Current Neighborhoods News and Events

Current Neighborhoods News and Events, Neighborhoods News Articles.
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Multi-ethnic neighborhoods in England retain diversity unlike in the U.S.
Multi-ethnic neighborhoods in England retain their diversity and are much more stable than such neighborhoods in the U.S., according to geographers from the U.S. and U.K. The team examined how neighborhood diversity has changed on a national scale from 1991 to 2011 using U.K. Census data. (2021-02-23)

Poor swelter as urban areas of U.S. Southwest get hotter
As climate change accelerates, low-income districts in the Southwestern United States are 4 to 7 degrees hotter in Fahrenheit -- on average -- than wealthy neighborhoods in the same metro regions. (2021-02-18)

Helping behavior may mitigate academic risk for children from low-income neighborhoods
Children raised in neighborhoods with low socio-economic status are at risk for low academic achievement. A new longitudinal study followed young children from such neighborhoods from birth until age seven to explore whether children's capacity to act kindly or generously towards others (prosocial behavior) - including peers, teachers, and family - is linked to their ability to perform well in school. The study showed that prosocial behavior may mitigate academic risk across early childhood. (2021-02-17)

US cities segregated not just by where people live, but where they travel daily
An analysis of 133 million tweets found that city-dwellers stay racially segregated as they eat, drink, shop, socialize and travel each day, demonstrating even deeper segregation than previously understood. (2021-02-11)

After COVID-19 hit, federal financial aid applications dropped sharply among first-year students
After the COVID-19 crisis hit last March, federal student aid applications among potential college freshmen in California dropped 14 percent between mid-March and mid-August, relative to prior years. While there were also initial declines in applications among current undergraduates and graduate students, these quickly recovered and ended 8 percent higher relative to prior years. (2021-02-10)

Study shows when housing quality is poor, children suffer
A new nationally representative study in the Journal of Child Health Care, led by researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital, has found poor-quality housing is independently associated with poorer pediatric health, and suggests ways health care providers and housing programs may address those findings. (2021-01-28)

Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to lack greenspace today
Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to have a paucity of greenspace today compared to other neighborhoods. The study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, demonstrates the lasting effects of redlining, a racist mortgage appraisal practice of the 1930s that established and exacerbated racial residential segregation in the United States. (2021-01-27)

Food insecurity spiked during early months of pandemic
Food insecurity grew by nearly 80 percent in two African American neighborhoods during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, erasing nearly a decade of progress in closing disparities between the communities and the national at large. (2021-01-21)

Ohio State-led support program suggests a reduction in preterm birth and infant mortality
New research suggests a unique program called Moms2B at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows a reduction in adverse pregnancy outcomes in communities disproportionately affected by these public health issues. (2021-01-19)

Where COVID-19 hit hardest, sudden deaths outside the hospital increased
A new study comparing the incidence of sudden deaths occurring outside the hospital across New York City's highly diverse neighborhoods with the percentage of positive SARS-CoV-19 tests found that increased sudden deaths during the pandemic correlate to the extent of virus infection in a neighborhood. The analysis appears in Heart Rhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, and the Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society, published by Elsevier. (2021-01-18)

What if clean air benefits during COVID-19 shutdown continued post-pandemic?
A new study poses a hypothetical question: What if air quality improvements in New York City during the spring COVID-19 shutdown were sustained for five years without the economic and health costs of the pandemic? Cumulative benefits during this period would amount to thousands of avoided cases of illness and death in children and adults, as well as associated economic benefits between $32 to $77 billion. (2020-12-21)

Study identifies amenities parents want in public parks
While parents from diverse backgrounds most often value parks that offer amenities like playgrounds, sports fields and green spaces, they also want parks to feel safe, according to a survey by North Carolina State University researchers. (2020-12-21)

UMD finds more West Nile virus-infected mosquitoes in lower-income areas of Baltimore
Researchers at the University of Maryland found higher rates of West Nile virus-infected mosquitoes in lower-income neighborhoods in urban areas of Baltimore, Maryland. Continuing a collaboration with the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, this preliminary data provides another piece of the puzzle pointing to higher risk of mosquito-transmitted diseases in these neighborhoods already struggling with environmental injustices and poorer health outcomes. (2020-12-17)

New study measures neighborhood inequality and violence based on everyday mobility
A new study looking at the patterns of movement from 400,000 people offers fresh insights into how a neighborhood's economic conditions mixed with the mobility patterns of its residents and visitors relates to the well-being of the neighborhood and can serve as a predictor of violence. The theory argues that a neighborhood's well-being depends not only on its own socioeconomic conditions but on the conditions of the neighborhoods its residents visit and are visited by. (2020-12-17)

Research shows disparities in how communities respond to cardiac arrest
Black neighborhoods had a significantly lower rate of bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use relative to non-Hispanic/Latino white communities, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2020-12-09)

LSU Health conducts first study on neighborhood deprivation and COVID in Louisiana
A study by researchers at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health, believed to be the first study to investigate the role of neighborhood deprivation on COVID-19 in Louisiana, found that the more a neighborhood is deprived, the higher the risk for cases of COVID-19. They report that people living in the most deprived neighborhoods had an almost 40% higher risk of COVID-19 compared to those residing in the least deprived neighborhoods. (2020-12-04)

Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing had higher COVID-19 death rates
New research has found that Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing, including limited access to broadband internet and low rates of health insurance, had more COVID-19 deaths in spring 2020. (2020-12-03)

Long-term data shows racial & ethnic disparities in effectiveness of anti-smoking measures
Tobacco control efforts have reduced cigarette smoking for many, but those efforts have disproportionately helped white smokers, while other racial and ethnic groups are still struggling, an Oregon State University researcher's analysis found. (2020-12-01)

Study: Jumps in elementary school violence linked to increased student transfers
New research finds that student exposure to violent crime in urban elementary schools is linked to higher transfer rates, with students ineligible for free- or reduced-price meals and students from safer neighborhoods more likely to leave than their less advantaged peers. The study was published today in the American Educational Research Journal, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2020-11-17)

Losing the American Dream
As many Americans struggle to pay their bills, keeping up with mortgage payments can be daunting with the risk of losing one's home. The challenges to retain a home are stratified along racial differences. Black homeowners are twice as likely to lose their homes and transition back to renting than white homeowners, according to a recent Dartmouth-led study published in Demography. African American owners exit their homes at a rate of 10 percent compared with whites' exit rate of five percent. (2020-11-11)

Demolishing abandoned houses does not reduce nearby crime, study finds
A study conducted by the University of Kansas compared crime rates near abandoned houses that were demolished and similar properties that were not, finding no reduction in violent or property crime near those torn down. Findings suggest simply demolishing dangerous houses is not enough to reduce crime. (2020-11-10)

Young survivors of acute myeloid leukemia have long-term complications from treatment
Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have a high risk of developing several long-term health complications after treatment, a study led by UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers has found. The most common complications were cardiovascular, endocrine and respiratory diseases. The complications - known as late effects - were more present among non-white AYA patients and those living in more deprived neighborhoods. (2020-11-09)

Physical distancing polices not enough to protect lower-income people: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health study of the first four months of America's coronavirus epidemic, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, shows that physical distancing (also called ''social distancing'') policies had little effect on lower income people still needing to leave their homes to go to work--but does show them staying home when they could. (2020-11-06)

Four major predictors of COVID-19 emerge in Texas A&M study
In March 2020, New York City, an icon of America, was unfortunately named an early epicenter of the novel coronavirus. Now seven months later, America faces a new surge in coronavirus cases and researchers at Texas A&M University hope to provide information and context to help with the battle ahead. (2020-11-04)

Models show how COVID-19 cuts a neighborhood path
A research team led by UC Irvine and the University of Washington has created a new model of how the coronavirus can spread through a community. The model factors in network exposure -- whom one interacts with -- and demographics to simulate at a more detailed level both where and how quickly the coronavirus could spread through Seattle and 18 other major cities. (2020-10-29)

Localized vaccination surveillance could help prevent measles outbreaks
Access to more localized data on childhood vaccination coverage, such as at the school or neighborhood levels, could help better predict and prevent measles outbreaks in the United States, according to a new University of Michigan study. (2020-10-26)

The GovLab launches collective intelligence to solve public problems
A new report from The Governance Lab at NYU's Tandon School of Engineering examines global examples of how public institutions are using new technology to take advantage of the collective action and collective wisdom of people in their communities and around the world to address problems like climate change, loneliness and natural disaster response (2020-10-20)

Trees and lawns beat the heat
As climate change pushes many cities towards dangerous temperatures, planners are scrambling to mitigate excessive heat. One strategy is to replace artificial surfaces with vegetation cover. In water-limited regions, municipalities have to balance the benefit of cooler temperatures with using precious water for irrigation. A new University of Utah study will make those decisions easier for the semi-arid Salt Lake Valley, the largest metropolitan area in Utah located in the northern part of the state. (2020-10-13)

Poor families must move often, but rarely escape concentrated poverty
Repeated unforeseen circumstances force low-income families to quickly move from one home to the next in a process that helps to perpetuate racial and economic segregation in the United States. Research offers possible policy fixes for helping families with housing vouchers move to high opportunity areas. (2020-10-08)

Cannabis ads and store location influence youth marijuana use
States may want to consider the proximity of cannabis retailers and cannabis advertising to neighborhoods to prevent underage use of the drug, according to new WSU research. (2020-10-08)

Effects of poverty on childhood development seen in children as young as 5
UCLA researchers have found that health inequities can be measured in children as young as 5 years old. The research, published in Health Affairs, contributes to a growing body of literature finding that children of color who are also poor face greater health inequities than their white counterparts. (2020-10-08)

Individual psychological well-being may guard heart health in Black adults
A strong sense of psychological well-being, also called psychosocial resilience, may contribute to better cardiovascular health in Black Americans. In a rare examination of cardiovascular health focused on one racial group - instead of comparing groups - this study explored psychosocial and neighborhood factors that can positively affect cardiovascular health within a Black community. Researchers found that psychosocial resilience may be more important for cardiovascular health in Black adults than where they live, which is recognized as a social determinant of health. (2020-10-07)

More than 90% of driver's license suspensions are not related to traffic safety
A study conducted found that the vast majority of license suspensions are for non-driving-related events, such as failure to pay a fine or appear in court, and that these suspensions disproportionately affect those living in low-income communities and in communities with a greater percentage of Black and Hispanic residents. (2020-09-29)

US hospital admissions for non-COVID-19 have only partially rebounded from initial decline
While declines in U.S. hospital admissions during the onset of COVID-19 has been well-documented, little is known about how admissions during the rebound varied by age, insurance coverage and socioeconomic groups. The decline in non-COVID-19 admissions was similar across all demographic subgroups but the partial rebound that followed shows that non-COVID-19 admissions for residents from Hispanic neighborhoods was significantly lower than for other groups. The findings are reported in a new study in Health Affairs. (2020-09-25)

The Lancet: First nationally representative estimate of COVID-19 seroprevalence in the U.S. suggests few in the population developed antibodies in the first wave
The first cross-sectional, nation-wide analysis of more than 28,000 patients on dialysis in the U.S. found that fewer than 10% of U.S. adults had COVID-19 antibodies as of July 2020 and fewer than 10% were diagnosed. (2020-09-25)

Your neighborhood may raise your risk of chronic kidney disease
A neighborhood's overall socioeconomic status, including income and education-level, may influence its residents' risk of chronic kidney disease, according to a study recently published in SSM Population Health by researchers from Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-09-23)

News coverage in Chicago disproportionately devalues Black and Hispanic lives
Social scientists found that homicide victims killed in Chicago's predominantly Black and Hispanic neighborhoods received less news coverage than those killed in mostly white neighborhoods. (2020-09-22)

The potential of green infrastructure in mitigating flood impacts: Focused on the mobility of low income and minority comunities
This research advances national methods for assessing flood vulnerability and prioritizing transportation improvement investments, to ensure that no community is left stranded when the next flood occurs. (2020-09-03)

Vaccine narrows racial disparities in pneumococcal disease
In a major public health success, the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine PCV13, or Prevnar 13, in 2010 in the United States is associated with reduction in socioeconomic disparities and the near elimination of Black-white-based racial disparities for invasive pneumococcal disease. (2020-08-31)

Study finds younger and older drivers more likely to drive older, less safe vehicles
A new study found that teen drivers and drivers 65 years and older - two age groups at a higher risk of being involved in an automobile accident - are more likely to be driving vehicles that are less safe, putting them at even higher risk of injury. The findings underscore the need for these groups to prioritize driving the safest vehicle they can afford. (2020-08-27)

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