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Current Neutrophils News and Events, Neutrophils News Articles.
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New method divides patients with ulcerative colitis in groups
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a way of using gene expression conserved across species to divide patients with the inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis into two distinct groups. The findings are published in the journal Nature Communications, and the researchers hope that the method can also be used to subdivide other autoimmune diseases. (2019-06-28)

Scientists reminded immune cells on what side they should be
International group of scientists in the joint study of the laboratory of the Wistar Institute, University of Pittsburgh and I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University discovered that during the cancer development immune cells called neutrophils begin to prevent other immune cells from fighting tumor and decelerate treatment. The scientists demonstrated that suppressing the activity of protein causing such changes allows to delay cancer development. The research details are published in Nature. (2019-06-07)

Bid to beat superbugs boosted by immune defence discovery
The fight against superbugs could be helped by the discovery of a potential therapy based on the body's natural immune defences. (2019-06-03)

Immune system discovery inspires a new barometer for inflammatory diseases
A unique discovery about the nature of neutrophils -- the most numerous white blood cells in the body -- may lead to new models for diagnosing and tracking inflammatory diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. (2019-05-29)

Deletion in mouse neutrophils offers clues to pathogenesis in multiple sclerosis
A mouse model called experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, or EAE, is used to discover disease mechanisms that may translate into treatments for patients with multiple sclerosis. Researchers now report in the journal JCI Insight how dysregulated neutrophils cause damage in a severe, mouse model form of EAE called atypical EAE, which attacks cerebellum brain tissue. (2019-05-24)

KAIST identifies the cause of sepsis-induced lung injury
A KAIST research team succeeded in visualizing pulmonary microcirculation and circulating cells in vivo with a custom-built 3D intravital lung microscopic imaging system. They found a type of leukocyte called neutrophils aggregate inside the capillaries during sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI), leading to disturbances and dead space in blood microcirculation. According to the researchers, this phenomenon is responsible for tissue hypoxia causing lung damage in the sepsis model, and mitigating neutrophils improves microcirculation as well as hypoxia. (2019-05-07)

New treatment for severe dry eye disease promising in early clinical trials
Participants in a phase I/II clinical trial of a new enzyme-based treatment for severe dry eye disease experienced reduced signs of disease and discomfort, according to a paper in Translational Vision Science and Technology. (2019-05-07)

Atherosclerosis: Induced cell death destabilizes plaques
Many chronic disorders arise from misdirected immune responses. A Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team led by Oliver Söhnlein now shows that neutrophils exacerbate atherosclerosis by inducing smooth muscle-cell death and that a tailored peptide inhibits the process. (2019-05-01)

Impeding white blood cells in antiphospholipid syndrome reduced blood clots
A new study examined APS at the cellular level and found that two drugs reduced development of blood clots in mice affected with the condition. (2019-04-25)

Longer neutrophil lifespan may contribute to HIV-associated intestinal inflammation
The increased survival of white blood cells called neutrophils is associated with alterations in the intestinal microbiome of HIV-infected individuals, according to a study published April 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Nichole Klatt of the University of Miami, and colleagues. Moreover, the findings suggest that Lactobacillus bacteria, which are commonly in probiotics, may reduce neutrophil lifespan, and could be an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce intestinal inflammation in HIV-infected individuals. (2019-04-11)

New non-antibiotic strategy for the treatment of bacterial meningitis
With the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance, there is a growing need for new treatment strategies against life threatening bacterial infections. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden and the University of Copenhagen may have identified such an alternative treatment for bacterial meningitis, a serious infection that can lead to sepsis. The study is published in Nature Communications. (2019-04-10)

Single-cell sequencing reveals landscape of immune cell subtypes in lung cancer tumors
Single-cell sequencing reveals 25 subpopulations of myeloid cells, a poorly understood family of immune cells, in lung cancer tumors. Many subpopulations are similar across humans and mice, supporting the use of mouse models in immunotherapy research. Findings set stage to assess myeloid cells as targets for new or improved immunotherapies. (2019-04-09)

Mayo Clinic researchers identify potential new therapy for liver diseases
Drug therapy may effectively treat a potentially life-threatening condition associated with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers. (2019-03-22)

Winning the arms race: Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection
Researchers at Osaka University applied molecular evolutionary analysis to quantify the severity of negative selection pressures on genes encoding the pneumococcal choline-binding proteins (CBPs). They found particularly strong selective constraints on the gene cbpJ, suggesting its importance for bacterial infection. Further analyses revealed its role in bacterial evasion of host neutrophils, suggesting CbpJ's value as a target for drugs against streptococci. (2019-03-11)

High-fat diet and age alter microflora and cause inflammation in heart failure
Growing older and a high-fat diet enriched with omega 6 fatty acids are major contributors to health risks ranging from diabetes to heart failure. How these factors regulate the immune response is now described -- a calorie-dense, obesity-generating diet in aging mice disrupts the composition of the gut microbiome. This correlates with development of a system-wide nonresolving inflammation in acute heart failure, with a notable disruption of the immune cell profile, primarily the neutrophil-leukocyte ratio. (2019-03-01)

Cellular alterations increase vulnerability of obese and diabetic individuals to infection
A study published in Scientific Reports identifies changes to neutrophils that appear to explain why people suffering from obesity and type 2 diabetes are more likely to contract infectious diseases. (2019-02-26)

Surprise rheumatoid arthritis discovery points to new treatment
Researchers have identified an unexpected contributor to rheumatoid arthritis that may help explain the painful flare-ups associated with the disease. The discovery points to a potential new treatment for the autoimmune disorder and may also allow the use of a simple blood test to detect people at elevated risk for developing the condition. (2019-02-22)

Mass. General study finds how getting enough sleep reduces cardiovascular disease risk
Getting enough sleep is key to good health, and studies have shown that insufficient sleep increases the risk of serious problems, including cardiovascular disease. Now Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have discovered one way that sleep protects against the development of atherosclerosis. (2019-02-13)

Researchers closer to new Alzheimer's therapy with brain blood flow discovery
By discovering the culprit behind decreased blood flow in the brain of people with Alzheimer's, biomedical engineers at Cornell University have made possible promising new therapies for the disease. (2019-02-11)

When sequencing fails to pinpoint a rare disease
Genomics fails to diagnose up to half of patients who are tested. German scientists tackled the problem in a recent study in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. Using a new neutrophil proteome database they made genetic diagnoses for children with severe congenital neutropenia whom typical sequencing had failed. (2019-02-08)

Escort service: The role of immune cells in the formation of metastases
Tumor cells use a certain type of immune cells, the so-called neutrophils, to enhance their ability to form metastases. Scientists have deciphered the mechanisms of this collaboration and found strategies for blocking them. This is reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel in the scientific journal Nature. (2019-02-06)

Study: Understanding white blood cells' defense mechanisms could lead to better treatments
A laboratory-created microscopic network of fibers helped researchers understand how white blood cells capture and even kill bacteria, offering insight into the effectiveness of antibiotics in the future. (2019-01-31)

Scientists discover an immune 'clock' that controls infections and cardiovascular disease
CNIC researchers have demonstrated the existence of an immune 'clock' that coordinates day/night cycles through the activity of a class of leucocytes called neutrophils. (2019-01-29)

Myocarditis: Overshooting the mark
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that a protein called midkine, a member of the class of signaling molecules known as cytokines, is a key driver of inflammation in the heart muscle that can lead to heart failure in patients with myocarditis. (2019-01-28)

How Candida albicans exploits lack of oxygen to cause disease
Scientists from Umeå university have shown how the yeast Candida albicans can modulate and adapt to low oxygen levels in different body niches to cause infection and to harm the host. Studying adaption to hypoxic or anoxic niches is particularly fruitful, since it helps us to understand the pathogenicity of C. albicans and promotes the development of better therapy approaches. Details about the study can be found in a report recently published in the journal MBio, a publication of the American Society of Microbiology. (2019-01-15)

BIODS in search of better non-steroidal, non-acid antiinflammatory agents
Inflammation is defined as the response of immune system cells to damaged or injured tissues. The major symptoms of inflammation include increased blood flow, cellular influx, edema, elevated cellular metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) nitric oxide (NO) and vasodilation. (2019-01-12)

Metabolic syndrome patients need more vitamin C to break cycle of antioxidant depletion
A higher intake of vitamin C is crucial for metabolic syndrome patients trying to halt a potentially deadly cycle of antioxidant disruption and health-related problems, an Oregon State University researcher says. (2019-01-02)

A novel mechanism that regulates cellular injury by phagocytes during inflammation
Phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils contain multiple lysosomes, which possess a variety of digestive enzymes. Upon stimulation, phagocytes secrete these digestive enzymes through a process called lysosomal exocytosis to lyse external pathogens or tumor cells. A research team led by investigators at Kanazawa University identified myoferlin as a critical regulator of this process. Furthermore, they found that it plays an important role in inducing cellular injury by phagocytes during inflammation (Figure 1). (2018-12-21)

DNA 'webs' aid ovarian cancer metastasis, study reveals
Researchers from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that ovarian cancer cells spread, or metastasize, to new tissue after being caught in DNA 'webs' extruded by immune cells. The study, which will be published Dec. 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that preventing immune cells from forming these webs reduces metastasis in mice, suggesting that similar treatments could be used to limit the spread of ovarian cancer in humans. (2018-12-19)

Scientists found molecular 'switch' for allergic asthma treatment
A team of Russian scientists identified the role of the interleukin-6 molecule in the development of allergic asthma. Now it can be a new target for the treatment of this disease. The results are published in Frontiers in Immunology. (2018-12-17)

With these nanoparticles, a simple urine test could diagnose bacterial pneumonia
MIT researchers have now developed a nanoparticle-based technology that could be used distinguish between bacterial and viral forms of pneumonia. The technology could also be used to monitor whether antibiotic therapy has successfully treated the infection. (2018-11-29)

To resolve inflammation, location matters
A single protein can both restrain the initiation of inflammation and help to actively resolve it, according to new research led by George Hajishengallis of the University of Pennsylvania and Triantafyllos Chavakis of Technical University of Dresden. They found that the type of cell that secretes the protein determines which activity the protein promotes. (2018-11-19)

The dual and unknown function of the immune system
A new study led by CNIC researcher Andrés Hidalgo and published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine shows that in addition to its defense function and the associated damage to affected tissues, the immune system also plays an important role in the day-to-day function of healthy organs. The research results show that the immune cells called neutrophils help to maintain the normal function of healthy tissues (2018-10-18)

A new mechanism in the control of inflammation
Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have discovered a new inflammation control mechanism that shows how the damage caused by the immune response can be controlled. (2018-10-18)

A bad influence: the interplay between tumor cells and immune cells
Research at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) yielded new insights into the environment surrounding different types of lung tumors, and described how these complex cell ecosystems may in turn ultimately affect response to treatment. The results were published today in Immunity and featured on the print cover of the journal. (2018-10-16)

Function of neutrophils during tumor progression unraveled
Researchers at The Wistar Institute have characterized the function of neutrophils, a type of white blood cells, during early stages of tumor progression, showing that they migrate from the bone marrow to distant sites and facilitate tumor cell seeding and establishment of metastasis. Importantly, these neutrophils don't possess the immunosuppressive characteristics of polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells (PMN-MDSC). (2018-10-15)

How a sleeping cancer awakens and metastasizes
Scientists at CSHL have determined one of the ways in which cancers in remission can spring back into action. This knowledge has inspired a new treatment idea designed to prevent cancer recurrence and metastasis. (2018-09-27)

In cardiac injury, the NSAID carprofen causes dysfunction of the immune system
Attention has focused on how NSAIDs may cause dysfunction of the immune system. Researchers now have found that sub-acute pretreatment with the NSAID carprofen before experimental heart attack in mice impaired resolution of acute inflammation following cardiac injury. They focused on three aspects of the inflammation resolution axis -- cardiac function, leukocyte profiling and inflammation-resolution markers. (2018-09-20)

Neutrophil nanosponges soak up proteins that promote rheumatoid arthritis
Engineers have developed neutrophil 'nanosponges' that can safely absorb and neutralize a variety of proteins that play a role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Injections of these nanosponges effectively treated severe rheumatoid arthritis in two mouse models. Administering the nanosponges early on also prevented the disease from developing. The nanosponges are nanoparticles of biodegradable polymer coated with the cell membranes of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell. (2018-09-03)

Researchers find elusive source of most abundant immune cell
Discovery of human neutrophil progenitor opens the door for new therapeutic targets and could serve as an important biomarker for early cancer detection. (2018-08-28)

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