Current Neurodegeneration News and Events

Current Neurodegeneration News and Events, Neurodegeneration News Articles.
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New studies support blood test for early detection of Alzheimer's disease
In three recent publications in Molecular Psychiatry, Brain and JAMA Neurology researchers from the University of Gothenburg provide convincing evidence that an in-house developed blood test for Alzheimer's disease can detect the disease early and track its course, which has major implications for a potential use in clinical practice and treatment trials. (2021-01-13)

Scientists discover mutations associated with early onset dementia
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin today announced a significant advance in our understanding of an early onset form of dementia that may also progress our understanding of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. Adult onset Leukoencephalopathy with axonal Spheroids and Pigmented glia (ALSP) is an ultra-rare condition that manifests initially with psychiatric and behavioural changes in patients followed by a rapid progression of dementia in the third or fourth decade of life. (2020-12-22)

Researchers identify an action mechanism for a drug against Alzheimer' disease
A study conducted on mice published in the journalGeroscience has identified the action mechanism of a promising compound against Alzheimer's disease, developed by the team of Medical Chemistry and Pharmacology at the University of Barcelona. The new drug belongs to a family of molecules that, when bound to imidazole I2 receptors, these cause a reduction in neuroinflammation and an improvement in cognition and other markers of the progression of this disease, the most prevalent among dementias. (2020-12-09)

Reductive stress in neuroblastoma cells aggregates protein and impairs neurogenesis
Cells require a balance among oxidation-reduction reactions, or redox homeostasis. Loss of that balance to create oxidative stress is often associated with neurodegeneration. Less is known about how loss of that balance at the other end of the spectrum -- reductive stress -- may affect neurons. Now researchers show for the first time that reductive stress promotes protein aggregation in neuroblastoma cells and impairs neurogenesis. (2020-12-08)

Study: Early, late stages of degenerative diseases are distinct
Rice University biochemists have proposed that degenerative diseases as varied as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and muscle atrophy occur in two distinct phases marked by protein signaling changes that could result in patients responding differently to the same treatment. (2020-11-23)

Early signs of Alzheimer's disease in people with Down's syndrome
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied the incidence and regional distribution of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in the brains of people with Down's syndrome. The results can bring new possibilities for earlier diagnosis and preventive treatment of dementia. The study is published in Molecular Neurodegeneration. (2020-11-22)

Taking out the trash is essential for brain health
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have identified a protein called Wipi3 that is essential for cellular waste disposal via the alternative autophagy system. Deletion of Wipi3 in the brains of mice causes growth and motor defects attributed to neuronal accumulation of iron, resulting in neurodegeneration. However, over-expression of another alternative autophagy protein, Dram1, reverses the effects in Wipi3 deficiency, and may represent a novel treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-11-19)

CLCN6 identified as disease gene for a severe form of lysosomal neurodegenerative disease
A mutation in the CLCN6 gene is associated with a novel, particularly severe neurodegenerative disorder. Scientists from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) and the Max Delbrück Center für Molekulare Medizin (MDC), together with an international team of researchers, have now analyzed the effect of a point mutation that was found in three unrelated affected children. (2020-11-19)

Diabetes increases neuritic damage around amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease
New research from the University of Eastern Finland explores the role of diabetes in the cellular and molecular changes underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD). (2020-11-18)

Overly reactivated star-shaped cells explain the unpredictability of Alzheimer's disease
IBS-KIST researchers have demonstrated that the severity of 'reactive astrocytes' is a key indicator for the onset of Alzheimer's disease. (2020-11-16)

Study finds PTSD interacts with klotho gene, may cause premature aging in the brain
Genetics and the environment (including psychiatric stress) may contribute to the pace of cellular aging, causing some individuals to have a biological age that exceeds their chronological age. (2020-10-26)

Researchers discover neuroprotective treatment for chronic traumatic brain injury
TBI survivors are currently treated with extensive physical and cognitive rehabilitation, accompanied by medications that may mitigate symptoms yet do not halt or slow neurodegeneration. Now, researchers have found for the first time that this process can be pharmacologically reversed in an animal model of this chronic health condition, offering an important proof of principle in the field and a potential path to new therapy. (2020-10-19)

New study highlights links between inflammation and Parkinson's disease
An international collaboration involving researchers from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biology (LCSB) at the University of Luxembourg established an association between inflammation and specific genetic mutations in Parkinson's patients. The study, recently published in the scientific journal Brain, highlights two biomarkers that could be used to assess Parkinson's disease state and progression. The results also suggest that targeting the immune system with anti-inflammatory medication holds the potential to influence the disease course, at least in a subset of patients. (2020-10-14)

A new approach to analyzing the morphology of dendritic spines
Dendritic spines are small protrusions from a neuron's dendrite membrane, where contact with neighboring axons is formed to receive synaptic input. Changes in the characteristics of the dendritic spines are associated with learning and memory and could be a feature of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Scientists examined a novel approach to analyzing the dendritic spine shapes. (2020-10-12)

Presented a program capable of detecting neurodegeneration biomarkers through magnetic
This tool is able to identify single-person neurodegeneration before the symptom's appearance, which could significate a more effective and personalized medicine. (2020-10-08)

First 'pathoconnectome' could point toward new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases
Scientists from the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah have achieved another first in the field of connectomics, which studies the synaptic connections between neurons. The lab has produced the first pathoconnectome, showing how eye disease alters retinal circuitry. (2020-09-29)

Insect Armageddon: low doses of the insecticide, Imidacloprid, cause blindness in insects
Joint research provides important evidence on the role of insecticides on the longevity of insect population. (2020-09-28)

A genetic variant that protects against Alzheimer's disease promotes immune cell functions
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland found that the PLCG2-P522R genetic variant, which protects against Alzheimer's disease, enhances several key functions of immune cells. The results obtained in the study highlight the importance of immune cells as a target of future development of new therapies for Alzheimer's disease. (2020-09-25)

Decreased protein degradation in cerebellum leads to motor dysfunction
A research team from Kumamoto University, Japan has developed an animal model that reproduces motor dysfunction and cerebellar neurodegeneration similar to that in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) by inhibiting chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in cerebellar neurons. Since CMA activity is reduced in cells expressing SCA causing proteins, CMA is expected to become a new therapeutic target for SCA--a disease that currently has no basic treatment. (2020-09-23)

Neurological consequences of COVID-19: The 'Silent Wave'
Is the world prepared a wave of neurological consequences that may be on its way as a result of COVID-19? This question is at the forefront of research underway at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health. A team of neuroscientists and clinicians are examining the potential link between COVID-19 and increased risk of Parkinson's disease, and measures to get ahead of the curve. (2020-09-22)

Biomarker indicating neurodegeneration identified in the eye
A new study led by Boston Medical Center researchers indicates a well-known biomarker that serves as a marker for earlier diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is now detectable in the eye. Neurofilament light chain, a protein previously detected in cerebrospinal fluid and blood that is being explored as a biomarker to detect neurodegeneration, has now been identified in the vitreous humor, or fluid within the eye. (2020-09-21)

Study finds novel mechanism that may confer protection against glaucoma
A team of researchers from LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence and the University of Copenhagen provides the first evidence that patients with ocular hypertension may exhibit superior antioxidant protection that promotes resistance to the elevated intraocular pressure associated with glaucoma. (2020-09-17)

New gene implicated in neuron diseases
Healthy NEMF helps the cell recycle garbled protein fragments. But several mutant forms resulted in neuromuscular, neurodegenerative or other ALS-like disease, the scientists found. (2020-09-16)

Older people with early, asymptomatic Alzheimer's at risk of falls
Older people without cognitive problems who experience a fall may have undetected neurodegeneration in their brains that puts them at high risk of developing Alzheimer's dementia, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (2020-09-14)

Investigational drug stops toxic proteins tied to neurodegenerative diseases
An investigational drug that targets an instigator of the TDP-43 protein, a well-known hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), may reduce the protein's buildup and neurological decline associated with these disorders, suggests a pre-clinical study from researchers at Penn Medicine and Mayo Clinic. Results were published in Science Translational Medicine. (2020-09-08)

Nerve cells with energy saving program
Thanks to a metabolic adjustment, the cells can remain functional despite damage to the mitochondria. (2020-08-31)

Study points to potential new approach to treating glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have shown for the first time that when one optic nerve in the eye is damaged, as in glaucoma, the opposite optic nerve comes to the rescue by sharing its metabolic energy. (2020-07-21)

Gene yields insights into the causes of neurodegeneration
Cornell researchers including Fenghua Hu, associate professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and member of the Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, are taking a closer look at the factors that cause Alzheimer's, FTLD and similar diseases. Hu's latest study, ''A role of the frontotemporal lobar degeneration risk factor TMEM106B in myelination,'' was published June 23 in the journal Brain. (2020-07-09)

How are misfolded membrane proteins cleared from cells by "reubiquitinase"?
Chinese researchers recently discovered a protein quality control mechanism called ''reubiquitination'', which could promote the elimination of misfolded membrane proteins, minimize their dwell time in cells, and thereby reduce their probability to form toxic aggregates in human body. (2020-07-08)

Why memory-forming neurons are vulnerable to Alzheimer's
Scientists have used advanced technology to 'micro-dissect' the first brain cells to perish in Alzheimer's disease. The result is a short list of genes that could represent new drug targets. (2020-07-01)

It's not just Alzheimer's disease: Sanders-Brown research highlights form of dementia
The long-running study on aging and brain health at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging Alzheimer's Disease Center has once again resulted in important new findings -- highlighting a complex and under-recognized form of dementia. (2020-06-26)

Researchers model human stem cells to identify degeneration in glaucoma
More than 3 million Americans have glaucoma, a serious eye condition causing vision loss. Using human stem cell models, researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine found they could analyze deficits within cells damaged by glaucoma, with the potential to use this information to develop new strategies to slow the disease process. (2020-06-11)

New evidence for a blood-based biomarker for Alzheimer's disease
Neurofilament light chain (NfL) has great potential as a biomarker for early detection of Alzheimer's disease and could be also useful for monitoring treatment response for that condition. (2020-05-27)

A natural amino acid could be a novel treatment for polyglutamine diseases
Researchers from Osaka University, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, and Niigata University identified the amino acid arginine as a potential disease-modifying drug for polyglutamine diseases, including familial spinocerebellar ataxia and Huntington disease. Using various mice models of polyglutamine diseases, they showed that arginine prevents polyglutamine protein aggregation, improves motor function and suppresses neurodegeneration of mice. The results of this study could facilitate the clinical use of arginine for polyglutamine diseases that are, to date, incurable. (2020-05-25)

Study finds that aging neurons accumulate DNA damage
MIT neuroscientists have discovered that an enzyme called HDAC1 is critical for repairing age-related DNA damage to genes involved in memory and other cognitive functions. HDAC1 is often diminished in both Alzheimer's patients and in normally aging adults, and the study suggests restoring it could have positive benefits for both groups. (2020-05-18)

Cortexyme publishes data on P. gingivalis ability to infect neurons
Cortexyme, Inc. (Nasdaq: CRTX), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company pioneering a novel, disease-modifying therapeutic approach to treat what it believes to be a key underlying cause of Alzheimer's (AD) and other degenerative diseases, today announced the publication of research further documenting the ability of the pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis to invade neurons and trigger Alzheimer's-like neuropathology. (2020-05-06)

Scientists identify a potential treatment candidate for early type 2 diabetic retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy is one of the main vascular complications of type 2 diabetes, and the most common cause of visual deterioration in adults. A new study in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, reports on the efficacy of a possible treatment candidate that showed anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects on the retina and optic nerve head in early type 2 diabetic retinopathy using a diabetic mouse model. (2020-04-27)

NEI researchers link age-related DNA modifications to susceptibility to eye disease
National Eye Institute (NEI) researchers profiling epigenomic changes in light-sensing mouse photoreceptors have a clearer picture of how age-related eye diseases may be linked to age-related changes in the regulation of gene expression. The findings, published online April 21 in Cell Reports, suggest that the epigenome could be targeted as a therapeutic strategy to prevent leading causes of vision loss, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). (2020-04-21)

Gene-network analysis is a valuable new tool for understanding Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from Osaka University, Niigata University, and the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology have found that disruption of protein domain networks that are driven by the RAC1 gene is associated with behavioral and neurological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Their findings establish the value of using an integrated network approach to investigate the mechanisms and potential treatments for Alzheimer's disease. (2020-04-14)

Inhibition of sphingolipid metabolism and neurodegenerative diseases
Disrupting the production of a class of lipids known as sphingolipids in neurons improved symptoms of neurodegeneration and increased survival in a mouse model. (2020-04-13)

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