Current Nematodes News and Events

Current Nematodes News and Events, Nematodes News Articles.
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Healthy lifespan analysis using nematodes
Researchers have developed an automated measurement system to assess healthy lifespan using nematodes. This system performs a mini-population analysis to classify specific populations of nematodes based on qualitative differences in lifespan. Since there are many similarities between the mechanisms that determine the lifespan of nematodes and humans, this system could make it easier to develop drugs and find foods that extend the healthy lifespan of humans. (2021-01-27)

New heat method kills pathogens with minimal damage to plants
Turechek and colleagues set out to develop a new heat-based treatment that would kill pathogens without hurting the plant. When asked what most excited them about their research and their new method, Turechek responded, 'That it works! By introducing a lower-temperature conditioning step and using steam rather than hot water, we produced plants that were better able to withstand the higher temperature treatment designed to destroy the pathogen.' (2021-01-19)

A trap for nematodes
Filariae, sometimes up to 70 centimeters long nematodes, can set up residence in their host quite tenaciously and cause serious infectious diseases in the tropics. Researchers have now investigated a mechanism by which the immune system attacks the filariae. Certain immune cells, the eosinophil granulocytes, release DNA that forms a kind of web around the larvae and traps them. The researchers also identified which protein ''turns on'' the mechanism, known as the Dectin-1 receptor. (2021-01-18)

Scientists uncover new path toward treating a rare but deadly neurologic condition
Molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is a compound that is little known but is essential for life. Children born without the ability to synthesize Moco die young. It has not been possible to create Moco supplements because the compound is so unstable. Studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that by combining, Moco with certain proteins, it becomes stable and can repair deficiency. (2021-01-14)

Selfish elements turn embryos into a battlefield
New toxin-antidote pairs discovered in nematode species - researchers from the Burga lab at IMBA - Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences discover selfish elements that could facilitate populations becoming distinct species. The results are published in the journal Current Biology. (2021-01-07)

New cost-effective technique facilitates study of non-bacterial plant microbiomes
Thanks to a new technique developed by plant pathologists in Connecticut, scientists now have access to an affordable and effective tool to facilitate the study of the entire non-bacterial microbiomes of any plant species. (2020-12-08)

Oil-eating worms provide valuable assistance in soil remediation
Bionanotechnology Lab of Kazan Federal University works on adapting nematodes to consuming oil waste. Co-author, Chief Research Associate Rawil Fakhrullin explains, 'We've improved existing methods of biological remediation of soils. Our lab experiment was successful, and we have a new way of delivering oil-consuming bacteria into the soil.' (2020-11-09)

Fungal species naturally suppresses cyst nematodes responsible for major sugar beet losses
In the current study, the authors showed that similar fungi inhabited sugar beet fields in California, suggesting that a group of naturally occurring fungi, given the right conditions, might be able to dramatically reduce nematode populations in one season. (2020-10-29)

Impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal species on heterodera glycines
University of Illinois and USDA plant pathologists found that several different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species from different families reduced the number of cysts on soybean roots by 59 to 80 percent. They also found that one AMF species reduced counts of SCN by 60 percent and was able to suppress egg hatching by as much as 30 percent. (2020-10-26)

Secondary variant of Photorhabdus luminescens interacts with plant roots
One of the basic approaches in organic farming is to use organisms beneficial to the system to combat pests. The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is one such beneficial organism. Yet, it seems this is not the only ability of Photorhabdus that can be exploited for organic plant cultivation. A German research team has discovered additional properties that could significantly extend its range of uses. (2020-09-24)

Photo catalysts show promise in creating self-cleaning surfaces and disinfecting agents
The team produced and studied new active photocatalysts based on natural aluminosilicate nanotubes with cadmium sulfide quantum dots stabilized on their surface synthesized by self-assembly. (2020-09-02)

'Madsen' wheat as source of disease resistance
Researchers show that 'Madsen,' a commonly used wheat variety, is resistant to more pests and diseases than recently thought, making it a good source of genes for breeding better wheat. (2020-08-13)

Adjusting planter parameters to match field conditions can maximize emergence and yield
Planter performance is a critical component when laying the foundation for a successful crop season. Environmental and soil conditions can significantly impact crop germination and emergence and help or hinder development of an adequate crop stand early in the season. Adjusting specific planter components and settings to match current field conditions can ensure maximized emergence and increase yield in most cases. (2020-07-29)

New detection method turns silicon cameras into mid-infrared detectors
Although mid-infrared (MIR) imaging produces images with chemically selective information, the practical implementation of the technique is hampered by the low pixel count and noise performance of current MIR cameras. Scientists at the University of California, Irvine, have overcome this problem through the process of non-degenerate two-photon absorption (NTA) on a Si-chip. This detection strategy turns mature Si cameras into sensitive MIR detectors, thus enabling rapid MIR imaging with high pixel numbers. (2020-07-21)

Study finds fatty acid that kills cancer cells
Researchers have demonstrated that a fatty acid called dihomogamma-linolenic acid, or DGLA, can induce ferroptosis, an iron-dependent type of cell death, in an animal model and in human cancer cells. The discovery has many implications, including a step toward a potential treatment for cancer. (2020-07-10)

Nematode has potential to reduce cotton yields by 50 percent
The reniform nematode is one of the most commonly found pests of cotton, with the ability to cause severe economic damage. In order to assess exactly how much damage the reniform nematode can cause, plant pathologists at Auburn University conducted a field trial comparing a clean field to a reniform-infested field. (2020-07-06)

Researchers discover algorithms and neural circuit mechanisms of escape responses
Prof. WEN Quan from School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has proposed the algorithms and circuit mechanisms for the robust and flexible motor states of nematodes during escape responses. (2020-06-28)

The balancing act between plant growth and defense
Kumamoto University researchers have pinpointed the mechanism that regulates the balance between plant growth and defense. Excessive accumulation of hormones that protect against pathogen infection significantly hinders plant growth. Researchers found that the DEL1 gene plays a role in balancing growth and defense of plants infected with nematodes. This finding is expected to contribute to the improvement of agricultural crop varieties and the identification of infection mechanisms of various pathogens. (2020-06-16)

Anaerobically disinfect soil to increase phosphorus using diluted ethanol
Anaerobic disinfection of soil is an effective method to kill unwanted bacteria, parasites and weeds without using chemical pesticides. Scientists in Japan were able to show that it also increases the availability of useable phosphorus. (2020-06-15)

Dopamine signaling allows neural circuits to generate coordinated behaviors
As part of the study, the MIT research team invented a new open-source microscopy platform complete with a parts list and online instructions for other labs to build their own. (2020-06-11)

Loggerhead sea turtles host diverse community of miniature organisms
An international team led by Florida State University researchers found that more than double the number of organisms than previously observed live on the shells of these oceanic reptiles, raising important questions about loggerhead sea turtle ecology and conservation. (2020-06-01)

Verticillium wilt fungus killing millions of trees is actually an army of microorganisms
A research project studied the microbiome of olive tree roots and concluded that Verticillium wilt is fueled by a community of microorganisms that team up to attack plants, thus reassessing the way this problem is dealt with (2020-05-04)

Fungus application thwarts major soybean pest, study finds
The soybean cyst nematode sucks the nutrients out of soybean roots, causing more than $1 billion in soybean yield losses in the U.S. each year. A new study finds that one type of fungi can cut the nematodes' reproductive success by more than half. (2020-04-09)

Fungi found in cotton can decrease root knot nematode galling
Gregory Sword and colleagues at Texas A&M University inoculated cotton seeds with a diverse array of fungal isolates and tested the resulting seedlings in greenhouse trials for susceptibility to gall formation by root knot nematodes. A majority (77%) of the fungal treatments reduced galling and these reductions were highly repeatable across independent trials. (2020-04-06)

GPS for chromosomes: Reorganization of the genome during development
The spatial arrangement of genetic material within the cell nucleus plays an important role in the development of an organism. A research team from the University of Basel, in collaboration with scientists from Harvard University, has developed a method to trace the chromosomes in individual cells. Using this method, they have now been able to demonstrate that chromosomes reorganize during embryonic development. The study has recently been published in ''Molecular Cell''. (2020-02-28)

Cracking the code for hookworm infestation
Monash University researchers have uncovered a key way that hookworms evade the immune system - providing new hope in the search for a vaccine. (2020-02-12)

Plants found to speak roundworm's language
Nematodes are tiny, ubiquitous roundworms that infect plant roots, causing more than $100 billion in crop damage worldwide each year. New research has found that plants enter into a 'chemical dialog' with the worms to repel infestations, providing insights into how farmers could fight these pests. (2020-01-10)

New MPMI focus issue seeks to improve management of virus-induced disease in crops
The January focus issue of the Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions journal includes four reviews and several research articles covering a variety of current topics examining the cell biology of virus-plant and virus-vector interactions, including cellular RNA hubs, plasmodesmal functioning, tripartite interactions, mechanisms of host defense suppression, and biotechnological approaches to induce host resistance. (2020-01-08)

Benefits of integrating cover crop with broiler litter in no-till dryland cotton systems
Although most cotton is grown in floodplain soils in the Mississippi Delta region, a large amount of cotton is also grown under no-till systems on upland soils that are vulnerable to erosion and have reduced organic matter. There are much lower levels of cotton residue in these systems, which limits the effectiveness of the no-till approach to improve soil health. (2020-01-06)

Grower citizen science project uses collaboration to improve soil health
The Grower Citizen Science Project is a collaboration between soil scientists and growers in the southern High Plains of Texas. Growers have collected soil samples, measured carbon dioxide fluxes, and shared yield data with scientists. Scientists have installed soil moisture and temperature sensors and analyzed nutrients, soil microbial communities, and other data and then shared their findings with growers. (2020-01-06)

Probiotic yeast may offer an effective treatment for drug-resistant fungal infections
Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) & the Central Food Technological Research Institute in India are studying the effect of probiotic yeast in preventing fungal infections. (2019-12-10)

WSU genetic discovery holds implications for better immunity, longer life
Wrinkles on the skin of a microscopic worm might provide the key to a longer, healthier life for humans. Working with Caenorhabditis elegans, a transparent nematode found in soil, researchers at Washington State University's Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine were the first to find that the nervous system controls the tiny worm's cuticle, a skin-like exterior barrier, in response to bacterial infections. Their study was published in Science Advances on Nov. 20. (2019-11-20)

Implementing no-till and cover crops in Texas cotton systems
Healthy soil leads to productive and sustainable agriculture. Farmers who work with, not against, the soil can improve the resiliency of their land. Because of this, practices such as no-till and cover crops and topics such as regenerative agriculture and soil biology have become increasingly important in the agricultural conversation. (2019-11-18)

How nematodes outsmart the defenses of pests
The western corn rootworm, one of the world's most damaging maize pests, can use plant defense compounds to defend itself against its own natural enemies, so-called entomopathogenic nematodes. However, the nematodes can become immune against these compounds in turn, which enhances their ability to fight the western corn rootworm, as researchers at the University of Bern show. This mechanism may contribute to improving biological pest control. (2019-11-15)

Chitin-binding proteins override host plant's resistance to fungal infection
A recent Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions article studies chitin-binding proteins from a soilborne fungus (Verticillium nonalfalfae) that causes vascular wilt in plants. This fungus binds a particular protein (VnaChtBP) to chitin in order to abolish the host plant's chitin-triggered burst of reactive oxygen species and shield the fungus from being digested by the plant. (2019-11-13)

Research suggests fumigants have very low long-term impact on soil health
It started with curiosity. How does a fumigant, commonly used for nematode management in potato cropping systems, influence soil microbial communities? To explore this question, scientists at Colorado State University and Oregon State University used high-throughput sequencing techniques to investigate changes in soil bacterial and fungal community structure in response to the application of 1,3-Dichloropropene (1,3-D) in Pacific Northwest potato production fields. Their research found that the fumigant had very minor effects. (2019-11-07)

Next-generation sequencing used to identify cotton blue disease in the United States
Cotton blue disease, caused by Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), was first reported in 1949 in the Central African Republic and then not again until 2005, when it was reported from Brazil. In 2017, cotton blue disease was identified in Alabama, marking the first report in the United States. (2019-10-17)

First report of cotton blue disease in the United States
Reported from six counties in coastal Alabama in 2017, cotton blue disease affected approximately 25% of the state's cotton crop and caused a 4% yield loss. The disease was reported again in 2018, affecting 3-100% of cotton fields in Alabama but causing only a 1% yield loss. Symptoms, which include slowed plant growth, loss of chlorophyll, and dwarfing of infected leaves, usually do not appear until last August after full bloom. To date, there are no recommended strategies for management of this disease. (2019-10-17)

New survey confirms muscadine grapes are affected by parasitic nematodes
Muscadines are also known for being hearty grapes, with a tough skin that protects them from many fungal diseases. Bunch grapes are highly susceptible to damage from plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs), which affect their health, quality, production, and maintenance. Now, thanks to a combined effort between scientists at the University of Georgia and North Carolina State University, we know that PPNs also affect muscadines. (2019-10-15)

Meet the 'mold pigs,' a new group of invertebrates from 30 million years ago
Fossils preserved in Dominican amber reveal a new family, genus and species of microinvertebrate from the mid-Tertiary period, a discovery that shows unique lineages of the tiny creatures were living 30 million years ago. (2019-10-08)

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