Current Neurology News and Events

Current Neurology News and Events, Neurology News Articles.
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Yale scientists repair injured spinal cord using patients' own stem cells
Intravenous injection of bone marrow derived stem cells (MSCs) in patients with spinal cord injuries led to significant improvement in motor functions, researchers from Yale University and Japan report Feb. 18 in the Journal of Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery. (2021-02-22)

Prostate drug associated with lower risk of Parkinson's disease
Taking a particular type of medication to treat enlarged prostate is associated with a reduced risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a large observational study by researchers at the University of Iowa, and colleagues in Denmark and China. The findings, published in JAMA Neurology, suggest that terazosin, and similar medications, might have potential to prevent or delay the development of Parkinson's disease. (2021-02-01)

Brain pressure disorder that causes headache, vision problems on rise
A new study has found a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension is on the rise, and the increase corresponds with rising obesity rates. The study is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that for women, socioeconomic factors like income, education and housing may play a role in their risk. (2021-01-20)

Hematopoietic stem cell transplants may provide long-term benefit for people with MS
A new study shows that intense immunosuppression followed by a hematopoietic stem cell transplant may prevent disability associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) from getting worse in 71% of people with relapsing-remitting MS for up to 10 years after the treatment. The research is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that in some people their disability improved over 10 years after treatment. (2021-01-20)

Fatty acid may help combat multiple sclerosis
The abnormal immune system response that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) by attacking and damaging the central nervous system can be triggered by the lack of a specific fatty acid in fat tissue, according to a new Yale study. The finding suggests that dietary change might help treat some people with the autoimmune disease. (2021-01-19)

T cells linked to myelin implicated in MS-like disease in monkeys
Scientists have uncovered new clues implicating a type of herpes virus as the cause of a central nervous system disease in monkeys that's similar to multiple sclerosis in people. By linking two specific T cells to the loss of myelin, scientists say the new study opens the possibility of developing an antiviral therapy that could be especially useful for newly diagnosed cases of multiple sclerosis. (2021-01-15)

Study suggests compound protects myelin, nerve fibers
A compound developed at Oregon Health & Science University appears to protect nerve fibers and the fatty sheath, called myelin, that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. The new research in a mouse model advances earlier work to develop the compound - known as sobetirome - that has already showed promise in stimulating the repair of myelin. (2021-01-13)

Gene therapy strategy found effective in mouse model of hereditary disease TSC
Patients with a genetic disorder called tuberous sclerosis complex have noncancerous tumors growing in numerous organs, and their treatment options are limited. A gene therapy strategy effectively treated mice that express one of the mutated genes that cause the disease. (2021-01-08)

Bedside EEG test can aid prognosis in unresponsive brain injury patients
Assessing the ability of unresponsive patients with severe brain injury to understand what is being said to them could yield important insights into how they might recover, according to new research. (2021-01-05)

Common brain malformation traced to its genetic roots
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that Chiari 1 malformation can be caused by variations in two genes linked to brain development, and that children with large heads are at increased risk of developing the condition. (2020-12-28)

Neurology patients faced with rising out-of-pocket costs for tests, office visits
Just like with drug costs, the amount of money people pay out-of-pocket for diagnostic tests and office visits for neurologic conditions has risen over 15 years, according to a new study published in the December 23, 2020, online issue of issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-12-23)

People in rural areas less likely to receive specialty care for neurologic conditions
A new study has found that while the prevalence of neurologic conditions like dementia, stroke, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS) is consistent across the U.S., the distribution of neurologists is not, and people in more rural areas may be less likely to receive specialty care for certain neurologic conditions. The study, funded by the American Academy of Neurology, is published in the December 23, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-12-23)

Neuroendovascular procedures linked to patient back pain
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care performed a prospective study of neuroendovascular patients and found more than 40% suffered back pain during the procedure, signaling a need for clinicians to be more proactive in addressing this complaint. (2020-12-17)

Antiepileptic drug reduces motor neuron excitability in ALS
The antiepileptic drug ezogabine reduced pathologic excitability of cortical and spinal motor neuron cells that are early signs of clinical dysfunction in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a study conducted by the Neurological Clinical Research Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In addition, the multi-site study involves the first clinical investigation of ALS using a drug identified through an induced pluripotent stem cell model. (2020-12-10)

New biomarker candidate for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
A research team from the Centre for Protein Diagnostics (Prodi) at Ruhr University Bochum (RUB), in collaboration with scientists from Dresden Technical University, Essen University Hospital and University Hospital Göttingen, has developed a diagnostic tool for the rare neurological disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study used the patented immuno-infrared sensor to analyse folding changes of proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of ALS patients after specific binding. (2020-12-09)

Five-minute EEG recordings: a key to the symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Pathological changes related to the disability of Parkinson's patients can already be detected in signals from the scalp without the need to open the skull. Researchers from Leipzig University Hospital and the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences recently published these new findings in the journal Brain. (2020-12-09)

Study finds 10 metabolites associated with risk of stroke
Metabolites are small molecules found in our body's cells. They come from the food we eat, chemical processes happening within our bodies and microbes. A new analysis of recent studies has found that the levels of 10 metabolites detected in the blood are associated with a person's risk of stroke. The research is published in the December 2, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-12-02)

Forest fires, cars, power plants join list of risk factors for Alzheimer's disease
A new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco has found that among older Americans with cognitive impairment, the greater the air pollution in their neighborhood, the higher the likelihood of amyloid plaques - a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. The study adds to a body of evidence indicating that pollution from cars, factories, power plants and forest fires joins established dementia risk factors like smoking and diabetes. (2020-11-30)

New study reveals undetected rare neurodegenerative disorder that looks like Parkinson's disease
New Singapore study suggests that patients who are carriers of NIID gene mutation may also present with symptoms and signs of Parkinson's disease (PD), and respond to PD drugs. (2020-11-06)

COVID-19 linked to worse stroke outcomes
People who experience strokes while infected with COVID-19 appear to be left with greater disability after the stroke, according a study led by UCL and UCLH researchers. (2020-11-05)

A novel immunotherapy proves effective in animal models of multiple sclerosis
Jefferson researchers develop an approach to specifically impede the autoimmune response that drives the disease, while leaving the rest of the immune system fully functioning. (2020-11-04)

Married, single, kids or not, participating in workforce may protect women's memory
Women who work in the paid labor force in early adulthood and middle age may have slower memory decline later in life than women who do not work for pay, according to a new study published in the November 4, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-11-04)

Study raises questions about role of leisure activity in dementia
Studies have suggested that taking part in leisure activities such as playing cards or gardening may be associated with a lower risk of developing dementia. But a new study found no association between taking part in leisure activities at age 56 and the risk of dementia over the next 18 years. The study is published in the October 28, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-10-28)

Antiseizure medication in pregnancy associated with twice the risk of autism in child
Women with epilepsy who take the antiseizure drug valproic acid while pregnant are at more than double the risk of having children with autism spectrum disorder and nearly double the risk of having children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study in the October 28, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-10-28)

ALS and frontotemporal dementia: early diagnosis thanks to an experimental test
A test to diagnose two very serious diseases such as ALS and FTD when the pathologies have not yet appeared: a new methodology succeeds in detecting the protein TDP-43 - the same that accumulates in the brain of patients - even when it is present in minute quantities in the body. Since there are currently no treatments that can interfere with the course of the two diseases, early detection could be of great help to develop useful drugs and understand their dynamics (2020-10-26)

Risk score predicts prognosis of outpatients with COVID-19
A new artificial intelligence-based score considers multiple factors to predict the prognosis of individual patients with COVID-19 seen at urgent care clinics or emergency departments. The tool, which was created by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital, can be used to rapidly and automatically determine which patients are most likely to develop complications and need to be hospitalized. (2020-10-26)

New population of immune cells could play a role in multiple sclerosis
Researchers uncover defining features of a subset of T-cells that may drive autoimmunity in MS, and could prove to be a new target for therapy. (2020-10-23)

Report calls for easing access, improving home health for older adults
Older adults have suffered disproportionately from the COVID-19 pandemic, with increased risk of severe illness and death reported across the globe. A new report argues that one policy change made during the pandemic should remain in place after the novel coronavirus virus fades away: better access to home health services through Medicare. In a set of recommendations published by the Commonwealth Fund, researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and Duke University argue for regulatory changes to expand the Medicare home health benefit. (2020-10-22)

USC study reveals one-two punch of symptoms that exacerbate Alzheimer's
A new Alzheimer's study found that impaired blood flow in the brain is correlated with the buildup of tau tangles, a hallmark indicator of cognitive decline.The work suggests that treatments targeting vascular health in the brain -- as well as amyloid plaques and tau tangles -- may be more effective in preserving memory (2020-10-16)

Investigational ALS drug prolongs patient survival in clinical trial
An experimental medication that was recently shown to slow the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has now demonstrated the potential to also prolong patient survival. The findings come from a clinical trial conducted by investigators at the Sean M. Healey & AMG Center for ALS at Massachusetts General Hospital and Amylyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the company that manufactures the medication. (2020-10-16)

Simple sugar possible therapy for repairing myelin in multiple sclerosis
N-acetylglucosamine, a simple sugar found in human breast milk and sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement in the United States, promotes myelin repair in mouse models and correlates with myelination levels in multiple sclerosis patients according to a new University of California, Irvine-led study. (2020-10-07)

Could arm squeezes with blood pressure cuffs help the brain recover after stroke?
People who are given clot-busting drugs after a stroke may recover better if they also are given a therapy called remote ischemic postconditioning, according to a new study published in the October 7, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Remote ischemic conditioning is when blood flow, and the oxygen it carries, is stopped and then restored repeatedly by blood pressure cuffs worn on the arms. (2020-10-07)

Study reveals risk factors for acute kidney injury after brain hemorrhage
Patients who suffer an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) face an increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) during their hospitalization. AKI can lead to sudden kidney failure, kidney damage or even death. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have determined which ICH patients are at the highest risk for this kidney injury so doctors can take precautions to prevent it. (2020-10-05)

People with Parkinson's disease have a higher risk of dying from COVID-19
A new database analysis of approximately 80,000 patients shows that people with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a 30% higher death rate from COVID-19 than people without the neurodegenerative condition. The new analysis of patient data in the TriNetX COVID-19 research network conducted by University of Iowa researchers and published in Movement Disorders suggests that Parkinson's disease is an independent risk factor for dying from COVID-19. (2020-10-01)

Even in people with Parkinson's gene, coffee may be protective
Even for people with a gene mutation tied to Parkinson's disease, coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of actually developing the disease, according to a new study published in the September 30, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-09-30)

"There's no place like home" for rehab after stroke
Stroke patients who get professional rehabilitation training in their homes through live video consultations may recover their motor skills better than those who do their rehab in person with a therapist at an outpatient rehabilitation facility, according to a study published in the September 30, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Remote rehabilitation may also promote greater brain connectivity, the study said. (2020-09-30)

Noninvasive sleep test may help diagnose and predict dementia in older adults
Researchers have discovered and validated a marker of dementia that may help clinicians identify patients who have the condition or are at risk of developing it. (2020-09-28)

The impact of COVID-19 on access to Parkinson's disease medication
A global survey of health professionals has shown that during the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with Parkinson's disease in large parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin and South America experienced difficulty in accessing their medication, which is likely to have led to deterioration of symptom control. (2020-09-21)

Unverricht-Lundborg disease is more common in Finland than elsewhere in the world
Based on reported cases, Unverricht-Lundborg disease, also known as progressive myoclonic epilepsy-1A, EPM1, is more common in Finland than anywhere else in the world, a new study finds. (2020-09-18)

World's first major study into MS and pregnancy reveals it delays onset of MS symptoms by more than 3 years
A comprehensive international study, led by Monash researchers, has definitively found that pregnancy can delay the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) by more than 3 years. (2020-09-14)

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