Current Neuroscientists News and Events

Current Neuroscientists News and Events, Neuroscientists News Articles.
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How the 'noise' in our brain influences our behavior
The brain's neural activity is irregular, changing from one moment to the next. To date, this apparent ''noise'' has been thought to be due to random natural variations or measurement error. However, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development have shown that this neural variability may provide a unique window into brain function. (2021-02-17)

Scientists solve long-standing mystery by a whisker
A team of neuroscientists at the University of California, Riverside, has experimented on mice to identify the brain region that functions beyond sensory encoding and motor encoding, potentially opening up new directions to studying the cellular and circuit mechanisms of sensory-motor transformations. The researchers report a cortical region traditionally defined as whisker motor cortex in mice is most directly related to the transformation process. (2021-01-29)

A NEAT reduction of complex neuronal models accelerates brain research
Unlike their simple counterparts in artificial intelligence (AI) applications, neurons in the brain use dendrites - their intricate tree-like branches - to find relevant chunks of information. Now, neuroscientists from the University of Bern have discovered a new computational method to make complex dendrite models much simpler. These faithful reductions may lead AI applications to process information much like the brain does. (2021-01-27)

Neuroscientists identify brain circuit that encodes timing of events
MIT neuroscientists shed new light on how the timing of a memory is encoded in the hippocampus, and suggest that time and space are encoded separately. (2021-01-11)

We hear what we expect to hear
Dresden neuroscientists show that the entire auditory pathway represents sounds according to prior expectations. Their findings have now been published in the renowned scientific journal eLife. (2021-01-08)

A weather station for epileptic seizure
The onset of epileptic seizures is unpredictable. Neuroscientists from the University of Geneva, the University Hospital of Bern and the University of California in San Francisco, have succeeded in developing a technique that can predict seizures between one and several days in advance. By recording neuronal activity over at least six months using a device implanted directly in the brain, it is possible to provide information about the probability of a future seizure. (2020-12-18)

Researchers find 'missing link'
Otago researchers have found the ''missing link between stress and infertility''. (2020-12-03)

Worms reveal why melatonin promotes sleep
Melatonin is used as a dietary supplement to promote sleep and get over jet lag, but nobody really understands how it works in the brain. Now, researchers at UConn Health show that melatonin helps worms sleep, too, and they suspect they've identified what it does in us. (2020-11-13)

New study reveals a holistic way to look at neurons in the brain
A new lens on visual neurons is laying the groundwork for a more complete ''family tree'' of the mammalian brain. A team of researchers from the Allen Institute for Brain Science, a division of the Allen Institute, published a study -- the largest of its kind to date -- in the journal Cell today revealing a new categorization of mouse neurons that relies on multiple types of data drawn from each individual cell. (2020-11-12)

A malformation illustrates the incredible plasticity of the brain
One in 4,000 people is born without a corpus callosum, a brain structure consisting of neural fibres that are used to transfer information between hemisphere. 25% of them do not have any symptoms. Neuroscientists from the University of Geneva discovered that when the neuronal fibres that act as a bridge between the hemispheres are missing, the brain reorganises itself and creates an impressive number of connections inside each hemisphere, recreating connections using alternative neural pathways. (2020-10-30)

Performance test for neural interfaces
Freiburg researchers develop guidelines to standardize analysis of electrodes. (2020-10-28)

Ingestible capsule that could help demystify the gut-brain axis
A team of University of Maryland experts from engineering, neuroscience, applied microbiology, and physics has been making headway on building a platform that can monitor and model the real-time processing of gut microbiome serotonin activity. (2020-10-15)

Sport and memory go hand in hand
If sport is good for the body, it also seems to be good for the brain. By evaluating memory performance following a sport session, neuroscientists from the University of Geneva demonstrate that an intensive physical exercise session improves memory. How? Through the action of endocanabinoids, molecules known to increase synaptic plasticity. School programmes and strategies aimed at reducing the effects of neurodegeneration on memory could benefit from the study. (2020-09-23)

Mapping the decision-making pathways in the brain
Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have identified a new area of the brain that could be involved in cost-benefit decision-making. (2020-09-18)

Research unravels what makes memories so detailed and enduring
In years to come, our personal memories of the COVID-19 pandemic are likely to be etched in our minds with precision and clarity, distinct from other memories of 2020. (2020-09-08)

Unbalanced microtubule networks launch establishment of neuronal polarity
Prof. MENG Wenxiang's group from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently reported a new mechanism by which microtubule networks instruct neuronal polarity. (2020-08-21)

A bright idea -- Genetically engineered proteins for studying neurons using light
In neuroscience, tools for controlling the activation and deactivation of individual nerve cells are crucial to gain insights into their functions and characteristics. Now, scientists from Okayama University, Japan, have produced mutant variants of a membrane protein that can effectively silence neurons when illuminated. The silencing effect can be quickly ''toggled'' on and off using green and red light sequentially, providing a more sophisticated tool than those currently available. (2020-08-18)

Using personal frequency to control brain activity
Individual frequency can be used to specifically influence certain areas of the brain and thus the abilities processed in them - solely by electrical stimulation on the scalp, without any surgical intervention. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have now demonstrated this for the first time. (2020-08-17)

How thoughts could one day control electronic prostheses, wirelessly
The current generation of neural implants record enormous amounts of neural activity, then transmit these brain signals through wires to a computer. But, so far, when researchers have tried to create wireless brain-computer interfaces to do this, it took so much power to transmit the data that the implants generated too much heat to be safe for the patient. A new study suggests how to solve his problem -- and thus cut the wires. (2020-08-04)

Genetic malfunction of brain astrocytes triggers migraine
Neuroscientists of the University of Zurich shed a new light on the mechanisms responsible for familial migraine: They show that a genetic dysfunction in specific brain cells of the cingulate cortex area strongly influences head pain occurrence. (2020-06-24)

Synaptic variability provides adaptability for rhythmic motor pattern
From snail to man, one of the most common features in behavior is arguably the variability of motor acts--for example, a soccer player evading an opponent. By studying how the marine snail Aplysia produces variable feeding behavior, researchers have found that variable motor outputs stem from a complex interplay of synaptic variability and the strengths of the synaptic contacts between specific neuronal elements in a feedforward motor network. (2020-06-19)

Will lockdown loneliness make us loners?
Over the past months at least half of the world's population has been affected by some form of lockdown due to COVID-19. Many are experiencing the impact of social isolation. Loneliness affects both mental and physical health, but counterintuitively it can also result in a decreased desire for social interaction. To understand the mechanics of this paradox, UCL researchers based at the Wolfson Institute and the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre investigated social behaviour in zebrafish. (2020-06-10)

Sainsbury Wellcome Center researchers find mouse and human eye movements share important similarity
In a study published today in Current Biology, Arne Meyer, John O'Keefe and Jasper Poort used a lightweight eye-tracking system composed of miniature video cameras and motion sensors to record head and eye movements in mice without restricting movement or behavior. Measurements were made while the animals performed naturalistic visual behaviors including social interactions with other mice and visual object tracking. (2020-05-14)

Origins of human language pathway in the brain at least 25 million years old
The human language pathway in the brain has been identified by scientists as being at least 25 million years old -- 20 million years older than previously thought. (2020-04-20)

How expectations influence learning
During learning, the brain is a prediction engine that continually makes theories about our environment and accurately registers whether an assumption is true or not. A team of neuroscientists from Bochum has shown that expectation during these predictions affects the activity of various brain networks. They report on the results in two articles that were published in March and April 2020 in the journals Cerebral Cortex and Journal of Neuroscience. (2020-04-15)

Scientists show how parasitic infection causes seizures, psychiatric illness for some
In a new study published in GLIA , Virginia Tech neuroscientists at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC describe how the common Toxoplasma gondii parasite prompts the loss of inhibitory signaling in the brain by altering the behavior of nearby cells called microglia. (2020-04-02)

How dopamine drives brain activity
Using a specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensor that can track dopamine levels, MIT neuroscientists have discovered how dopamine released deep within the brain influences distant brain regions. (2020-04-01)

Scientists can see the bias in your brain
The strength of alpha brain waves reveals if you are about to make a biased decision, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-03-16)

Why monkeys choose to drink alone
Why do some people almost always drop $10 in the Salvation Army bucket and others routinely walk by? One answer may be found in an intricate and rhythmic neuronal dance between two specific brain regions, finds a new Yale University study published Feb. 24, 2020 in the journal Nature Neuroscience. (2020-02-24)

New method gives glaucoma researchers control over eye pressure
Neuroscientists have developed a new method that permits continuous regulation of eye pressure without damage, becoming the first to definitively prove pressure in the eye is sufficient to cause and explain glaucoma. (2020-02-24)

Casting light on the brain's inner workings
A team of engineers from University of Arizona, George Washington University and Northwestern University have created an ultra-small, wireless, battery-free device that uses light to record individual neurons so neuroscientists can see how the brain is working. (2020-02-10)

Brain pressure controls eye pressure, revealing new avenues for glaucoma treatment
Neuroscientists have discovered that eye and brain pressure are physiologically connected. (2020-01-13)

Oregon researchers test hearing by looking at dilation of people's eyes
University of Oregon neuroscientists have shown that a person's hearing can be assessed by measuring dilation of the pupils in eyes, a method that is as sensitive as traditional methods of testing hearing. (2020-01-08)

Understanding the adolescent brain
New research from University of Alberta neuroscientists shows that the brains of adolescents struggling with mental-health issues may be wired differently from those of their healthy peers. (2019-12-20)

New methods could help researchers watch neurons compute
A pair of advances in brain imaging technology will help neuroscientists track electrical activity in neurons with a new level of clarity. (2019-12-13)

Scientists develop first implantable magnet resonance detector
A new miniature NMR implant measures neuronal activity. (2019-11-27)

Approaching the perception of touch in the brain
More than ten percent of the cerebral cortex are involved in processing information about our sense of touch -- a larger area than previously thought. This is the result of a joint study by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and Ruhr Universit├Ąt Bochum. (2019-11-25)

Scientists identify circuit responsible for building memories during sleep
Neuroscientists at the University of Alberta have identified a mechanism that may help build memories during deep sleep, according to a new study. (2019-11-05)

New method visualizes groups of neurons as they compute
Using a fluorescent probe that lights up when brain cells are electrically active, MIT and Boston University researchers found they can image the activity of many neurons at once, in mice brains. The technique could allow neuroscientists to analyze circuits within the brain and link them to specific behaviors. (2019-10-09)

Diabetes-Alzheimer's link explored at Neuroscience 2019
Surprising links exist between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, and researchers are beginning to unpack the pathology that connects the two. Hear leading scientists announce their new findings at Neuroscience 2019, the world's largest source of emerging news and cutting-edge research on the brain and nervous system. (2019-10-07)

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