Current Neuron News and Events | Page 2

Current Neuron News and Events, Neuron News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
University of Pittsburgh neuroscientists advance understanding of pain from light touch
Researchers from the Pittsburgh Center for Pain Research uncovered additional complexities behind mechanical allodynia - the sensation of pain from innocuous stimuli, such as light touch. (2020-11-11)

Potential brain damage marker could guide assessment and treatment of strokes
A team of researchers has discovered that a protein found in the nervous system can predict the severity of brain damage and long-term outcomes in patients who have suffered a stroke. (2020-11-11)

Printable ink guides cell growth, offers nerve injury hope
New research has cracked a major challenge in the emerging field of nerve engineering. The ink can concentrate neuron growth where it is needed, meticulously guiding cells to regrow in lines between the broken ends of a nerve. (2020-11-10)

Surprising insights into the role of autophagy in neuron
Autophagy protects our neurons in the brain, but for entirely different reasons than previously assumed, as researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) and Charité in Berlin have shown. When the scientists used a genetic trick to switch off autophagy-mediated ''cellular waste disposal'', they found elevated levels of the endoplasmic reticulum, which acts, among other functions, as a calcium store. This leads to elevated neurotransmitter release and, ultimately, to fatal neuronal hyperexcitability. (2020-11-05)

Mouse studies link some autism to brain cells that guide sociability and platonic love
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that new experiments with genetically engineered mice have found clear connections among a range of autism types and abnormalities in brain cells whose chemical output forges platonic (non-sexual) feelings of love and sociability. (2020-10-29)

Brainstem neurons control both behaviour and misbehaviour
A recent study at the University of Helsinki reveals how gene control mechanisms define the identity of developing neurons in the brainstem. The researchers also showed that a failure in differentiation of the brainstem neurons leads to behavioural abnormalities, including hyperactivity and attention deficit. (2020-10-29)

Brain imaging of tau protein in patients with various forms of dementia
A new imaging-based method could enable the early detection and differentiation of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the buildup of tau protein in the brain, suggests an October 29 in the journal Neuron. The researchers demonstrate that the method enables sensitive detection of tau deposits in mice and in patients with Alzheimer's disease and various frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) disorders. The authors say the approach could also be used to evaluate disease mechanisms or anti-tau therapies. (2020-10-29)

How allergens trigger itching: Finding points to new targets for allergy drug development
A key step in the immune system's response to allergens has been uncovered by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. They have shown that a neuropeptide called Substance P is released by certain neurons in the skin when they detect allergens, and that this substance is essential in the development of allergen-induced immune responses. This research could lead to the development of new and better methods to treat and prevent allergies. (2020-10-29)

QCLs exhibit extreme pulses
Based on a quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting mid-infrared light, the researchers developed a basic optical neuron system operating 10,000× faster than biological neurons. Their report is published in Advanced Photonics. (2020-10-23)

Findings shed light on the ancient origins of speed control during movement
Movement in animals is complex. Little has been known about how spinal inhibitory interneurons work to silence other neurons and related muscle groups in coordination with the active muscle groups across changing speeds. Now a Northwestern University research team has discovered in a study of zebrafish that there is a very orderly relationship between when these critical inhibitory neurons are born, their participation in different speeds of movement and what part of a motor neuron they innervate. (2020-10-22)

Thermal vision of snakes inspires soft pyroelectric materials
Converting heat into electricity is a property thought to be reserved only for stiff materials like crystals. However, researchers--inspired by the infrared (IR) vision of snakes--developed a mathematical model for converting soft, organic structures into so-called 'pyroelectric' materials. The study, appearing October 21, 2020 in the journal Matter, proves that soft matter can be transformed into a pyroelectric material and potentially solves a long-held mystery surrounding the mechanism of IR vision in snakes. (2020-10-21)

Lineage tracing of direct astrocyte-to-neuron conversion for brain repair
A research team led by Prof. Gong Chen at Jinan University (Guangzhou, China) published a work on October 9th in Neural Regeneration Research, providing unambiguous data that brain internal astrocytes are directly converted into neurons through lineage tracing studies. Using brain internal astrocytes, a type of supporting cells to neurons, to directly convert into new neurons is an innovative brain repair technology that may benefit millions of patients worldwide. (2020-10-16)

Remembering novelty
The brain and its functions still pose many open questions. One of them is how exactly we form long-term memories about the environment. In a new study Ryuichi Shigemoto and his group from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) together with researchers from Aarhus University and the National Institute for Physiological Sciences in Japan discovered a new signaling pathway in the hippocampus area of the brain that regulates how information about new environments is transferred into long-term memory. (2020-10-15)

A new approach to analyzing the morphology of dendritic spines
Dendritic spines are small protrusions from a neuron's dendrite membrane, where contact with neighboring axons is formed to receive synaptic input. Changes in the characteristics of the dendritic spines are associated with learning and memory and could be a feature of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Scientists examined a novel approach to analyzing the dendritic spine shapes. (2020-10-12)

Taking the STING out of MND
Melbourne researchers are working towards a potential treatment to slow the progression of motor neuron disease (MND). The research team have uncovered how inflammation in MND is triggered. Pinpointing the molecules involved in this pathway could be a first step towards a new treatment for MND. (2020-10-07)

Study finds odor-sensing neuron regeneration process is adaptive
Results show that diminished odor stimulation reduces the number of newly-generated neurons that express particular odorant receptors, indicating a selective alteration in the neurogenesis of these neuron subtypes. (2020-10-06)

Advances in nonhormone therapies provide women with more options for managing hot flashes
Although many women manage menopause symptoms with hormone therapy, increasing numbers of women are considering nonhormone options. Dr. Susan Reed from the University of Washington School of Medicine is a featured speaker during the 2020 Pre-Meeting Symposium of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) and will discuss the latest advances in nonhormone hot flash management. One of the more promising drug developments targets the KNDy neuron complex. (2020-09-28)

AI learns to trace neuronal pathways
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists dramatically improved the efficiency of automated methods for tracing neuronal connections. They taught a computer to recognize different parts of neurons, then used the math of topology to see how those neurons are likely to connect. (2020-09-28)

Nerve cells let others "listen in"
How many ''listeners'' a nerve cell has in the brain is strictly regulated. This is shown by an international study led by the University College London and the universities of Bonn, Bordeaux and Milton Keynes (England). In the environment of learning neurons, certain processes are set in motion that make signal transmission less exclusive. The results have now been published in the journal Neuron. (2020-09-25)

Bird brains' cortex-like structure may be behind complex cognition, and even consciousness
Informing the century-long riddle of why some birds, despite having a radically different forebrain organization than mammals, demonstrate comparable cognitive abilities, two new studies report that a neuron-dense part of the avian brain, the pallium, may help birds achieve these cognitive feats, including conscious awareness. (2020-09-24)

Princeton researchers discover how worms pass down knowledge through the generations
Princeton researchers Rachel Kaletsky, Rebecca Moore, Coleen Murphy and colleagues have discovered that the microscopic roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans recognizes a small RNA made by a pathogenic bacterium, and uses that RNA to convey learned avoidance of the bacterium to offspring. Their work appears in the Sept. 9, 2020 issue of Nature. (2020-09-17)

How the brain's inner clock measures seconds
UCLA researchers have pinpointed a second hand to the brain's internal clock. By revealing how and where the brain counts and represents seconds, the UCLA discovery will expand scientists' understanding of normal and abnormal brain function. (2020-09-17)

New gene implicated in neuron diseases
Healthy NEMF helps the cell recycle garbled protein fragments. But several mutant forms resulted in neuromuscular, neurodegenerative or other ALS-like disease, the scientists found. (2020-09-16)

Model shows that the speed neurons fire impacts their ability to synchronize
Research conducted by the Computational Neuroscience Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has shown for the first time that a computer model can replicate and explain a unique property displayed by a crucial brain cell. Their findings, published today in eLife, shed light on how groups of neurons can self-organize by synchronizing when they fire fast. (2020-09-08)

Brain estrogen is key to brain protection when oxygen is low
When the brain isn't getting enough oxygen, estrogen produced by neurons in both males and females hyperactivates another brain cell type called astrocytes to step up their usual support and protect brain function. (2020-09-01)

Understanding the link between hearing loss and dementia
Scientists have developed a new theory as to how hearing loss may cause dementia and believe that tackling this sensory impairment early may help to prevent the disease. (2020-09-01)

Overlooked 'housekeeping' gene plays unexpected role in seizures
Molecules known as tRNAs are often overlooked in studies of disease processes. UC San Diego researchers have found that a mutation in a tRNA gene called n-Tr20--expressed only in the brain--can disrupt the landscape of entire cells, leading to chain reactions that alter brain function and behavior. The results are published in the journal Neuron. (2020-08-26)

From photons to feelings: Researchers reveal a color palette in brain
A recent study conducted by researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and Peking University described in greater detail than ever before the anatomical embodiment of color sensations in the cerebral cortex, linking brain structure to perceptual function. (2020-08-26)

Locust swarm could improve collision avoidance
Plagues of locusts, containing millions of insects, fly across the sky to attack crops, but the individual insects do not collide with each other within these massive swarms. Now a team of engineers is creating a low-power collision detector that mimics the locust avoidance response and could help robots, drones and even self-driving cars avoid collisions. (2020-08-24)

Small set of genes may provide unique barcode for different types of brain cells in worms
When it comes to brain cells, one size does not fit all. Neurons come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and contain different types of brain chemicals. A new study in Nature suggests that the identities of all the neurons in a worm are linked to unique members of a single gene family that control the process of converting DNA instructions into proteins, known as gene expression. (2020-08-19)

Potential link for Alzheimer's disease and common brain disease that mimics its symptoms
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital uncovered a group of closely related genes that may capture molecular links between Alzheimer's disease and Limbic-predominant Age-related TDP-43 Encephalopathy, or LATE, a recently recognized common brain disorder that can mimic Alzheimer's symptoms. (2020-08-19)

A bright idea -- Genetically engineered proteins for studying neurons using light
In neuroscience, tools for controlling the activation and deactivation of individual nerve cells are crucial to gain insights into their functions and characteristics. Now, scientists from Okayama University, Japan, have produced mutant variants of a membrane protein that can effectively silence neurons when illuminated. The silencing effect can be quickly ''toggled'' on and off using green and red light sequentially, providing a more sophisticated tool than those currently available. (2020-08-18)

Becoming a nerve cell: Timing is of the essence
A Belgian team of researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen (VIB-KU Leuven) finds that mitochondria regulate a key event during brain development: how neural stem cells become nerve cells. Mitochondria influence this cell fate switch during a precise period that is twice as long in humans compared to mice. This highlights an unexpected function for mitochondria that may help explain how humans developed a bigger brain during evolution, and how mitochondrial defects lead to neurodevelopmental diseases. (2020-08-13)

Evidence in mice that electroacupuncture reduces inflammation via specific neural pathways
Stimulating the nervous system using small electric current by acupuncture could tamp down systemic inflammation in the body, suggests new research in mice from a team of neuroscientists in the US and China. The research, publishing August 12 in the journal Neuron, helps to map the neuroanatomical underpinnings of this ancient medical practice. (2020-08-12)

The bouncer in the brain
How do you keep orientation in a complex environment, like the city of Vienna? You can thank your brain's ''global positioning system'' (GPS), the hippocampus, for this sense of orientation. To further understand its functions, scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) analyzed single neurons of this GPS in mice. They discovered that so-called granule cells filter and sharpen spatial information. The researchers recently published their findings in Neuron. (2020-08-06)

CU researcher: Non-hormonal treatment for menopausal symptoms offers hope of relief
A non-hormonal therapy to treat hot flashes and other symptoms associated with menopause was found to be effective in a recent clinical trial, according to a published study by a team of researchers including faculty from the University of Colorado School of Medicine. (2020-08-06)

Ultra-low power brain implants find meaningful signal in grey matter noise
By tuning into a subset of brain waves, University of Michigan researchers have dramatically reduced the power requirements of neural interfaces while improving their accuracy--a discovery that could lead to long-lasting brain implants that can both treat neurological diseases and enable mind-controlled prosthetics and machines. (2020-07-27)

Neurons are genetically programmed to have long lives
Most neurons are created during embryonic development and have no ''backup'' after birth. Researchers have generally believed that their survival is determined nearly extrinsically, or by outside forces, such as the tissues and cells that neurons supply with nerve cells. A research team led by Sika Zheng, a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has challenged this notion and reports the continuous survival of neurons is also intrinsically programmed during development. (2020-07-24)

Restoring mobility by identifying the neurons that make it possible
Partial mobility can be restored in rodents with impaired spinal cords. Using AI, scientists can now determine the ¬cellular mechanisms responsible -- a technique that may be applicable to many biomedical problems. (2020-07-20)

Neural vulnerability in Huntington's disease tied to release of mitochondrial RNA
A uniquely comprehensive survey of gene expression by cell type in humans and mice revealed several deficits affecting the most vulnerable neurons in Huntigton's disease. (2020-07-17)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.