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Current Neurology News and Events, Neurology News Articles.
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Meta-analysis: Bug and weed killers, solvents may increase risk of Parkinson's disease
A large analysis of more than 100 studies from around the world shows that exposure to pesticides, or bug and weed killers, and solvents is likely associated with a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease. The research appears in the May 28, 2013, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-05-27)

Migraine and depression together may be linked with brain size
Older people with a history of migraines and depression may have smaller brain tissue volumes than people with only one or neither of the conditions, according to a new study in the May 22, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-05-22)

Wolters Kluwer Health receives 13 awards from the ASHPE
Wolters Kluwer Health is pleased to announce that its Lippincott Williams & Wilkins published journals won 13 ASHPE awards in 10 categories. ASHPE's annual awards competition recognizes member articles and publications for editorial, design, print and online award categories. (2013-05-20)

Diabetes drug tested in Parkinson's disease patients
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Dr. Thomas Foltynie and colleagues at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London investigated the use of a drug approved for diabetes care, Exenatide, in PD patients. (2013-05-20)

Skin cancer may be linked to lower risk of Alzheimer's disease
People who have skin cancer may be less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to new research published in the May 15, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The link does not apply to melanoma, a less common but more aggressive type of skin cancer. (2013-05-15)

Alzheimer's markers predict start of mental decline
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have helped identify many of the biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease that could potentially predict which patients will develop the disorder later in life. Now, studying spinal fluid samples and health data from 201 research participants at the Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, the researchers have shown the markers are accurate predictors of Alzheimer's years before symptoms develop. (2013-05-14)

Could eating peppers prevent Parkinson's?
New research reveals that Solanaceae--a flowering plant family with some species producing foods that are edible sources of nicotine--may provide a protective effect against Parkinson's disease. The study appearing today in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child Neurology Society, suggests that eating foods that contain even a small amount of nicotine, such as peppers and tomatoes, may reduce risk of developing Parkinson's. (2013-05-09)

MS may not be as rare as thought in African-Americans
Contrary to a widely accepted belief, African-Americans may have a higher rather than lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis than Caucasians, according to a new study in the May 7, 2013, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-05-06)

World-first study predicts epilepsy seizures in humans
A small device implanted in the brain has accurately predicted epilepsy seizures in humans in a world-first study led by Professor Mark Cook, Chair of Medicine at the University of Melbourne and Director of Neurology at St. Vincent's Hospital. (2013-05-01)

More evidence suggests eating omega 3s and avoiding meat, dairy linked to preserving memory
The largest study to date finds that eating foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish, chicken and salad dressing and avoiding saturated fats, meat and dairy foods may be linked to preserving memory and thinking abilities. However, the same association was not found in people with diabetes. The research is published in the April 30, 2013, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-04-29)

Study: Teen years may be critical in later stroke risk
The teenage years may be a key period of vulnerability related to living in the (2013-04-24)

ALS trial shows novel therapy is safe
An investigational treatment for an inherited form of Lou Gehrig's disease has passed an early phase clinical trial for safety, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Massachusetts General Hospital report. (2013-04-23)

Swedish study suggests reduced risk of dementia
A new Swedish study published in the journal Neurology shows that the risk of developing dementia may have declined over the past 20 years, in direct contrast to what many previously assumed. (2013-04-19)

The doctor won't see you now? Study: US facing a neurologist shortage
Americans with brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or multiple sclerosis who need to see a neurologist may face longer wait times or have more difficulty finding a neurologist, according to a new study published in the April 17, 2013, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-04-17)

Fainting may run in families while triggers may not
New research suggests that fainting may be genetic and, in some families, only one gene may be responsible. However, a predisposition to certain triggers, such as emotional distress or the sight of blood, may not be inherited. The study is published in the April 16, 2013, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-04-15)

Shift of language function to right hemisphere impedes post-stroke aphasia recovery
In a study designed to differentiate why some stroke patients recover from aphasia and others do not, investigators have found that a compensatory reorganization of language function to right hemispheric brain regions bodes poorly for language recovery. Patients who recovered from aphasia showed a return to normal left-hemispheric language activation patterns. These results, which may open up new rehabilitation strategies, are available in the current issue of Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience. (2013-04-04)

Hallucinations of musical notation: New paper for neurology journal Brain by Oliver Sacks
Professor of neurology, physician, and author Oliver Sacks M.D. has outlined case studies of hallucinations of musical notation, and commented on the neural basis of such hallucinations, in a new paper for the neurology journal Brain. (2013-04-04)

Phase 1 ALS trial is first to test antisense treatment of neurodegenerative disease
The initial clinical trial of a novel approach to treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -- blocking production of a mutant protein that causes an inherited form of the progressive neurodegenerative disease -- may be a first step towards a new era in the treatment of such disorders. (2013-04-03)

Tests to predict heart problems may be more useful predictor of memory loss than dementia tests
Risk prediction tools that estimate future risk of heart disease and stroke may be more useful predictors of future decline in cognitive abilities, or memory and thinking, than a dementia risk score, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2013, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-04-01)

Could that cold sore increase your risk of memory problems?
The virus that causes cold sores, along with other viral or bacterial infections, may be associated with cognitive problems, according to a new study published in the March 26, 2013, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-03-25)

Did evolution give us inflammatory disease?
Researchers demonstrate that some variants in our genes which could put a person at risk for inflammatory diseases -- such as multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease or rheumatoid arthritis -- have been the target of natural selection over the course of human history. (2013-03-22)

Innovative neurology text includes patient videos
Practical Neurology Visual Review, a powerful educational tool for mastering the clinical practice of neurologic diagnosis, is now available in a fully revised and updated Second Editon. (2013-03-20)

Depression in Alzheimer's patients associated with declining ability to handle daily activities
More symptoms of depression and lower cognitive status are independently associated with a more rapid decline in the ability to handle tasks of everyday living, according to a study by Columbia University Medical Center researchers in this month's Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. (2013-03-19)

AAN issues updated sports concussion guideline
With more than one million athletes now experiencing a concussion each year in the United States, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has released an evidence-based guideline for evaluating and managing athletes with concussion. This new guideline replaces the 1997 AAN guideline on the same topic. The new guideline is published in the March 18, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-03-18)

MS patients did not benefit from CCSVI intervention
The first controlled clinical trial to test the safety and efficacy of interventional endovascular therapy on the symptoms and progression of multiple sclerosis has found that the intervention, sometimes called the (2013-03-15)

New drugs may improve quality of life for people with Parkinson's disease
Three studies released today present possible positive news for people with Parkinson's disease. The studies, which will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego, March 16 to 23, 2013, report on treatments for blood pressure problems, the wearing-off that can occur when people have taken the main drug for Parkinson's for a long time, and for people early in the disease whose symptoms are not well-controlled by their main drugs. (2013-03-14)

AAN: Doctors caution against prescribing attention-boosting drugs for healthy kids
The American Academy of Neurology, the world's largest professional association of neurologists, is releasing a position paper on how the practice of prescribing drugs to boost cognitive function, or memory and thinking abilities, in healthy children and teens is misguided. (2013-03-13)

No attention-boosting drugs for healthy kids, doctors urge
Doctors at Yale School of Medicine and the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) have called upon their fellow physicians to limit or end the practice of prescribing memory-enhancing drugs to healthy children whose brains are still developing. Their position statement is published in the Mar. 13 online issue of the journal Neurology, the medical journal of the AAN. (2013-03-13)

Study: Brain imaging after mild head injury/concussion can show lesions
Brain imaging soon after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or mild concussion can detect tiny lesions that may eventually provide a target for treating people with mTBI, according to a study released today and that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego, March 16 to 23, 2013. (2013-03-12)

New add-on drug may improve memory in people with moderate Alzheimer's disease
A new drug may improve memory problems in people with moderate Alzheimer's disease, according to a phase IIa study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego, March 16 to 23, 2013. The drug is called ORM-12741. (2013-03-11)

Sleep loss precedes Alzheimer's symptoms
Sleep is disrupted in people who likely have early Alzheimer's disease but do not yet have the memory loss or other cognitive problems characteristic of full-blown disease, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report March 11 in JAMA Neurology. (2013-03-11)

Common MS drugs taken together do not reduce relapse risk
A recent clinical trial found that interferonβ-1a and glatiramer acetate, two of the most commonly prescribed drugs for multiple sclerosis (MS), provide no additional clinical benefit when taken together. (2013-03-11)

Early detection of MS treatment complication may improve survival
The drug natalizumab is effective for treating multiple sclerosis, but it increases the risk of a rare but potentially fatal brain infection called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). A study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego, Mar. 16 to 23, 2013, suggests that early detection of PML may help improve survival and disability levels. (2013-03-10)

Can hormone help treat multiple sclerosis long-term?
A new study suggests that treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone may be helpful for people whose multiple sclerosis is not well-controlled through their regular treatment. The study was released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego, Mar. 16 to 23, 2013. (2013-03-10)

UTHealth research: Low incidence of venous insufficiency in MS
Results of a study using several imaging methods showed that chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency occurs at a low rate in both people with multiple sclerosis and non-MS volunteers, contrary to some previous studies. The research by an interdisciplinary team at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston was published in a recent early online edition of the Annals of Neurology. (2013-03-07)

People with MS-related memory and attention problems have signs of extensive brain damage
People with multiple sclerosis who have cognitive problems, or problems with memory, attention, and concentration, have more damage to areas of the brain involved in cognitive processes than people with MS who do not have cognitive problems, according to a study published in the March 6, 2013, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-03-06)

Salt identified as autoimmune trigger
For the past few decades, health officials have been reporting increases in the incidence of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Now researchers at Yale School of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute have identified a prime suspect in the mystery -- dietary salt. (2013-03-06)

Mayo Clinic researchers identify possible treatment window for memory problems
Researchers have identified a possible treatment window of several years for plaques in the brain that are thought to cause memory loss in diseases such as Alzheimer's. The Mayo Clinic study is published in the Feb. 27 online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-02-27)

Antioxidants in your diet may not reduce risk of stroke or dementia
Contrary to other research, a new study found that the total level of antioxidants in people's diets is not related to their risk of developing stroke or dementia. The study is published in the Feb. 20, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Antioxidants such as lycopene, beta-carotene and vitamins C and E are found in many foods. (2013-02-20)

Blood may hold clues to risk of memory problems after menopause, Mayo study finds
New Mayo Clinic research suggests that blood may hold clues to whether post-menopausal women may be at an increased risk for areas of brain damage that can lead to memory problems and possibly increased risk of stroke. The study shows that blood's tendency to clot may contribute to areas of brain damage called white matter hyperintensities. The findings are published in the Feb. 13 online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2013-02-13)

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