at the patterns of movement from 400,000 people offers fresh insights into how a neighborhood's economic conditions mixed with the mobility patterns of its residents and visitors relates to the well-being of the neighborhood and can serve as a predictor of violence. The theory argues that a neighborhood's well-being depends not only on its own socioeconomic conditions but on the conditions of the neighborhoods its residents visit and are visited by. (2020-12-17)

Kids gain weight when new convenience stores open nearby
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that changes in the food environment around low-income and high-ethnic/racial minority populations over time impact childhood obesity. Increased availability of small grocery stores selling a selection of healthy items in close proximity to children's homes improves their weight status over time, whereas increased availability of convenience stores selling predominantly unhealthy foods is likely to be detrimental. (2020-12-10)

Assessment of racial/ethnic disparities in hospitalization, mortality in patients with COVID-19 in New York City
COVID-19 outcomes based on race and ethnicity were compared in this observational study of patients in a large health system in New York City, and the association of any disparities with coexisting medical conditions and neighborhood characteristics also was assessed. (2020-12-04)

LSU Health conducts first study on neighborhood deprivation and COVID in Louisiana
A study by researchers at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health, believed to be the first study to investigate the role of neighborhood deprivation on COVID-19 in Louisiana, found that the more a neighborhood is deprived, the higher the risk for cases of COVID-19. They report that people living in the most deprived neighborhoods had an almost 40% higher risk of COVID-19 compared to those residing in the least deprived neighborhoods. (2020-12-04)

Once hospitalized, Black patients with COVID-19 have lower risk of death than white
While multiple research studies show that Black and Hispanic patients are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, a team of investigators at NYU Langone Health has found that once hospitalized, Black patients (after controlling for other serious health conditions and neighborhood income) were less likely to have severe illness, die, or be discharged to hospice compared to White patients. (2020-12-04)

Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing had higher COVID-19 death rates
New research has found that Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing, including limited access to broadband internet and low rates of health insurance, had more COVID-19 deaths in spring 2020. (2020-12-03)

Leaf microbiomes are a neighborhood affair in northern forests
Leaf microbiomes of sugar maple trees vary across the species' range, changing in accordance with the types of trees in the surrounding ''neighborhood.'' (2020-12-03)

Weak police, strong democracy: civic ritual and performative peace in contemporary Taiwan
Looking at a case study of Taiwanese police interacting with a powerful local union, the author explores ''weak policing.'' (2020-12-01)

Forest fires, cars, power plants join list of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease
A new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco has found that among older Americans with cognitive impairment, the greater the air pollution in their neighborhood, the higher the likelihood of amyloid plaques - a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. The study adds to a body of evidence indicating that pollution from cars, factories, power plants and forest fires joins established dementia risk factors like smoking and diabetes. (2020-11-30)

Social needs linked to low health-related quality of life among African American cancer survivors
Social needs--such as food and economic insecurity, poor housing and neighborhood conditions, and lack of access to transportation--were common in a group of African American cancer survivors in Detroit, and they were associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-11-23)

UCF researcher examines benefits of supportive communities for older adults
To find out just how well the aging-in-community strategy is working, a University of Central Florida health management and informatics researcher examined three aging-in-community programs in Florida. Her study, which is among the first to examine some key variables for these programs, was recently published in the journal Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine. (2020-11-17)

Demolishing abandoned houses does not reduce nearby crime, study finds
A study conducted by the University of Kansas compared crime rates near abandoned houses that were demolished and similar properties that were not, finding no reduction in violent or property crime near those torn down. Findings suggest simply demolishing dangerous houses is not enough to reduce crime. (2020-11-10)

Trees set sixth-graders up for success
The transition to middle school is undeniably tough for many sixth-graders, even in the best of times. Mounting academic demands, along with changes in peer dynamics and the onset of puberty, result in a predictable and sometimes irreversible slump in academic performance. A new University of Illinois study suggests an unexpected but potentially potent remedy: trees. (2020-11-09)

Physical distancing polices not enough to protect lower-income people: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health study of the first four months of America's coronavirus epidemic, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, shows that physical distancing (also called ''social distancing'') policies had little effect on lower income people still needing to leave their homes to go to work--but does show them staying home when they could. (2020-11-06)

Asteroid's scars tell stories of its past
Asteroid Bennu, which was just sampled by NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission, only recently migrated into Earth's neighborhood, according to a detailed analysis of impact marks on boulders on its surface. The report provides a new benchmark for understanding the evolution of asteroids and offers insights into space debris hazardous to spacecraft. (2020-10-30)

Molecular compass for cell orientation
Plants have veins that transport nutrients through their body. These veins are highly organized. The hormone auxin travels directionally from cell-to-cell and provides cells with positional information, coordinating them during vein formation and regeneration. Scientists at IST Austria now discovered how cells translate auxin signals into forming a complex system of veins. This phenomenon also applies to wound healing and might lead to more mechanically resistant plants and further agricultural implications. (2020-10-29)

Poverty linked to higher risk of death in children with cancer undergoing transplant
Despite the increasing use and promise of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as curative therapy for children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases, new research suggests that children transplanted for cancer are more likely to die from treatment-related complications if they live in poorer neighborhoods. The study, published today in the journal Blood, also found that having Medicaid versus private insurance, another marker of poverty, was associated with a higher chance of dying. (2020-10-26)

Individual psychological well-being may guard heart health in Black adults
A strong sense of psychological well-being, also called psychosocial resilience, may contribute to better cardiovascular health in Black Americans. In a rare examination of cardiovascular health focused on one racial group - instead of comparing groups - this study explored psychosocial and neighborhood factors that can positively affect cardiovascular health within a Black community. Researchers found that psychosocial resilience may be more important for cardiovascular health in Black adults than where they live, which is recognized as a social determinant of health. (2020-10-07)

6,500-year-old copper workshop uncovered in the Negev Desert's Beer Sheva
A new study indicates that a workshop for smelting copper ore once operated in the Neveh Noy neighborhood of Beer Sheva, the capital of the Negev Desert. The new study also shows that the site may have made the first use in the world of a revolutionary apparatus: the furnace. (2020-10-05)

Your neighborhood may raise your risk of chronic kidney disease
A neighborhood's overall socioeconomic status, including income and education-level, may influence its residents' risk of chronic kidney disease, according to a study recently published in SSM Population Health by researchers from Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-09-23)

County and ZIP code-level data show 'stark social inequities' in COVID-19
A geocoding approach - linking routinely collected public health data to neighborhood socioeconomic factors - shows consistently higher rates of COVID-19 illness and death among people living in more-disadvantaged communities, reports a study in the November/December Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-09-22)

News coverage in Chicago disproportionately devalues Black and Hispanic lives
Social scientists found that homicide victims killed in Chicago's predominantly Black and Hispanic neighborhoods received less news coverage than those killed in mostly white neighborhoods. (2020-09-22)

Massive halo finally explains stream of gas swirling around the Milky Way
Astronomers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and their colleagues have discovered that a halo of warm gas surrounding the Magellanic Clouds likely acts as a protective cocoon, shielding the dwarf galaxies from the Milky Way's own halo and contributing most of the Magellanic Stream's mass. (2020-09-09)

Intelligent software for district renewable energy management
CSEM has developed Maestro, an intelligent software application that can manage and schedule the production and use of renewable energies for an entire neighborhood. The system can process a full range of parameters relating to heat pumps, solar panels, rechargeable batteries and electric vehicle charging stations - and generates a real-time strategy to optimize energy costs. Maestro has already been installed in two Swiss homes. (2020-09-04)

The potential of green infrastructure in mitigating flood impacts: Focused on the mobility of low income and minority comunities
This research advances national methods for assessing flood vulnerability and prioritizing transportation improvement investments, to ensure that no community is left stranded when the next flood occurs. (2020-09-03)

Living in disadvantaged neighborhoods doubles post-op delirium risk for older adults
Where you live can increase your risk for experiencing delirium after surgery. So said a study that showed older adults who live in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods are two times more likely to experience delirium after surgery than their counterparts from more affluent communities. (2020-08-31)

Historical redlining linked to premature births, lower birth weight babies
Adverse birth outcomes -- including premature births, low birth weight babies and babies who are small for their gestational age -- are more likely to occur in neighborhoods that were once redlined, finds a new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers. The results indicate that past discriminatory housing practices may be partly to blame for the disparities in infant and maternal health faced by people of color in the US. (2020-08-14)

Review: Consequences of systemic racism in urban environments
Even as studies have shown that the uneven distribution of urban heat islands, urban tree canopy cover, and urban environmental hazards, for example, are strongly dictated by structural racism and classism in cities, relatively few studies have addressed the varied contributions of social factors like race to ecological heterogeneity in cities. (2020-08-13)

Disparities in a common air pollutant are visible from space
As a global center for petrochemical manufacturing, Houston, Texas, experiences some of the worst air quality in the country, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Evidence suggests that air pollution disproportionately affects low-income, non-white and Hispanic residents, but it's difficult to directly observe differences in pollutants between neighborhoods. Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology have used airplanes and a satellite to uncover disparities in nitrogen dioxide amounts in the atmosphere above Houston. (2020-08-05)

Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance
New research out of Iowa State University suggests that demolishing abandoned houses may lead nearby property owners to better maintain their homes. (2020-08-03)

Community-level disparities in COVID-19 infections, deaths in large US metro areas
The association of neighborhood race/ethnicity and poverty with COVID-19 infections and related deaths in urban U.S. counties are examined in this observational study. (2020-07-28)

New study finds racial disparities in COVID-19-related deaths exist beyond income differences in 10
New analyses by a team of researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine examine the interplay between race/ethnicity and income on COVID-19 cases and related deaths in 10 major US cities. (2020-07-28)

How a few negative online reviews early on can hurt a restaurant
Just a few negative online restaurant reviews can determine early on how many reviews a restaurant receives long-term, a new study has found. The study, published online earlier this month in the journal Papers in Applied Geography, also found that a neighborhood's median household income affected whether restaurants were rated at all. (2020-07-22)

Housing conditions affect cardiovascular health risks
Lack of stable housing or inadequate housing is related to high blood pressure, obesity and other risk factors for cardiovascular events such as heart attacks, strokes, heart failure and others. Racial and ethnic segregation and gentrification affect heart health by limiting access to affordable, high-quality housing in under-resourced communities. (2020-07-15)

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