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Current Nitrate News and Events, Nitrate News Articles.
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Freeze-dried soil is more suitable for studying soil reactive nitrogen gas emissions
Air-dried or oven-dried soils are commonly used in the laboratory to study soil reactive nitrogen gas emissions. A new research finds all drying methods increase the soil ammonium, nitrate, and dissolved organic N contents compared with fresh soil. (2020-03-05)

Nutrient pollution and ocean warming negatively affect early life of corals
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) found the survival and development of coral larvae in their first few days of life was negatively affected by elevated nutrients and a modest increase in water temperature. (2020-03-03)

Mystery of marine recycling squad solved
Nitrogen cycling in shelf waters is crucial to reduce surplus nutrients, which rivers pour out into the ocean. Yet many of its aspects are poorly understood. Scientists from Bremen have now succeeded in finding answers to a longstanding mystery in a key process of the nitrogen cycle. (2020-02-07)

A gold butterfly can make its own semiconductor skin
A nanoscale gold butterfly provides a more precise route for growing/synthesizing nanosized semiconductors that can be used in nano-lasers and other applications. (2020-02-05)

'Soil photosynthesis' helps to mitigate environmental pollution
An UCO research group has discovered that the effect from solar radiation produces an exchange of nitrogen gases in soil that allows for sequestering harmful gases and turning them into nitrate. (2020-01-15)

Ben-Gurion University researchers develop new realtime soil nitrate sensor
The new optical nitrate sensor is based on absorption spectroscopy. It enables continuous, real-time measurement of nitrate and can detect nitrate concentrations in the range of tens to hundreds of parts per million (ppm), which is the range relevant to growing crops. Its ability to continuously monitor soil nitrate levels produces a highly detailed portrayal of the rapidly changing concentrations of nitrate in the soil solution. The new sensor is also highly resistant to harsh chemical and physical soil conditions. (2020-01-14)

Rural water wells in High Plains Aquifer show large increase in nitrate levels
Private well owners should test water quality annually, according to a recent Kansas State University study that revealed nitrate levels in shallow wells above US Environment Protection Act standards. (2020-01-07)

Turning waste heat into hydrogen fuel
Hydrogen as an energy carrier can help us move away from fossil fuels, but only if it is created efficiently. One way to improve efficiency is to use waste heat that's left over from other industrial processes. (2019-11-14)

A study warns about the ecological impact caused by sediment accumulation in river courses
Insects, crustaceans and other water macroinvertebrates are more affected by the effect of sediment accumulation in river courses than the excess of nitrate in water environments, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE. Sediments that get accumulated in rivers -- due intensive agriculture and deforestation in gallery forests- alter the ecological traits of fluvial habitats and deteriorate the biological communities at all levels. (2019-11-13)

Explosion in Tianjin Port enhanced atmospheric nitrogen deposition over the Bohai Sea
In August 2015, a serious explosion occurred in Tianjin Port, leaving at least 50 dead and hundreds injured. Fire and smoke soared into the skies of Tianjin. A large amount of nitrogen-containing pollutants generated by the explosion were transmitted to the Bohai Sea. The impact area of the explosion on the Bohai Sea is about 1/5 of the total area of the Bohai Sea (2019-11-13)

Nitrous oxide emissions set to rise in the Pacific Ocean
The acidification of the Pacific Ocean in northern Japan is increasing the natural production rate of N2O, an ozone-depleting greenhouse gas. That's the finding of a study carried out jointly by scientists at EPFL, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology and appearing recently in Nature Climate Change. (2019-11-12)

Land management practices to reduce nitrogen load may be affected by climate changes
Nitrogen from agricultural production is a major cause of pollution in the Mississippi River Basin and contributes to large dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico. Illinois and other Midwestern states have set goals to reduce nitrogen load through strategies that include different land management practices. A new study from University of Illinois researchers, published in Journal of Environmental Management, uses computer modeling to estimate how those practices may be affected by potential changes in the climate, such as increased rainfall. (2019-10-18)

Study offers verdict for China's efforts on coal emissions
Researchers from China, France and the USA have evaluated China's success in stemming emissions from its coal-fired power plants (CPPs). CPPs are one of the main contributors to air pollution in China, and their proliferation over the last 20 years has had significant impacts on air quality and public health. These impacts led authorities to introduce measures to control emissions from CPPs and reduce their effects. (2019-09-12)

New salt-based propellant proven compatible in dual-mode rocket engines
For dual-mode rocket engines to be successful, a propellant must function in both combustion and electric propulsion systems. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used a salt-based propellant that had already been proven successful in combustion engines, and demonstrated its compatibility with electrospray thrusters. (2019-09-09)

Scientists who raced to study Kilauea's lava as it fueled rare phytoplankton bloom find surprise
Results from a rapid-response oceanographic expedition in the North Pacific reveal a surprise about how lava from the Kilauea Volcano, which erupted on the island of Hawai'i during the summer of 2018, triggered a vast phytoplankton bloom. (2019-09-05)

Kīlauea lava fuels phytoplankton bloom off Hawai'i Island
When Kīlauea Volcano erupted in 2018, it injected millions of cubic feet of molten lava into the nutrient-poor waters off the Big Island of Hawai'i. A study led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa and University of Southern California revealed that extensive phytoplankton growth was stimulated when nitrate was brought to the surface ocean as the lava warmed nutrient-rich deep waters and caused them to become buoyant. (2019-09-05)

Kilauea eruption fosters algae bloom in North Pacific Ocean
USC Dornsife and University of Hawaii researchers get a rare opportunity to study the immediate impact of lava from the Kilauea volcano on the marine environment surrounding the Hawaiian islands. (2019-09-05)

Mouthwash use could inhibit benefits of exercise, new research shows
An international team of scientists has shown that the blood pressure-lowering effect of exercise is significantly reduced when people rinse their mouths with antibacterial mouthwash, rather than water - showing the importance of oral bacteria in cardiovascular health. (2019-09-03)

Salt marshes' capacity to sink carbon may be threatened by nitrogen pollution
Salt marshes sequester carbon at rates an order of magnitude higher than land ecosystems. A new study from the MBL Ecosystems Center indicates nitrate pollution of coastal waters stimulates the decomposition of organic matter in salt marsh sediments that normally would have remained stable, and can alter the capacity of salt marshes to sequester carbon over the long term. (2019-08-23)

Optimizing fertilizer source and rate to avoid root death
Study assembles canola root's dose-response curves for nitrogen sources. (2019-08-21)

Detention basins could catch more than stormwater
Everywhere you go there are stormwater detention basins built near large construction projects intended to control the flow of rainwater and runoff. Now, those basins might help in controlling nitrogen runoff into rivers and lakes, according to Lauren E. McPhillips, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Penn State. (2019-08-12)

Previously unknown mechanism causes increased forest water use, new study says
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown mechanism that causes increased forest water use, advances understanding of soil biogeochemical control of forest water cycles and highlights threats to plants from water stress under acid deposition, according to a new study. (2019-07-31)

The discovery of a more effective method to estimate polluting emissions from nitrogen fertilizers
The discovery of a more effective method to estimate polluting emissions from nitrogen fertilizers. (2019-07-11)

Ammonia from agriculture influences cloud formation over Asia
The Asian tropopause aerosol layer (ATAL) is located at twelve to 18 kilometers height above the Middle East and Asia. This accumulation of aerosols in the Asian monsoon was discovered first in 2011. Its composition and effect, however, have been unknown so far. A European consortium of scientists has now found at this layer consists of crystalline ammonium nitrate. In the AIDA cloud chamber, climate researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) demonstrated how this substance is formed in the upper troposphere. (2019-07-11)

The far-future ocean: Warm yet oxygen-rich
The higher the temperature, the less gases are dissolved in the water. This simple physical relationship explains, among other things, the measurable loss of oxygen in the warming ocean. In Nature Communications, however, scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have published a model study suggesting that despite warming and centuries of deoxygenation the ocean will contain more oxygen in 4000 years than today. The study explains inconsistencies in the oxygen budget of previous simulations, but also raises new questions. (2019-06-27)

New research shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea
The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography. (2019-06-25)

EWG: Nitrate pollution of US tap water could cause 12,500 cancer cases each year
Nitrate pollution of US drinking water may cause up to 12,594 cases of cancer a year, according to a new peer-reviewed study by the Environmental Working Group. (2019-06-11)

2019 'dead zone' may be the second largest on record
A recent forecast of the size of the 'Dead Zone' in the northern Gulf of Mexico for late July 2019 is that it will cover 8,717-square-miles of the bottom of the continental shelf off Louisiana and Texas. The unusually high Mississippi River discharge in May controls the size of this zone, which will likely be the second largest zone since systematic measurements began in 1985. (2019-06-10)

A new view of wintertime air pollution
The team's unexpected finding suggests that in the US West and elsewhere, certain efforts to reduce harmful wintertime air pollution could backfire. Specifically, targeting nitrogen oxides emitted by cars and power plants could initially actually increase harmful air pollution, the researchers reported in their new paper, out today in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. (2019-05-09)

Infection biology: Gut microbe helps thwart Salmonella
LMU researchers have identified a bacterial species in the gut microbiome of the mouse which protects against infection by human-pathogenic Salmonella. (2019-04-18)

Urine salts provide evidence of Early Neolithic animal management
A close examination of midden soil layers at the early Neolithic site of A??kl? Höyük in Turkey reveals that they are highly enriched in sodium, chlorine, and nitrate salts commonly found in human and goat and sheep urine, offering a distinct signal for following the management of those animals through the history of the site. (2019-04-17)

Falling levels of air pollution drove decline in California's tule fog
The Central Valley's heavy wintertime tule fog -- known for snarling traffic and closing schools -- has been on the decline over the past 30 years, and falling levels of air pollution are the cause, says a new study by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley. The findings help explain the puzzling decades-long rise and fall in the number of 'fog days' affecting the region over the past century. (2019-04-10)

Rice cultivation: Balance of phosphorus and nitrogen determines growth and yield
Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences CEPLAS at the University of Cologne cooperates with partners from Beijing to develop new basic knowledge on nutrient signalling pathways in rice plants. This knowledge can contribute to greater food security. (2019-03-26)

Nitrogen pollution's path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected
A USDA Forest Service scientist and 29 co-authors completed one of the largest and longest examinations to trace unprocessed nitrate movement in forests. The team found that some nitrate occasionally moves too fast for biological uptake, resulting in 'unprocessed' nitrate bypassing the otherwise effective filter of forest biology. (2019-03-15)

Zero-emission diesel combustion using a non-equilibrium-plasma-assisted MnO2 filter
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University have used ozone from an atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium plasma together with the desulfurization catalyst MnO2 to almost completely eliminate NOx and SOx from diesel exhaust gas at a low temperature of 473 K. This research shows that ozone can be used to remove not only SOx but also NOx from fossil fuel combustion exhaust streams. (2019-03-07)

Nitric acid and ammonia electrosynthesis
The commercial synthesis methods for HNO3 and NH3 chemicals is Ostwald and Haber-Bosch process, respectively, but both of them are energy-intensive and high-emission. Thus, developing novel and green alternative strategies are crucial to solve the global energy and environmental crisis. Recently, researchers in Tianjin University reported electrochemical strategies to realize the production of HNO3 and NH3 from air and waste nitrate, which can open a new avenue for green production of HNO3 and NH3 at distributed sources. (2019-03-05)

Everything in moderation
In efforts to curb our use of greenhouse gas-generating fossil fuels, plant-based biofuels are among the top contenders as alternative liquid energy sources for transportation. However, strategies to produce high yields of biomass for fuels are not a one-size-fits-all proposition, according to a study led by UC Santa Barbara professor of ecology David Tilman. (2019-02-01)

Millions of Americans exposed to elevated nitrate levels in drinking water
More than 5.6 million Americans are exposed to nitrate in drinking water at levels that could cause health problems. In this first analysis of its kind, researchers also found that water systems with higher nitrate levels tend to serve communities with higher proportions of Hispanic residents. The findings could help inform programs to assist community water systems that might be vulnerable to contamination. (2019-01-17)

Study investigates socioeconomic disparities in nitrate levels in US drinking water
The first nationwide investigation of potential socioeconomic disparities in nitrate concentrations in US drinking water is reported in the open access journal Environmental Health. The authors, from Silent Spring Institute, USA, note that understanding the extent of current exposures -- particularly among vulnerable communities -- is critical for developing effective strategies to reduce exposure. (2019-01-16)

Green leafy vegetables may prevent liver steatosis
A larger portion of green leafy vegetables in the diet may reduce the risk of developing liver steatosis, or fatty liver. In a study published in PNAS researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show how a larger intake of inorganic nitrate, which occurs naturally in many types of vegetable, reduces accumulation of fat in the liver. There is currently no approved treatment for the disease, which can deteriorate into life-threatening conditions such as cirrhosis and liver cancer. (2018-12-17)

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