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Current Neutrophils News and Events, Neutrophils News Articles.
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To understand COVID-19, researchers review aging, immune response to viral infections
As clinicians learn about a new disease in real-time, researchers are also investigating what lessons from other respiratory infections could apply to COVID-19. (2020-06-09)

Disrupted sleep increases the risk of cardiovascular disease by promoting inflammation
Sleep disruption has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis, but the mechanism has been unclear. A new study in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Raphael Vallat, Vyoma Shah, and Matthew Walker of the University of California at Berkeley and colleagues reveals that fragmented sleep exacerbates atherosclerosis and may raise the risk of stroke via an effect on inflammatory pathways. (2020-06-04)

A better model for neutrophil-related diseases
Neutrophils are critical immune cells for antimicrobial defense, but they can exacerbate a number of diseases, perhaps including COVID-19. The traditional approaches to study neutrophils in animal models are limited in specificity and effectiveness. EPFL scientists have now identified the problem and have developed a new, optimized model for studying the role of neutrophils in the context of disease. (2020-06-02)

New effective treatment for inflammatory diseases found
New research conducted by the University of Liverpool and AKL Research and Development Ltd (AKLRD), published in Inflammopharmacology, highlights the potential benefits of a new drug treatment on the human body's immune response in inflammation. (2020-06-01)

Ludwig Lausanne study charts the immune landscape of multiple brain cancers
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has profiled, in a sweeping comparative analysis, the distinct immune landscapes of tumors that arise in the brain, or gliomas, and those that metastasize to the organ from the lungs, breast and skin. (2020-05-28)

Stimulating immune cleanup crew offers a possibility for treating rare disorder
Compounds that mimicked the process known as efferocytosis alleviated signs of leukocyte adhesion deficiency type-1 in an animal model, according to work led by the University of Pennsylvania's George Hajishengallis. (2020-05-26)

Why pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is so lethal
Pancreatic ductal carcinoma is a fast growing and invasive cancer, and now scientists understand the molecular dance that makes it so deadly. CSHL researchers discovered factors that allow a pancreatic cell to lose its identity, turn into an aggressive cancer cell, and recruit surrounding cells to help it invade more effectively. (2020-05-19)

Researchers unlock TB vaccine puzzle in findings that could save millions of newborns
An international research team has identified the mechanism behind one of science's most enduring mysteries: what makes the 100-year-old tuberculosis (TB) vaccine so effective at preventing newborn deaths from diseases other than TB? (2020-05-06)

Higher levels of NETs in blood associated with more severe COVID-19
New study explores the connection between levels of a type of destructive white blood cell, known as a neutrophil, with the severity of COVID-19. (2020-04-24)

Finding genetic ripple effects in a single-cell environment
Researchers report in Nature developing a molecular workflow that leverages single-cell methods to understand the molecular pathways associated with specific patient gene mutations. The study creates a new platform for researchers and clinicians to study the single-cell genomics of a variety of different diseases, which potentially could make genetic-based diagnoses in the clinic more precise and effective. (2020-04-22)

International consortium investigates overactive immune cells as cause of COVID-19 deaths
In the urgent battle to treat COVID-19 patients, a group of eleven international medical research organizations is investigating whether overactive immune cells that produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) cause the most severe cases. (2020-04-16)

A protein that helps trap bacteria may contribute to metastasis in breast cancer
The protein peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), which enables some immune cells to trap bacteria, promoted breast cancer metastasis in mice when expressed in cancer cells, according to data published in Molecular Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2020-03-19)

Cracking the code for hookworm infestation
Monash University researchers have uncovered a key way that hookworms evade the immune system - providing new hope in the search for a vaccine. (2020-02-12)

Tumor secreted ANGPTL2 facilitates recruitment of neutrophils to the lung to promote lung pre-metastatic niche formation and targeting ANGPTL2 signaling affects metastatic disease
The authors determined that tumor-derived ANGPTL2 stimulates lung epithelial cells, which is essential for primary tumor-induced neutrophil recruitment in lung and subsequent pre-metastatic niche formation. (2020-02-05)

Proteins that protect against joint inflammation identified
Endogenous proteins that play a vital part in allergies and parasitic infection can prevent the immune system from wrongly attacking the body and causing inflamed joints, a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the scientific journal PNAS reports. The researchers hope that the results will give rise to new drugs for rheumatoid arthritis. (2020-01-20)

Neutrophils are equipped with a 'disarmament' program that prevents the immune system going 'out of control'
The new finding, published in Nature Immunology, could have major implications for the understanding and treatment of disorders such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and acute inflammatory processes. (2020-01-13)

Cancer drugs could potentially treat COPD, Sheffield research finds
New research has shown the potential for clinically available cancer treatments to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (2020-01-06)

Hitting HIT: Heparin therapy
Heparin is widely used as an anticoagulant, but evokes in some patients a potentially life-threatening condition called HIT. Clinical scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown that inhibition of a single enzyme may markedly reduce this risk. (2019-12-20)

Scientists link common immune cell to failure of checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer
For many lung cancer patients, the best treatment options involve checkpoint inhibitors, but the drugs only help a small subset of patients. A new study links the most abundant white blood cell to failure of checkpoint inhibitors. (2019-12-19)

Machine learning helps scientists measure important inflammation process
Inflammation is a hallmark of many health conditions, but quantifying how the underlying biology of inflammation contributes to specific diseases has been difficult. For the first time, UNC School of Medicine researchers and colleagues now report the development of a new technology to identify white blood cells called neutrophils that are primed to eject inflammatory DNA into the circulation via a process called NETosis. (2019-12-04)

Linking wound healing and cancer risk
When our skin is damaged, a whole set of biological processes springs into action to heal the wound. Now, researchers from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research have shown that one of the molecules involved in this, HMGB1, slows down wound healing. It is, however, also essential for tumor formation at sites of previous injury. The researchers found that HMGB1 controls the actions of neutrophils, a specific type of immune cells, in skin wounds and that this is crucial for cancer initiation. (2019-11-26)

Researchers discover how lungs cells respond to bacteria
Researchers have discovered that TRM cells tell surrounding lung cells to send out a signal to recruit bacteria killers called neutrophils. These finding show that immunity within the lung tissue is what provides the most protection for preventing pneumonia. (2019-11-21)

Study points to new weapon in fight against lethal fungi
Researchers at Australia's Monash University have gained insights into how nanoparticles could develop a biosensor to prevent deadly diseases contracted on medical equipment, such as catheters. (2019-11-09)

New technology promises improved treatment of inflammatory diseases
A study led by researchers at Washington State University has uncovered a potential new treatment approach for diseases associated with inflammation, including sepsis and stroke. Their paper describes a novel technology that uses nanosized particles to transport cell-killing drugs directly to activated neutrophils, the cells that drive the exaggerated immune response involved in inflammatory diseases. They also demonstrated the technology's feasibility at killing activated neutrophils without harming other cell types or compromising the immune system. (2019-11-06)

Immune cells in skin kill MRSA bacteria before they enter the body
A type of immune cell called neutrophils could be responsible for controlling bacterial numbers of an antibiotic-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on human skin before the bacteria get a chance to invade, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet published in Cell Reports. The results could provide an explanation for why this superbug is only carried transiently by some people. (2019-10-29)

Promising therapy for common form of eczema identified in early-stage trial
A therapy that targets the immune system showed promise for treating atopic dermatitis -- the most common form of eczema -- in a small proof-of-concept trial, led by scientists from the Medical Research Council Human Immunology Unit at the University of Oxford. (2019-10-23)

Immune reaction causes malaria organ damage
Immune cells can be the body's defenders and foes at the same time (2019-10-21)

How do ketogenic diets affect skin inflammation?
Not all fats are equal in how they affect our skin, according to a new study in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier. The investigators found that different ketogenic diets impacted skin inflammation differently in psoriasiform-like skin inflammation in mice. Ketogenic diets heavy in medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) such as coconut, especially in combination with omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil and plant sources like nuts and seeds, exacerbated psoriasis. (2019-10-17)

Common denominator that triggers asthma in favorable environments
Some so-called pro-allergic environments strongly promote the development of asthma and are responsible for the dramatic increase in the prevalence of asthma, especially in industrialized countries. Researchers at the GIGA of the University of Liège have identified how all these pro-allergic environments act in the same way on the pulmonary immune system to induce the development of allergic asthma. (2019-10-07)

A mouse or an elephant: what species fights infection more effectively?
Hamilton College Assistant Professor of Biology Cynthia Downs led a study with co-authors from North Dakota State University, University of California, Davis, Eckerd College, and University of South Florida that investigated whether body mass was related to concentrations of two important immune cell types in the blood among hundreds of species of mammals ranging from tiny Jamaican fruit bats (~40 g) to giant killer whales (~5,600 kg). (2019-09-25)

Diverse immune cell profiles and roles found in breast cancer resistance to immunotherapy
Researchers show that heterogeneity of both breast cancer cells themselves and immune composition of the tumor microenvironment are important considerations for therapy. (2019-08-26)

Immune cells drive gallstone formation
Sticky meshworks of DNA and proteins extruded by white blood cells called neutrophils act as the glue that binds together calcium and cholesterol crystals during gallstone formation, researchers in Germany report Aug. 15, 2019 in the journal Immunity. Both genetic and pharmacological approaches that inhibited the formation of these so-called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) reduced the formation and growth of gallstones in mice. (2019-08-15)

New study helps to understand human defence mechanisms and spread of cancer
With the help of new technology, the researchers of the University of Turku in Finland have gained more detailed information on the diversity of the human lymphatic system than before. The research results can help to understand the human defence mechanisms on the molecular level even better than before. Several cancers, such as breast cancer and head and neck cancers, spread primarily via the lymphatic system. (2019-08-13)

Nanosecond pulsed electric fields activate immune cells
Nanosecond pulsed electric fields are strong electrical pulses over a very short period of time (nanoseconds) that results in high electrical power. They are used in many fields and now researchers in Japan have found that stimulating immune cells with nanosecond pulsed electric fields can cause the cells to respond as if they were being stimulated by bacteria. (2019-08-07)

Sperm may offer the uterus a 'secret handshake'
Why does it take 200 million sperm to fertilize a single egg? Part of the reason is bombardment by the female immune system, which very few sperm survive. Researchers have discovered a molecular handshake between sperm and uterine cells that may help sperm evade this attack --or may help the immune system target the weakest sperm. (2019-07-18)

Megakaryocytes act as 'bouncers' restraining cell migration in the bone marrow
Scientists at the University Würzburg and University Hospital of Würzburg found that megakaryocytes act as 'bouncers' and thus modulate bone marrow niche properties and cell migration dynamics. The study was published in July in the journal Haematologica. (2019-07-17)

In cases when patients under anesthesia experience anaphylaxis, hyperactive immune...
A study of 86 patients reveals how drugs used for anesthesia can induce life-threatening anaphylaxis (a dangerous type of allergic reaction) through an alternative immune pathway. (2019-07-10)

Anaphylactic shock: IgG antibodies and neutrophils play an unexpected role
Teams from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm, the Paris Public Hospital Network (AP-HP), the CNRS, Paris-Sud University and Sorbonne University have successfully identified a new pathological mechanism responsible for the unexplained cases of anaphylactic shock, involving neutrophils activated by antibodies of the IgG class. These findings, published on July 10, 2019 in the journal Science Translational Medicine, will help improve diagnosis and treatment for patients with this type of shock. (2019-07-10)

A mechanism that makes infants more likely than adults to die from sepsis is discovered
Scientists at the Center for Research on Inflammatory Diseases (CRID) show why pediatric patients with sepsis suffer from more inflammation and organ injury than adults. New treatment strategies may be tested. (2019-07-03)

Gene activity database could spare thousands of mice
A comprehensive database of gene activity in mice across ten disease models, which could significantly reduce animal use worldwide, has been developed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, which gives a full picture of the immune response to different pathogens. (2019-06-28)

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