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NIH-funded study sheds light on abnormal neural function in rare genetic disorder
A genetic study has identified neuronal abnormalities in the electrical activity of cortical cells derived from people with a rare genetic disorder called 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. (2020-09-28)
Stanford scientists solve secret of nerve cells marking a form of schizophrenia
A common genetic deletion boosts the risk for schizophrenia by 30-fold. (2020-09-28)
Spinal injuries: the recovery of motor skills thanks to nanomaterials
Re-establishing motor skills and neuronal connectivity thanks to the implantation of carbon nanotubes in the injury site. (2020-09-28)
Tone of voice matters in neuronal communication
Neuronal communication is so fast, and at such a small scale, that it is exceedingly difficult to explain precisely how it occurs. (2020-09-28)
Stem cells can repair Parkinson's-damaged circuits in mouse brains
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers demonstrated a proof-of-concept stem cell treatment in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. (2020-09-25)
Twinkling, star-shaped brain cells may hold the key to why, how we sleep
A new study published today in the journal Current Biology suggests that star-shaped brain cells known as astrocytes could be as important to the regulation of sleep as neurons. (2020-09-24)
Researchers demonstrate how deep learning can advance study of neural degeneration
Researchers have demonstrated the utility of artificial intelligence (AI) in identifying and categorizing neural degeneration in the model organism C. elegans. (2020-09-24)
Faulty transportation of messenger RNA is the culprit in ALS
A team including Osaka University researchers has discovered a function for the protein missing in many types of ALS and FTLD, two neurodegenerative diseases. (2020-09-23)
Decreased protein degradation in cerebellum leads to motor dysfunction
A research team from Kumamoto University, Japan has developed an animal model that reproduces motor dysfunction and cerebellar neurodegeneration similar to that in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) by inhibiting chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in cerebellar neurons. (2020-09-23)
New brain cell-like nanodevices work together to identify mutations in viruses
In the September issue of the journal Nature, scientists from Texas A&M University, Hewlett Packard Labs and Stanford University have described a new nanodevice that acts almost identically to a brain cell. (2020-09-23)
A link between sensory neurons activation and the immune system
Scientists at EPFL, ETHZ and Harvard Medical School/Boston Children's Hospital have developed an implantable technology that enabled the discovery of an interaction between sensory neurons and immune cells. (2020-09-21)
Cannabinoids decrease the metabolism of glucose in the brain
What happens when THC acts on the glial cells named astrocytes ? (2020-09-19)
Nose's response to odors more than just a simple sum of parts
Based on highly sensitive recordings of neuron activity in the noses of mice, researchers from Kyushu University have found that olfactory sensory neurons can exhibit suppression or enhancement of response when odors are mixed, overturning a long-standing view that the response is a simple sum with more complex processing only happening at later stages. (2020-09-18)
Mapping the decision-making pathways in the brain
Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have identified a new area of the brain that could be involved in cost-benefit decision-making. (2020-09-18)
Potential target identified for migraine therapy
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) in Japan have identified the protein GLT-1 as the neurotransmitter glutamate transporter in the brain that is related to cortical spreading depression, a pathological condition that underlies migraines. (2020-09-17)
The acrobatic hydra shows off: How environmental cues can affect behavior
A duo from Columbia University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has begun to crack the neural code behind Hydra's simplest behavior, called contraction bursts. (2020-09-17)
Reprogramming brain cells enables flexible decision-making
Humans, like other animals, have the ability to constantly adapt to new situations. (2020-09-16)
Reward and punishment take similar paths in the mouse brain
One brain pathway, originating from the striosome, regulates the motivations that influence behavior. (2020-09-15)
Real neurons are noisy. Can neural implants figure that out?
Signals sent from the retina to the brain have a lot of background noise, yet we see the world clearly. (2020-09-15)
Drug for common liver condition may be an effective treatment for dementia
A team of researchers, led by the University of York, have identified new proteins involved in protecting neurons and discovered that Ursodeoxycholic Acid - an already approved drug, with very low toxicity - increases these proteins and protects neurons from death. (2020-09-14)
Immune cells sculpt circuits in the brain
Brain immune cells, called microglia, protect the brain from infection and inflammation. (2020-09-14)
Neural cartography
A new x-ray microscopy technique could help accelerate efforts to map neural circuits and ultimately the brain itself. (2020-09-14)
Immune system affects mind and body, study indicates
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that a molecule produced by the immune system acts on the brain to change the behavior of mice. (2020-09-14)
How the brain creates the experience of time
On some days, time flies by, while on others it seems to drag on. (2020-09-14)
Heroin-addicted individuals have unique brain disturbances resembling those of Alzheimer's
Herion-addicted individuals have alterations in the expression a gene called FYN - a gene known to regulate the production of Tau, a protein that is highly elevated and implicated in neurocognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease. (2020-09-14)
How does chronic stress induce bone loss?
Researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators have found that bone mineral density in patients with anxiety or depression is lower than in ordinary people. (2020-09-11)
The neurons that connect stress, insomnia, and the immune system
Researchers have pinpointed the circuit in the brain that is responsible for sleepless nights in times of stress--and it turns out that circuit does more than make you toss and turn. (2020-09-09)
Brain's immune cells promising cellular target for therapeutics
Inspired by the need for new and better therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, researchers are exploring the link between uncontrolled inflammation within the brain and the brain's immune cells, known as microglia, which are emerging as a promising cellular target because of the prominent role they play in brain inflammation. (2020-09-08)
Research unravels what makes memories so detailed and enduring
In years to come, our personal memories of the COVID-19 pandemic are likely to be etched in our minds with precision and clarity, distinct from other memories of 2020. (2020-09-08)
Model shows that the speed neurons fire impacts their ability to synchronize
Research conducted by the Computational Neuroscience Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has shown for the first time that a computer model can replicate and explain a unique property displayed by a crucial brain cell. (2020-09-08)
The brain can induce diabetes remission in rodents, but how?
In rodents with type 2 diabetes, a single surgical injection of a protein called fibroblast growth factor 1 can restore blood sugar levels to normal for weeks or months. (2020-09-07)
Rubbing skin activates itch-relief neural pathway
Stop scratching: rubbing skin activates an anti-itch pathway in the spinal cord, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-09-07)
Repulsion mechanism between neurons governs fly brain structure
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Nature Communications the discovery that in the developing fly brain, neurons stemming from the same parent cell experience repulsion. (2020-09-04)
Holistic bursting cells might be basis of brain cognition
Recently, scientists from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with collaborators at home and abroad, presented the discovery of ''holistic bursting'' cells, a novel functional class of cortical neurons that represent learned complex objects as wholes rather than parts. (2020-09-03)
Why naming neurons can help cure brain disease
A group of 74 scientists proposed the use of single-cell RNA sequencing as the skeleton for a unified classification of cortical neurons. (2020-09-02)
Brain estrogen is key to brain protection when oxygen is low
When the brain isn't getting enough oxygen, estrogen produced by neurons in both males and females hyperactivates another brain cell type called astrocytes to step up their usual support and protect brain function. (2020-09-01)
Scent-sensing cells have a better way to fight influenza
Smell receptors that line the nose get hit by Influenza B just like other cells, but they are able to clear the infection without dying. (2020-09-01)
Scientists discover key regulator of neuron function and survival
Scientists studying neuronal energy metabolism found evidence the loss of an important energy regulator called AMPK in neural stem cells or glial cells called astrocytes causes neuronal death in laboratory rodents. (2020-09-01)
Misfiring brain cells may cause swallowing woes in children with developmental disorders
Misfiring brain cells that control key parts of the mouth and tongue may be creating swallowing difficulties in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, according to neuroscientists with Virginia Tech and George Washington University. (2020-09-01)
Nerve cells with energy saving program
Thanks to a metabolic adjustment, the cells can remain functional despite damage to the mitochondria. (2020-08-31)
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