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Current Neighborhoods News and Events, Neighborhoods News Articles.
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Life expectancy gap between Black and white people in Washington, DC, analyzed
Heart disease, homicide and cancer are leading contributing factors to stark differences in life expectancy between Black people and white people in Washington, DC, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-08-27)

Terms in Seattle-area rental ads reinforce neighborhood segregation
A new University of Washington study of Seattle-area rental ads shows how certain words and phrases are common to different neighborhoods, helping to reinforce residential segregation. (2020-08-26)

Historical redlining linked to premature births, lower birth weight babies
Adverse birth outcomes -- including premature births, low birth weight babies and babies who are small for their gestational age -- are more likely to occur in neighborhoods that were once redlined, finds a new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers. The results indicate that past discriminatory housing practices may be partly to blame for the disparities in infant and maternal health faced by people of color in the US. (2020-08-14)

Review: Consequences of systemic racism in urban environments
Even as studies have shown that the uneven distribution of urban heat islands, urban tree canopy cover, and urban environmental hazards, for example, are strongly dictated by structural racism and classism in cities, relatively few studies have addressed the varied contributions of social factors like race to ecological heterogeneity in cities. (2020-08-13)

Systemic racism has consequences for all life in cities
Social inequalities, specifically racism and classism, are impacting the biodiversity, evolutionary shifts and ecological health of plants and animals in our cities. That's the main finding of a review paper published Aug. 13 in Science led by the University of Washington, with co-authors at the University of California, Berkeley, and University of Michigan. (2020-08-13)

Childhood connection to nature has many benefits but is not universally positive, finds review
A literature review by Dr Louise Chawla, Professor Emerita at the University of Colorado, finds that children are happier and more likely to protect the natural world when they have a greater connection to it, but this connection is complex and can also generate negative emotions linked to issues like climate change. (2020-08-06)

Disparities in a common air pollutant are visible from space
As a global center for petrochemical manufacturing, Houston, Texas, experiences some of the worst air quality in the country, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Evidence suggests that air pollution disproportionately affects low-income, non-white and Hispanic residents, but it's difficult to directly observe differences in pollutants between neighborhoods. Now, researchers reporting in Environmental Science & Technology have used airplanes and a satellite to uncover disparities in nitrogen dioxide amounts in the atmosphere above Houston. (2020-08-05)

Warming climate may trigger more West Nile outbreaks in Southern California
A new study of captured mosquitoes in Los Angeles finds that West Nile infection is strongly associated with average temperature, and that temperatures above 73 degrees Fahrenheit are highly favorable for West Nile transmission. As climate change brings hotter weather to the region, it is likely that cooler, coastal neighborhoods will be pushed into the 'favorable' zone, accelerating transmission of the virus. (2020-08-05)

Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance
New research out of Iowa State University suggests that demolishing abandoned houses may lead nearby property owners to better maintain their homes. (2020-08-03)

Despite decline, distribution of air pollution highlights socioeconomic disparities
While the level of fine particulate air pollution has declined considerably over the last several decades, a new study finds that its distribution has remained largely unchanged. (2020-07-30)

Social distancing varies by income in US
Wealthier communities went from being the most mobile before the COVID-19 pandemic to the least mobile, while poorer areas have gone from the least mobile to the most mobile, according to a UC Davis study. (2020-07-29)

New study finds racial disparities in COVID-19-related deaths exist beyond income differences in 10
New analyses by a team of researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine examine the interplay between race/ethnicity and income on COVID-19 cases and related deaths in 10 major US cities. (2020-07-28)

Homes of wealthy Americans have carbon footprints 25% higher than lower-income residences
The homes of wealthy Americans generate about 25% more greenhouse gases than residences in lower-income neighborhoods, mainly due to their larger size. In the nation's most affluent suburbs, those emissions can be as much as 15 times higher than in nearby lower-income neighborhoods. (2020-07-20)

Context matters: Neighborhood factors associated with heavier drinking
People in wealthier neighborhoods drink alcohol twice as frequently as people in poorer areas, suggests a new study from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. (2020-07-12)

Study finds decreased rates of high-cost care after a community development initiative
More than a decade into the community development initiative called Healthy Neighborhoods Healthy Families, the 30-block Southern Orchards neighborhood on Columbus, Ohio's South Side had clear, notable improvement. Home vacancy fell from 30% to under 6%. High school graduation rates increased. More than $40 million in investments were generated in the area. (2020-07-08)

BU study: Nearly half of US youth have been stalked/harassed by partners
A new, first-of-its-kind Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that 48% of 12-18-year-olds who have been in a relationship have been stalked or harassed by a partner, and 42% have stalked or harassed a partner. (2020-06-29)

It's a beautiful day in the neighborhood... or is it?
Contrary to what many would think, characteristics of your neighborhood have little to do with how satisfied you are with it. (2020-06-29)

Income, race are associated with disparities in access to green spaces
Access to green spaces in metro areas--parks, trails, even the tree cover in a neighborhood - is largely associated with income and race, new research indicates. Researchers combined census-block-group demographic and socio-economic data with satellite imagery to analyze access to green spaces and vegetation in two metropolitan areas: Columbus, Ohio, and Atlanta, Georgia. Their study appears in the August issue of the journal Landscape and Urban Planning. (2020-06-23)

Crowded homes, poor neighborhoods linked to COVID-19
A study of nearly 400 pregnant women is among the first to show that socioeconomic status and household crowding increase the risk of getting COVID-19. (2020-06-18)

Centenarian study suggests living environment may be key to longevity
Where you live has a significant impact on the likelihood that you will reach centenarian age, suggests a new study conducted by scientists at Washington State University's Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. Published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health and based on Washington State mortality data, the research team's findings suggest that Washingtonians who live in highly walkable, mixed-age communities may be more likely to live to their 100th birthday. (2020-06-17)

Better reading proficiency linked to fewer youth homicides
A good education system has long been linked with providing opportunity for people to get better jobs and escape poverty. However, less is known about the impact of education on youth violence. (2020-06-11)

Place doesn't trump race as predictor of incarceration
Steven Alvarado is the author of 'The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,' published June 1 in the journal Socius showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn't diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos. (2020-06-11)

New evidence on bed bug burden in urban neighborhoods
In the first study to use systematically collected data from multifamily housing inspections to track bed bug infestation, investigators including Christopher Sutherland at UMass Amherst 'confirm what has long been suspected for bed bugs, but also for public health issues in general' -- infestations are strongly associated with socioeconomic factors, including neighborhood income, eviction rates and crowding. (2020-06-02)

First cases of COVID-19 in New York City primarily from European and US sources
In New York City, the first confirmed COVID-19 cases arose mostly through untracked transmission of the virus from Europe and other parts of the United States, a new molecular epidemiology study of 84 patients reports. (2020-05-29)

Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing in some cities
New research provides insight into how housing prices and neighborhood values have become polarized in some urban areas, with the rich getting richer and the poor becoming poorer. The results of the study, done in Columbus, Ohio, suggest that some of the factors long thought to impact neighborhood values - such as the distance to downtown, nearby highways, or attractions such as city parks - no longer matter much to changing housing prices in an area. (2020-05-28)

Obesity not related to how close you live to fast food or gyms
A new study from Lund University in Sweden has shown no correlation between obesity and how close you live to fast food restaurants or gyms. Studies from other countries have previously indicated that these factors may be important in adult obesity. (2020-05-20)

Segregation and local funding gaps drive disparities in drinking water
The fragmentation of water service in the US among thousands of community systems, most of which are small and rely on local funding, leaves many households vulnerable to water contamination or loss of service as droughts become more frequent, a Duke University analysis finds. Households in low-income or predominantly minority neighborhoods face the highest risks. Making sure their taps don't run dry will require a fundamental re-evaluation of how water systems are managed and funded. (2020-04-20)

Public policies that target crime reduction around parks can directly benefit communities
Public parks can be valuable assets for communities, but crime in the area can 'lock up' that amenity value. Crime directly affects the use that people get from their local parks. If crime is reduced, the environmental value can be unlocked, a new University of Illinois study shows. (2020-04-14)

Housing insecurity may increase risk of kidney disease
In a study of urban-dwelling individuals, housing insecurity was linked with a higher risk of developing albuminuria, a sign of kidney disease. (2020-03-31)

3D genetic structure in blood cancer important beyond DNA code changes
Children with aggressive blood cancers have differences -- not just in the DNA code of their blood cells -- but also in the heavily twisted protein superstructure that controls access to genes. (2020-03-23)

Fewer liquor stores may lead to less homicide
Reducing the number of businesses in Baltimore that sell alcohol in urban residential areas may lower the homicide rate, according to new research. As cities contemplate new zoning regulations regarding alcohol, the implications of those policies can have life-or-death outcomes. (2020-02-13)

Consider workplace AI's impact before it's too late, study says
The paper, ''Beyond Design and Use: How Scholars Should Study Intelligent Design Technologies,'' states that scholars and policymakers need to start thinking about it far more broadly if they want to have a say in what the future looks like. (2020-02-13)

Gun owners aren't happier, don't sleep better at night
New research challenges claims by special interest groups and popular culture about the personal benefits of gun ownership. University of Arizona sociologist Terrence Hill found that gun owners and non-gun owners report about the same levels of happiness and sleep disturbance. (2020-02-04)

Racial discrimination in mortgage market persistent over last four decades
A new Northwestern University analysis finds that racial disparities in the mortgage market suggest that discrimination in loan denial and cost has not declined much over the previous 30 to 40 years, yet discrimination in the housing market has decreased during the same time period. (2020-01-23)

Risk of lead exposure linked to decreased brain volume in adolescents
In a study using brain scans from nearly 10 thousand adolescents across the country, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles show that risk of lead exposure is associated with altered brain anatomy and cognitive deficits in children from low income families. (2020-01-13)

Historical housing disparities linked with dangerous climate impacts
Extreme heat kills more people in the United States than any other type of hazardous weather and will likely become even deadlier due to climate change. However, extreme heat does not affect all people equally. A new study by researchers at Portland State University, the Science Museum of Virginia and Virginia Commonwealth University is one of the first to link historical housing policies across the United States to inequitable heat exposure. (2020-01-13)

Ratings system may penalize hospitals serving vulnerable communities
Analysis of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare rating system shows that hospitals serving vulnerable communities may be judged on social factors outside of their control. (2020-01-07)

Bystander CPR less likely for people living in Hispanic neighborhoods
People living in predominately Hispanic neighborhoods are less likely to receive CPR from a bystander following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest compared to people living in non-Hispanic neighborhoods, researchers from Penn Medicine and the Duke University of School of Medicine reported in the journal Circulation. This same group also had a lower likelihood of survival. (2020-01-02)

Reducing mouse allergens may improve lung growth in asthmatic children
Lowering exposure to allergens from mice may lead to improved lung growth for children with asthma living in low-income neighborhoods, helping them avoid lung ailments and possibly live longer, according to newly published research in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. (2019-12-19)

New tool reveals DNA structures that influence disease
Disruption of certain DNA structures -- called topologically associating domains, or TADs -- is linked with the development of disease, including some cancers. With its newly created algorithm that quickly locates and helps elucidate the complex functions of TADs, an international team of researchers is making it easier to study these important structures and help prevent disease. (2019-12-17)

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