Current Newborn Screening News and Events

Current Newborn Screening News and Events, Newborn Screening News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Machine learning method identifies precancerous colon polyps
A machine learning algorithm helps accurately differentiate benign and premalignant colorectal polyps on CT colonography scans, according to a new study. (2021-02-23)

Genetic tool improves estimation of prostate cancer risk in diverse ethnic/racial groups
Scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine validated a more inclusive and comprehensive genetic tool, known as a polygenic hazard score (PHS), for predicting age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer. (2021-02-23)

Screening for macrocyclic peptides
Macrocyclic peptides are promising candidates for pharmaceuticals, but their screening is difficult. Scientists have now developed an easy-to-use, high-throughput screening assay for cyclic peptides with affinity to ubiquitin, a protein that helps to degrade proteins and induce cell death. The results could lead to novel drug candidates against cancer, according to the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2021-02-22)

Oncotarget: MEK is a promising target in the basal subtype of bladder cancer
''The @Oncotarget authors demonstrate that MEK inhibitors are a promising targeted therapy for the basal subtype of bladder cancer, and their data indicate that drug screening of 3D cultures provides an important resource for hypothesis generation'' (2021-02-22)

Race, income, education affect access to 3D mammography
Women of minority races and ethnicities and with less education and income have had relatively lower access to 3D mammography, a technology that can improve breast cancer detection and decrease false alarms, according to new research. (2021-02-19)

Ageism and sexism barring grandmothers from initiatives to save newborn lives in Global South
Ageism, sexism, and Western ideals of the nuclear family have excluded grandmothers from national and international policy initiatives to save newborn lives in the Global South, suggests an analysis published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2021-02-15)

Let the immune cell see the virus: Scientists discover unique way to target common virus
Scientists at Cardiff University have discovered a unique way to target a common virus that affects one in 200 newborn babies in the UK but for which there is only limited treatments available. (2021-02-15)

Lifestyle changes in pregnant women affected babies' genes
A study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden showed a connection between lifestyle intervention in pregnant women with obesity and epigenetic alterations in the baby. The study is published in the journal Diabetes. (2021-02-11)

Echocardiographic screening for rheumatic heart disease in Nepal
An international research team led by Thomas Pilgrim of the Department of Cardiology at Inselspital has published a much-noticed study on early detection of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in «JAMA cardiology». The study demonstrates that a significant reduction of RHD can be achieved in schools with systematic echocardiographic screening. (2021-02-11)

Misuse of opioid drugs during pregnancy could have lasting impact on child's development
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine now have preliminary but striking evidence that suggests that such exposure can cause long-lasting impairment in the brain's ability to process sensory information. These impairments may give rise to autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and substance use disorders during adolescence. The landmark study was recently published in Journal of Neuroscience. (2021-02-11)

Breast cancer death rates stop declining in younger women
Breast cancer death rates have stopped declining for women in the U.S. younger than age 40, ending a trend that existed from 1987 to 2010, according to a new study. Researchers expressed hope that the findings would raise awareness of breast cancer in younger women and spur research into the causes behind the change. (2021-02-09)

Auditory brainstem pathways do not develop properly without microglia
Auditory pathways in the brainstem do not fully mature without microglia clearing away extra cell connections. This crucial function occurs even when pruning by microglia is delayed, according to new research published in eNeuro. (2021-02-08)

Take-at-home tests boost colorectal cancer screening 10x for the underserved
By making it the default to send colorectal cancer screening tests to patients' homes unless they opted out via text message, screening rates increased by more than 1,000 percent (2021-02-08)

Book developed at Cincinnati Children's helps identify risks of reading difficulties
A study published in the journal Pediatrics expands validation evidence for a new screening tool that directly engages preschool-age children during clinic visits to assess their early literacy skills. The tool, which is the first of its kind, has the potential to identify reading difficulties as early as possible, target interventions and empower families to help their child at home, according to researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. (2021-02-04)

The pandemic lockdown's psychological impact on pregnant women
During the lockdown in the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain, pregnant women had higher symptoms of depression and anxiety. The finding comes from a study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, which also revealed that women with higher body mass index and lower social support were most affected. (2021-02-03)

Personalized screening to identify teens with high suicide risk
Researchers have developed a personalized system to better detect suicidal youths. (2021-02-03)

Computerized adaptive screener may help identify youth at risk for suicide
Researchers funded by NIMH have developed a computerized adaptive screener to identify youth at risk for attempting suicide. The screener, called the computerized adaptive screen for suicidal youth, consists of 11 questions on average and correctly identified 82.4% of youth who went on to attempt suicide in the three months following screening. The results suggest this screener could serve as an easy-to-use way for providers to detect youth suicide risk in emergency department settings. (2021-02-03)

Delaying colonoscopy following abnormal stool test increases risk of colorectal cancer
A new VA study finds that delays in undergoing colonoscopy following an abnormal stool test increase the risk of a colorectal cancer diagnosis and cancer-related death. The findings showed the risk of colorectal cancer-related death increased by up to 1.5 times when colonoscopy was delayed more than 19 months. (2021-02-02)

Year delay between abnormal, at-home screening and colonoscopy increases cancer risk
A new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found delayed time between abnormal stool-based screening and subsequent colonoscopy was associated with an increased risk of a cancer diagnosis and death from colorectal cancer. (2021-02-02)

U of M study shows enhanced accuracy of CMV detection method in newborn screening
Mark Schleiss, MD, pediatric infectious disease physician with the University of Minnesota Medical School and M Health Fairview, led a study that used improved techniques to show that the dried blood spot taken at birth can, in fact, find CMV infection in the newborn with almost 90% accuracy. The study was recently published in JAMA Pediatrics. (2021-02-02)

February special issue of SLAS Discovery focuses on hit discovery methodologies
The February edition of SLAS Discovery is a Special Issue on Hit Discovery Methodologies edited by Mark Wigglesworth, Ph.D., (Medicines Discovery Catapult, Stockport, EN, UK) and Peter Hodder, Ph.D. (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA). (2021-02-01)

TALENT study supports NLCST and NELSON trial results
A study presented today by researchers with the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Taiwan confirmed the effectiveness of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening in a pre-defined, never-smoker, high-risk population. The research was presented today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer 2021 World Conference on Lung Cancer. (2021-01-30)

New technique identifies important mutations behind Lynch Syndrome
A Michigan Medicine team describes a method for screening so-called genetic variants of uncertain significance in the hopes of identifying those mutations that could cause cancer. (2021-01-29)

Mammogram-based breast cancer risk model could lead to better screening guidelines
A new machine learning algorithm based on mammograms can estimate the risk of breast cancer in women more accurately than current risk models, according to a study from Adam Yala and colleagues. (2021-01-27)

New neural network enables easy screening of sleep apnoea in patients with cerebrovascular disease
A new neural network developed by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital enables an easy and accurate assessment of sleep apnoea severity in patients with cerebrovascular disease. The assessment is automated and based on a simple nocturnal pulse oximetry, making it possible to easily screen for sleep apnoea in stroke units. (2021-01-26)

Screening tool may help diagnose mental disorders in early pregnancy
A recent study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica found that questions typically asked to new mothers to screen for depression after giving birth can also help to detect depressive symptoms and other mental disorders during early pregnancy. (2021-01-21)

New study: nine out of ten US infants experience gut microbiome deficiency
A new peer-reviewed study reveals that the vast majority of US infants may be suffering from a substantial deficiency in an important bacterium key to breast milk utilization and immune system development, as well as protection against gut pathogens linked to common newborn conditions such as colic and diaper rash. The study is the largest to date to benchmark the widespread deficiency in gut bacteria among US infants, and the resulting diminished function of their gut microbiomes. (2021-01-21)

Study shows sharp decline in cancer screenings, diagnoses during the first COVID-19 surge
In one of the first studies to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer diagnoses, researchers at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center document a substantial decline in cancer and precancer diagnoses at the Northeast's largest health care system during the first peak of the pandemic because of a drop in the number of cancer screening tests performed. (2021-01-14)

New PTSD biotypes enables improved tests, sheds light on divergent treatments efficacy
Researchers from the PTSD Systems Biology Consortium identified distinct biotypes for post-traumatic stress disorder, the first of their kind for any psychological disorder. These biotypes can refine the development of screening tools and may explain the varying efficacy of PTSD treatments. PTSD diagnosis is complicated by over-reliance on self-reporting of patient symptoms, particularly underreporting signs of distress due to perceived stigma. Researchers identified two PTSD biotypes with differing genetic markers and underlying mechanisms of disease. (2021-01-14)

New research in JNCCN highlights dangerous disparities for life-saving cancer screening
New research in the January 2021 issue of JNCCN--Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds more than a third of eligible people miss timely screening tests for colorectal cancer and at least a quarter appear to miss timely screening tests for breast and cervical cancers. (2021-01-13)

Inpatient mammograms can reduce disparities in breast cancer screening rates
Inpatient mammograms are a feasible approach to deliver preventive care to hospitalized women who may face significant barriers to completing the test in the outpatient setting. (2021-01-13)

Levels of stress hormone in saliva of newborn deer fawns may predict mortality
The first-ever study of the levels of the stress hormone cortisol in the saliva of newborn white-tailed deer fawns yielded thought-provoking results that have Penn State researchers suggesting predation is not the only thing in the wild killing fawns. (2021-01-11)

Cardiac MRI shows lower degrees of myocarditis in athletes recovered from COVID-19
In a letter published in the December issue of the American Heart Association's medical journal Circulation a group of researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) dispute the most recent findings of the incidence of myocarditis in athletes with a history of COVID-19. (2021-01-08)

Skin-to skin contact with fathers may help newborns after caesarean delivery
Separating infants and their mothers after a Caesarean section delivery is common. A new study published in Acta Paediatrica has found that providing skin-to-skin contact with the father may provide benefits to a newborn. (2021-01-06)

AI algorithms detect diabetic eye disease inconsistently
In a paper published Jan. 5 in Diabetes Care, researchers compared seven algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy against the diagnostic expertise of retina specialists. (2021-01-05)

Largest, most diverse ever study of prostate cancer genetics brings disparities into focus
The largest, most diverse study of genetic variations related to prostate cancer shows evidence that genetics play some part in health disparities among different racial groups. The analysis includes 269 genetic variations that increase risk, 86 of them newly discovered by the researchers. Assessing risk based on a model incorporating these genetic factors researchers showed that men of African ancestry inherit about twice the prostate cancer risk on average compared to men of European ancestry. (2021-01-04)

New virtual screening strategy identifies existing drug that inhibits Covid-19 virus
A novel computational drug screening strategy combined with lab experiments suggest that pralatrexate, a chemotherapy medication originally developed to treat lymphoma, could potentially be repurposed to treat Covid-19. Haiping Zhang of the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology in Shenzhen, China, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology. (2020-12-31)

Strategies for adults experiencing sheltered homelessness during COVID-19 pandemic
What The Study Did: In this modeling study of simulated adults living in homeless shelters, daily symptom screening with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of individuals who had positive symptom screening paired with management at a nonhospital care site of people with mild to moderate COVID-19 was associated with a substantial decrease in infections and lowered costs over four months compared with no intervention across a wide range of epidemic scenarios. (2020-12-22)

Pregnant women with COVID-19 pass no virus but fewer-than-expected antibodies to newborns
Pregnant women may be especially vulnerable to developing more severe cases of COVID-19, but little is known about their anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response or how it may affect their offspring. A new study provides new insights that could help improve care for these women and their newborns and emphasizes the need for pregnant women to be considered in vaccine rollout plans. (2020-12-22)

New mammogram measures of breast cancer risk could revolutionise screening
World-first techniques for predicting breast cancer risk from mammograms that were developed in Melbourne could revolutionise breast screening by allowing it to be tailored to women at minimal extra cost. (2020-12-22)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.