Current Neurosurgery News and Events | Page 3

Current Neurosurgery News and Events, Neurosurgery News Articles.
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Using graphene to detect ALS, other neurodegenerative diseases
Graphene can determine whether cerebrospinal fluid comes from a person with ALS, MS or from someone without a neurodegenerative disease. (2018-12-05)

'Error Neurons' play role in how brain processes mistakes
New research from Cedars-Sinai has identified neurons that play a role in how people recognize errors they make, a discovery that may have implications for the treatment of conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. The study also offers a new level of understanding for error-related negativity, which can be easily measured using an EEG and could one day become standard clinical care in individuals with psychiatric disorders. (2018-12-04)

Fluorescent marker can help guide surgeons to remove dangerous brain tumor cells more accurately
A chemical that highlights tumor cells has been used by surgeons to help spot and safely remove brain cancer in a trial presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference. (2018-11-03)

Pseudarthrosis following single-level ACDF is five times more likely when a PEEK interbody device is used
Researchers found pseudarthrosis (lack of new bone regrowth) to be five times more likely after a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody spacer device had been used to bridge the gap between vertebrae during cervical spine surgery than after a structural (bone) allograft had been used. (2018-10-30)

Surgery technique reduces strokes in atherosclerosis patients
A surgical technique called EDAS (encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis) significantly decreases the rate of stroke recurrence and death for patients with severe atherosclerosis of the brain arteries, according to findings of a Phase IIa clinical trial presented today at the World Stroke Congress in Montreal. (2018-10-18)

Holographic images increase accuracy of external ventricular drain insertion
Researchers from Beijing have developed a new technique of external ventricular drain (EVD) insertion that involves the use of a mixed-reality holographic computer headset. Wearing this headset, the neurosurgeon can visualize holographic images of individual patients' brain structures while performing the procedure. This makes EVD insertion more accurate than the usual freehand technique, which relies only on referral to external anatomical landmarks. (2018-10-16)

Brain cancer survival has improved -- but not much for elderly
A new study from Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki and the Finnish Cancer Registry shows that survival after glioblastoma has improved since the millennium. The improvement in survival was, however, modest in elderly patients, raising concerns whether current treatment strategies are optimal for this patient group. (2018-10-16)

Sample size matters in multisensory integration studies
Sample size (the number of individuals examined for a study) is the most important factor determining the accuracy of the study results. (2018-09-20)

Blood and brain fluid change first in Huntington's disease
A simple blood test can detect the earliest changes caused by Huntington's disease, even before scans can pick up any signs in the brain, a new UCL-led study has found. (2018-09-12)

Improving operations for the brain's most malignant tumor
Important research by Barrow Neurological Institute neurosurgeons and University of Washington (UW) scientists on novel imaging technology for malignant brain tumors was published in the August issue of the Nature journal, Scientific Reports. (2018-08-31)

Stem cells show promise as drug delivery tool for childhood brain cancer
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers showed they could shrink tumors in laboratory models of medulloblastoma, and extend life. The study, published in PLOS ONE, is a necessary step toward developing clinical trials that would see if the approach works for children. (2018-08-29)

Qual­ity re­gisters for sur­gery ex­clude many treat­ment-re­lated ad­verse events
According to a recent study, many extensive national registries are primarily based on data collected for administrative purposes, and often feature selective and incomplete reporting of treatment outcomes. (2018-08-28)

Heart-brain connection could be predictive biomarker for epilepsy
Heartbeat irregularities connected to brain activity abnormalities may lead to the ability to predict eventual epileptic seizures in subjects who suffered physical or infectious brain insults, according to Penn State researchers who studied mouse models of cerebral malaria, which often causes epilepsy in those who survive. (2018-08-27)

Automated detection of focal epileptic seizures in a sentinel area of the human brain
In a first-in-humans pilot study, researchers have identified a sentinel area of the brain that may give an early warning before clinical seizure manifestations from focal epilepsy appear. They have also validated an algorithm that can automatically detect that early warning. These two findings offer the possibility of squelching a focal epilepsy seizure -- before the patient feels any symptoms -- through neurostimulation of the sentinel area of the brain. (2018-08-17)

Artificial intelligence platform screens for acute neurological illnesses at Mount Sinai
An artificial intelligence platform designed to identify a broad range of acute neurological illnesses, such as stroke, hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus, was shown to identify disease in CT scans in 1.2 seconds, faster than human diagnosis. (2018-08-13)

Research brief: New 3D-printed device could help treat spinal cord injuries
Engineers and medical researchers at the University of Minnesota have teamed up to create a groundbreaking 3D-printed device that could someday help patients with long-term spinal cord injuries regain some function. (2018-08-09)

Traumatic brain injury biomarker shows promise to support rapid damage evaluation and predict outcomes
A new study in The American Journal of Pathology found that a brain lipid molecule, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), was significantly increased after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a preclinical animal model. They also found that it was elevated in areas associated with cell death and axonal injury, both major hallmarks of moderate and severe TBI. This strengthens the evidence that LPA could be used as a biomarker of TBI through blood testing, potentially providing a prognostic indicator of injury and outcome. (2018-07-16)

Increased brain injury markers in response to asymptomatic high-accelerated head impacts
Researchers from the University of Michigan found that serum levels of two biomarkers of traumatic brain injury, tau and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1, are elevated following high-acceleration head impacts, even when there is no clinical diagnosis of concussion. (2018-07-03)

Your brain with a migraine
When migraine sufferers see the tell-tale squiggly lines, light flashes and blind spots of a migraine aura, they prepare for a migraine. When researchers see the brain image of an aura, they try to figure out what causes it and if there is a way to stop the start of the migraine. Now an international team of researchers has identified the electrical activity specific to the start of migraines and demonstrated a way to stop it in animal experiments. (2018-06-27)

Spine surgery patients less likely to be opioid dependent after surgery
Spine surgeons and researchers at UofL, concerned about potential opioid misuse resulting from pain management related to surgery, have discovered positive news in a study of back surgery patients. The study, conducted by researchers in the UofL Department of Neurological Surgery, concludes that patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis are less likely to be dependent on opioids after than before the surgery. (2018-06-26)

World's first intra-operative MRI-guided robot for bilateral stereotactic neurosurgery
A HKU Mechanical Engineering team led by Dr. Kwok Ka-wai recently designed the first neurosurgical robotic system capable of performing bilateral stereotactic neurosurgery inside a magnetic resonance imaging ('MRI') scanner. The team also conducted pre-clinical validation of the system with CUHK neurosurgeons, Dr Danny Chan Tat-ming and Professor Poon Wai-sang. This innovative technological breakthrough can facilitate the treatment of Parkinson's disease and other neuropsychiatric disorders. (2018-06-19)

Holes in the head
UM neurorehabilitation expert Dr. David S. Kushner, who helps modern patients recover from brain surgery, chronicles the remarkable skill of ancient Peru's cranial surgeons. (2018-06-08)

Personalized cancer vaccine may increase long-term survival in patients with deadly brain cancer
An international Phase III study led by researchers at UCLA has found that a personalized GBM vaccine may increase long-term survival in some patients. (2018-06-04)

Assessment of biomarkers of subconcussive head trauma
Researchers evaluated the usefulness of biomarker testing in determining the potential extent of brain trauma suffered from repetitive subconcussive head impacts sustained over the course of a college football season. (2018-05-29)

New advances in understanding and treating intellectual disorder
Researchers at Tohoku University in Japan have investigated an intellectual disorder (ATR-X) syndrome to reveal its cause, mechanism and a potential therapeutic strategy to decrease associated cognitive impairment. (2018-05-23)

Robotically controlled digital microscope provides new visualization system in operating room
The Department of Neurosurgery at the Mount Sinai Health System is one of the first hospitals in the country to use Modus V™, a hands-free, robotically controlled digital microscope that provides advanced visualization in the operating room. (2018-05-23)

Michael Jackson's antigravity tilt -- Talent, magic, or a bit of both?
Three neurosurgeons from the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research in Chandigarh, India, set out to examine Michael Jackson's antigravity tilt, introduced in the movie video 'Smooth Criminal,' from a neurosurgeon's point of view. (2018-05-22)

Operating on brain gliomas by detecting the 'glow'
Research by Barrow Neurological Institute physicians and University of Washington scientists on novel imaging technology for malignant brain tumors was published in the April issue of World Neurosurgery. (2018-05-09)

Prolonged exposure to air pollution leads to genetic changes in rat brains, study finds
Prolonged exposure to particulate matter in air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin triggered inflammation and the appearance of cancer-related genes in the brains of rats, a Cedars-Sinai study has found. (2018-05-08)

Study sheds light on how 'dopamine neurons' contribute to memory formation in humans
Research from Cedars-Sinai sheds light on how the human brain rapidly forms new memories, providing insights into potential new treatments for memory disorders. A new study examined neurons that produce dopamine, a compound that acts as a transmitter for nerve impulses. It found that these dopamine neurons play a critical role in the formation of episodic memory, which allows people to remember such things as where they parked the car in the morning and what they had for dinner last night. (2018-05-02)

Lightning carries potential danger to people with deep brain stimulators
Patients receiving deep brain stimulation are warned that their neurostimulators may dysfunction when confronted by electromagnetic fields generated by particular electrical devices found at work, home, and in the hospital. A new and potentially dangerous source of dysfunction has been identified: nearby lightening. (2018-05-01)

Acute and chronic changes in myelin following mild traumatic brain injury
Preliminary research using mcDESPOT magnetic resonance imaging shows changes in the myelin content of white matter in the brain following mild traumatic brain injury. Myelin changes are apparent at the time of injury and three months afterward. (2018-05-01)

New imaging system makes back surgery safer, faster and less expensive
Dartmouth College researchers develop a new way to make back surgery safer, faster and more cost effective. Professors from Thayer School of Engineering and Geisel School of Medicine develop and test a 3-dimensional, real-time optical tracking system, like a 'Google Maps' for the body. (2018-04-26)

Noninvasive brain tumor biopsy on the horizon
Taking a biopsy of a brain tumor is a complicated and invasive surgical process, but a team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis is developing a way that allows them to detect tumor biomarkers through a simple blood test. (2018-04-26)

Simple one-page tool improves patient satisfaction with doctor visit
A simple, one-page form given to patients ahead of their doctor visit can significantly improve satisfaction with the care they receive, according to a study by Duke Health researchers. (2018-04-17)

New Glasgow Coma Scale-pupils score and multifactor probability outcome charts
The University of Glasgow's Sir Graham Teasdale, co-creator of the Glasgow Coma Scale, has teamed with Paul M. Brennan and Gordon D. Murray of the University of Edinburgh to create new assessment tools that build on the Glasgow Coma Scale to provide greater information on injury severity and prognosis in patients with traumatic brain injury while still offering simplicity of use. (2018-04-10)

New method lets doctors quickly assess severity of brain injuries
A new way to rapidly assess levels of consciousness in people with head injuries could improve patient care. (2018-04-10)

Newly discovered biomarkers could be key to predicting severity of brain tumor recurrence
Researchers have identified predictive biomarkers that could help assess the level of risk for recurrence in patients with malignant glioma. The study, led by Henry Ford Health System, was published today in Cell Reports. In an analysis of 200 tumor samples, the authors identified a set of epigenetic biomarkers that can predict, at a patient's initial diagnosis, which tumors are likely to recur with a more aggressive tumor type. (2018-04-10)

Researchers advise the use of anaesthesia in foetuses from 21 weeks of gestation
From the second trimester of pregnancy, the future baby already shows signs of pain when given a harmful stimulus or as a response to stress. In response to this confirmation, the researchers indicate the need to anaesthetise the foetus during open foetal surgery, OFS. (2018-03-16)

Smartphone-assisted neuroendoscopy
A variety of neurosurgical procedures are performed with the aid of smartphone-endoscope integration. The smartphone takes the place of a camera and video monitor. It is easy to use, more cost effective, and provides the surgeon with a more intuitive and fluid method of performing neuroendoscopy. (2018-03-13)

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