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Mouse studies link some autism to brain cells that guide sociability and platonic love
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that new experiments with genetically engineered mice have found clear connections among a range of autism types and abnormalities in brain cells whose chemical output forges platonic (non-sexual) feelings of love and sociability. (2020-10-29)
Should I run, or should I not? The neural basis of aggression and flight
Researchers in the Gross group at EMBL Rome have investigated the mechanism behind defensive behaviour in mice. (2020-10-29)
Brainstem neurons control both behaviour and misbehaviour
A recent study at the University of Helsinki reveals how gene control mechanisms define the identity of developing neurons in the brainstem. (2020-10-29)
How allergens trigger itching: Finding points to new targets for allergy drug development
A key step in the immune system's response to allergens has been uncovered by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital. (2020-10-29)
Nucleus accumbens recruited by cocaine, sugar are different
In a study using genetically modified mice, a University of Wyoming faculty member found that the nucleus accumbens recruited by cocaine use are largely distinct from nucleus accumbens recruited by sucrose, or table sugar. (2020-10-28)
Motivation to seek cocaine is driven by elegant cellular communication
In response to cocaine, the connections between neurons, or brain cells, strengthen due to signaling that starts outside those cells, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina and the National Institutes of Health in the Journal of Neuroscience. (2020-10-28)
How do basal ganglia neurons convey information for the control of voluntary movements?
Researchers revealed how neurons in the basal ganglia, which are a brain region crucial for the control of voluntary movements and whose damage induces motor impairment, such as Parkinson's disease, convey information for the movement control by recording activity of multiple neurons simultaneously in Japanese monkeys. (2020-10-27)
Neuron-based gene expression study reveals insights on fear and its regulation
The expression of a gene called CREB in certain neurons may function as a switch to regulate feelings of fear and its extinction. (2020-10-26)
Researchers discover 'spooky' similarity in how brains and computers see
The brain detects 3D shape fragments (bumps, hollows, shafts, spheres) in the beginning stages of object vision - a newly discovered strategy of natural intelligence that Johns Hopkins University researchers also found in artificial intelligence networks trained to recognize visual objects. (2020-10-22)
Findings shed light on the ancient origins of speed control during movement
Movement in animals is complex. Little has been known about how spinal inhibitory interneurons work to silence other neurons and related muscle groups in coordination with the active muscle groups across changing speeds. (2020-10-22)
The consequences of mating at the molecular level
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel mechanism by which mating affects the behavior of germline stem cells (GSCs). (2020-10-20)
The right cells in the right spot
Neurons in a visual brain area of zebrafish are arranged as a map for catching prey. (2020-10-19)
The line of succession
An unusual mechanism of robustness in charge of brain mRNAs (2020-10-19)
Lineage tracing of direct astrocyte-to-neuron conversion for brain repair
A research team led by Prof. Gong Chen at Jinan University (Guangzhou, China) published a work on October 9th in Neural Regeneration Research, providing unambiguous data that brain internal astrocytes are directly converted into neurons through lineage tracing studies. (2020-10-16)
New study may reveal link to lipids playing a key role in Parkinson's disease
New Parkinson's disease model breaks conventional thinking about the roots of Parkinson's disease and may lead to development of new therapies. (2020-10-16)
Classic optical illusion leads to the discovery of critical neurons in zebrafish.
By exposing larval zebrafish to a well-known optical illusion, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology and National Institute of Genetics have found a clever way to isolate key clusters of neurons critical to processing the direction of motion in the zebrafish's environment. (2020-10-15)
Researchers deconstruct the "biological clock" that regulates birdsong
The precise timing of a bird's complex song is driven in part by the often-ignored ''wires'' connecting neurons in the bird's brain, according to a new study. (2020-10-15)
New study reveals how the nervous system mutes or boosts sensory information to make behavioral deci
Fruit flies may be able to teach researchers a thing or two about artificial intelligence. (2020-10-15)
Reelin-Nrp1 interaction regulates neocortical dendrite development
Reelin exhibits a context-dependent function during brain development; however, its underlying mechanism is not well understood. (2020-10-15)
Scientists identify sensor protein that underlies bladder control
A team co-led by scientists at Scripps Research has found that the main sensor protein enabling our sense of touch also underlies the feeling of having a full bladder and makes normal bladder function possible. (2020-10-14)
College of Medicine researcher makes novel discoveries in preventing epileptic seizures
A team of researchers from the Florida State University College of Medicine has found that an amino acid produced by the brain could play a crucial role in preventing a type of epileptic seizure. (2020-10-13)
Mosquitoes' taste for blood traced to four types of neurons
The female mosquito has an amazing ability to detect blood using her syringe-like ''tongue.'' Now scientists have identified the neurons that give her blood-seeking powers. (2020-10-12)
Scientists discover mosquitoes' unique blood-taste detectors
Scientists aren't sure how mosquitoes sense taste of blood, or how they know that this, of all things, is something to gorge on. (2020-10-12)
Nerve cell activity shows how confident we are
Should I or shouldn't I? The activity of individual nerve cells in the brain tells us how confident we are in our decisions. (2020-10-09)
New perspectives to treat neuropschychiatric diseases
Researchers studied the major types of neurons of the prefrontal cortex of the brain in an international collaboration. (2020-10-08)
Cortex-wide variation of neuronal cellular energy levels depending on the sleep-wake states
The brain is assumed to exert homeostatic functions to always keep the cellular energy status constant, this has not been proven. (2020-10-07)
Study identifies brain cells most affected by epilepsy and new targets for their treatment
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified new potential drug targets for treatment of epilepsy. (2020-10-07)
Scientists unpack how the brain separates present from past dangers
A team of neuroscientists has identified processes the brain undergoes to distinguish real and present dangers from those linked to past experiences in mice. (2020-10-07)
Discovery of a new key player in long-term memory
A McGill-led multi-institutional research team has discovered that during memory consolidation, there are at least two distinct processes taking place in two different brain networks - the excitatory and inhibitory networks. (2020-10-07)
The effects of oxytocin on social anxiety depend on location, location, location
The findings of the study show that oxytocin produced in the BNST increases stress-induced social anxiety behaviors in mice. (2020-10-07)
Study finds odor-sensing neuron regeneration process is adaptive
Results show that diminished odor stimulation reduces the number of newly-generated neurons that express particular odorant receptors, indicating a selective alteration in the neurogenesis of these neuron subtypes. (2020-10-06)
Deep-brain imaging at synaptic resolution with adaptive optics 2-photon endomicroscopy
Recognizing the need for improved imaging capabilities, a group of scientists from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) focused their sights on achieving brain imaging at synaptic resolution. (2020-10-06)
Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form
Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study. (2020-10-05)
Researchers identify process for regenerating neurons in the eye and brain
A team of researchers from the University of Notre Dame, Johns Hopkins University, Ohio State University and the University of Florida has identified networks of genes that regulate the process responsible for determining whether neurons will regenerate in certain animals, such as zebrafish. (2020-10-05)
Social novelty has a special place in the brain
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan report that a part of the mouse brain called the SuM is specialized for detecting new experiences. (2020-09-30)
Novel role of microglia as modulators of neurons in the brain is discovered
Findings offer potential target for treating behavioral abnormalities associated with neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's Disease. (2020-09-30)
Cancer cells use nerve-cell tricks to spread from one organ to the next
New research suggests that breast and lung tumors metastasize by hijacking a neural signaling pathway, potentially opening the door to better diagnostics and treatments. (2020-09-30)
Identified the cellular process by which Cisplatin chemotherapy causes neuronal damage
Cisplatin induces senescence of peripheral neurons through overexpression of the p21 protein, which would explain the neuropathy. (2020-09-29)
Finding right drug balance for Parkinson's patients
Parkinson's disease is most commonly treated with levodopa, but the benefits wear off as the disease progresses and high doses can result in dyskinesia, which are involuntary and uncontrollable movements. (2020-09-29)
AI learns to trace neuronal pathways
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists dramatically improved the efficiency of automated methods for tracing neuronal connections. (2020-09-28)
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