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Current Neuroscientists News and Events, Neuroscientists News Articles.
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Organoid research revealed at Neuroscience 2019
Mini-brains, also called organoids, may offer breakthroughs in clinical research by allowing scientists to study human brain cells without a human subject. Hear leading scientists announce their new findings at Neuroscience 2019, the world's largest source of emerging news and cutting-edge research on the brain and nervous system. (2019-09-30)

Researchers fail to replicate influential neuroimaging genetics study
Neuroscientists have failed to replicate the findings of an influential study linking genetics to cognition. Published in JNeurosci, the researchers highlight issues in the design, analysis, and interpretation of the original study. (2019-09-30)

Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?
Neuroscientists (UNIGE) analysed how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant. Their results showed that the conventional sound-processing circuit is activated but that the cortical and sub-cortical areas involved in the processing of salience and aversion are also solicited. This explains why the brain goes into a state of alert on hearing this type of sound. (2019-09-20)

Study finds hub linking movement and motivation in the brain
Detailed observations in the lateral septum indicate that the well-connected region processes movement, and reward information to help direct behavior. (2019-09-19)

Brain: How to optimize decision making?
Our brains are constantly faced with different choices. Why is it so difficult to make up our mind when faced with two or more choices? Neuroscientists (UNIGE) developed a mathematical model of the optimal choice strategy. They demonstrated that optimal decisions must be based not on the true value of the possible choices but on the difference in value between them. (2019-09-11)

How our brain filters sounds
When two identical sounds are repeated quickly, a filter reduces the attention that the brain directs to the second sound it hears. In people with schizophrenia, this ability to reduce the brain's response to identical sounds does not function properly. But the question is: Why? Neuroscientists (UNIGE) have been investigating the mechanism that lies behind this auditory sensory gating. Their results show that the filtering begins at the very beginning of the auditory stimuli processing. (2019-09-06)

Brain stem cells have a good memory
During embryogenesis, dozens of types of neurons with distinct functions come together to form the circuits that drive our thoughts and actions. They are generated by progenitor cells, which produce them one after the other in a very precise order. Researchers at the University of Geneva now provide proof that progenitor cells are transplanted into a young mouse embryo, they recover their past skills and rejuvenate. (2019-08-28)

New method classifies brain cells based on electrical signals
A team of neuroscientists at the University of Tuebingen and MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory shows how to distinguish four classes of brain cells by their spike waveforms. The advance offers brain researchers the chance to better understand how different kinds of neurons are contributing to behavior, perception and memory, and how they are malfunctioning in cases of psychiatric or neurological diseases. (2019-08-22)

Manipulating brain cells by smartphone
Researchers have developed a soft neural implant that can be wirelessly controlled using a smartphone. It is the first wireless neural device capable of indefinitely delivering multiple drugs and multiple colour lights, which neuroscientists believe can speed up efforts to uncover brain diseases (2019-08-06)

Scientists can now manipulate brain cells using smartphone
A team of scientists in Korea and the United States have invented a device that can control neural circuits using a tiny brain implant controlled by a smartphone. The device could speed up efforts to uncover brain diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, addiction, depression, and pain. (2019-08-05)

What the brains of people with excellent general knowledge look like
The brains of people with excellent general knowledge are particularly efficiently wired. This was shown by neuroscientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin using magnetic resonance imaging. (2019-07-31)

Brown neuroscientists discover neuron type that acts as brain's metronome
By measuring the fast electrical spikes of individual neurons in the touch region of the brain, Brown University neuroscientists have discovered a new type of cell that keeps time so regularly that it may serve as the brain's long-hypothesized clock or metronome. (2019-07-18)

Area of brain linked to spatial awareness and planning also plays role in decision making
New research by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago shows that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), an area of the brain often associated with planning movements and spatial awareness, also plays a crucial role in making decisions about images in the field of view. (2019-07-11)

Study reveals a short bout of exercise enhances brain function
Neuroscientists at Oregon Health & Science University, working with mice, have discovered that a short burst of exercise directly boosts the function of a gene that increases connections between neurons in the hippocampus, the region of the brain associated with learning and memory. (2019-07-02)

Structural development of the brain
In a recent study published in The Journal of Neuroscience, researchers reveal how the basic structure of the brain is formed. (2019-06-21)

Rhythmic control of 'brain waves' can boost memory -- study
Controlling the frequency of 'brain waves' could help to improve people's recall of memories and potentially provide a key to unlock conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, according to a new article. (2019-06-06)

Neurons' 'antennae' are unexpectedly active in neural computation
Dendrites, the branching extensions of most brain cells, appear to play a surprisingly large role in neurons' computational ability, according to a new MIT study. (2019-06-06)

Are hormones a 'female problem' for animal research?
Women, but not men, are often still described as 'hormonal' or 'emotional,' an outdated stereotype that poses a critical problem for public health, writes Rebecca Shansky in this Perspective. (2019-05-30)

How a zebrafish could help solve the mysteries of genetic brain disease
A close look at the rapidly developing zebrafish embryo is helping neuroscientists better understand the potential underpinnings of brain disorders, including autism and schizophrenia. The new study, published online this month in the journal eNeuro, points to a 'clustering' of cellular interactions in the brain that may disrupt normal development and brain health. (2019-05-23)

Flexibility of working memory from random connections
Working memory is your ability to hold things 'in mind.' It acts as a workspace in which information can be held, manipulated, and used to guide behavior. It plays a critical role in cognition, decoupling behavior from the immediate sensory world. One remarkable thing about working memory is its flexibility -- you can hold anything in mind. In their new manuscript, Bouchacourt and Buschman present the first model of working memory that captures this flexibility. (2019-05-16)

Dataset bridges human vision and machine learning
Neuroscientists and computer vision scientists at Carnegie Mellon University and Fordham University say a new dataset of unprecedented size -- comprising brain scans of four volunteers who each viewed 5,000 images -- will help researchers better understand how the brain processes images. (2019-05-06)

Controlling primate neural activity using artwork from artificial neural networks
By showing macaques images generated by an artificial neural network, researchers were able to control the activity of specific neurons within the visual systems of these animals' brains, according to a new study. (2019-05-02)

Putting vision models to the test
MIT neuroscientists have performed the most rigorous testing yet of computational models that mimic the brain's visual cortex. The results suggest that the current versions of these models are similar enough to the brain to allow them to actually control brain states in animals. (2019-05-02)

Connecting neurons in the brain
Leuven researchers uncover new mechanisms of brain development that determine when, where and how strongly distinct brain cells interconnect. The brain consists of a large collection of interconnected neurons. How complex patterns of neuronal cells grow into functioning circuits during development has fascinated researchers for decades. A team of scientists at VIB and KU Leuven has now uncovered a new signaling mechanism in fruit flies that specifies the formation of neuronal circuits in the brain. (2019-05-02)

How the olfactory brain affects memory
How sensory perception in the brain affects learning and memory processes is far from fully understood. Two neuroscientists of Ruhr-Universität Bochum have discovered a new aspect of how the processing of odours impacts memory centres. They showed that the piriform cortex -- a part of the olfactory brain -- has a direct influence on information storage in our most important memory structure, the hippocampus. (2019-04-29)

Aging gracefully: Study identifies factors for healthy memory at any age
University of Alberta neuroscientists have identified different factors for maintaining healthy memory and for avoiding memory decline in those over age 55, according to a new study. The results have implications for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease through targeted early intervention efforts. (2019-04-10)

Penn researchers discover the source of new neurons in brain hippocampus
Researchers have shown, in mice, that one type of stem cell that makes adult neurons is the source of this lifetime stock of new cells in the hippocampus. These findings may help neuroscientists figure out how to maintain youthful conditions for learning and memory, and repair and regenerate parts of the brain after injury and aging. (2019-03-28)

OU neuroscientists find brain pathway supporting an intersection of taste and pain
University of Oklahoma neuroscientists have found a pathway in the brain where taste and pain intersect in a new study that originally was designed to look at the intersection of taste and food temperature. This study was the first time researchers have shown that taste and pain signals come together in the brain and use the same circuitry. OU neuroscientists received a five-year, $1.6 million National Institutes of Health grant to study this concept. (2019-03-12)

'Broken heart' syndrome may originate in the brain
Scientists have shown for the first time that the brain is involved in the development of a heart condition called Takotsubo syndrome (TTS). They found that regions of the brain responsible for processing emotions and controlling the unconscious workings of the body, such as heart beat, breathing and digestion, do not communicate with each other as well in TTS patients as in healthy people. The study is published in the European Heart Journal. (2019-03-04)

Detailed new primate brain atlas could lead to disease insights
An international project based in Japan and co-led by CSHL Professor Partha Mitra has mapped connections in the marmoset brain at an unprecedented level of detail. A better understanding of primate neural connectivity promises to lead to fundamental therapeutic advances for human diseases. (2019-03-01)

Researchers suggest balanced reporting of sports head injuries
A group of more than 60 leading international neuroscientists, including Mark Herceg, Ph.D., a neuropsychologist at Northwell Health's Phelps Hospital in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y., and a member of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, published a correspondence today in The Lancet Neurology, asking for balance when reporting on sports-related injury chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). (2019-02-12)

Numenta publishes breakthrough theory for intelligence and cortical computation
Numenta researchers propose a broad framework for understanding what the neocortex does and how it works. 'The Thousand Brains Theory of Intelligence' proposes that every part of the neocortex learns complete models of objects and concepts, rather than learning one model of the world. (2019-01-14)

Scope advance reveals first look through all cortical layers of awake brain
Improvements in three-photon microscopy made by scientists at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory have allowed scientists to see activity in all layers of the visual cortex and the 'subplate' below. (2019-01-11)

NUS scientists harness machine learning to uncover new insights into the human brain
An inter-disciplinary research team led by the National University of Singapore has successfully employed machine learning to uncover new insights into the cellular architecture of the human brain. This approach could potentially be used to assess treatment of neurological disorders, and to develop new therapies. (2019-01-09)

Confronting the side effects of a common anti-cancer treatment
Results of a new study by neuroscientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggest that a new treatment approach is needed -- and how this may be possible -- to address adverse effects of aromatase inhibitors, drugs commonly prescribed to both men and women to prevent recurrence of estrogen-positive breast cancer. (2018-12-26)

Toward brain-like computing: New memristor better mimics synapses
A new electronic device can developed at the University of Michigan can directly model the behaviors of a synapse, which is a connection between two neurons. (2018-12-17)

Resting easy: Oxygen promotes deep, restorative sleep, study shows
Exposure to high levels of oxygen encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep, according to a new study by University of Alberta neuroscientists. (2018-12-12)

Researchers alleviate Schizophrenia symptoms in new mouse models
In a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Lin Mei, MD, PhD, asked, does all the tinkering in young mice hamper their brain development, causing schizophrenia-like symptoms? Or, do their brain cells develop normally, but in adulthood struggle to communicate? Researchers need to know whether to focus their efforts on brain cell development or communication, or both, because the answer to these questions implies different therapeutic approaches. (2018-11-30)

Scripps Research scientists decode mechanism of remembering -- and forgetting
A team at Scripps Research has shown for the first time the physiological mechanism by which a memory is formed and then subsequently forgotten. The research, which was done in fruit flies, looked at the synaptic changes that occur during learning and forgetting. The investigators found that a single dopamine neuron can drive both the learning and forgetting process. (2018-11-27)

Snails become risk-takers when hungry
Research from the University of Sussex proves that snails take more risks when hungry, risking potentially harmful substances in order to survive. (2018-11-21)

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