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Current Nitrogen News and Events, Nitrogen News Articles.
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Arrival delayed! Water, carbon and nitrogen were not immediately supplied to Earth
Writing in Nature, Cologne scientists present important new findings regarding the origin of oceans and life on Earth. (2020-03-12)
Ammonium salts reveal reservoir of 'missing' nitrogen in comets
Substantial amounts of ammonium salts have been identified in the surface material of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, researchers report, likely revealing the reservoir of nitrogen that was previously thought to be 'missing' in comets. (2020-03-12)
Microbes play important role in soil's nitrogen cycle
But different microbes have distinct roles to play, and environmental factors influence activity. (2020-03-11)
New error correction method provides key step toward quantum computing
An Army project devised a novel approach for quantum error correction that could provide a key step toward practical quantum computers, sensors and distributed quantum information that would enable the military to potentially solve previously intractable problems or deploy sensors with higher magnetic and electric field sensitivities. (2020-03-11)
Bronze Age diet and farming strategy reconstructed using integrative isotope analysis
Isotope analysis of two Bronze Age El Algar sites in present-day south-eastern Spain provides a integrated picture of diets and farming strategies, according to a study published March 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Corina Knipper from the Curt Engelhorn Center for Archaeometry, Germany, and colleagues. (2020-03-11)
Some domesticated plants ignore beneficial soil microbes
A review by biologists at UC Riverside and Washington State University, Vancouver finds that plant domestication has often had a negative effect on plant microbiomes, making domesticated plants more dependent on fertilizer and other soil amendments than their wild relatives. (2020-03-10)
An ultimate one-dimensional electronic channel in hexagonal boron nitride
IBS scientists have reported that stacking of ultrathin sheets of hBN in a particular way creates a conducting boundary with zero bandgap. (2020-03-06)
Freeze-dried soil is more suitable for studying soil reactive nitrogen gas emissions
Air-dried or oven-dried soils are commonly used in the laboratory to study soil reactive nitrogen gas emissions. (2020-03-05)
Cover crops can benefit hot, dry soils
Soil gets more than just 'cover' from cover crops. (2020-03-04)
Nutrient pollution and ocean warming negatively affect early life of corals
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) found the survival and development of coral larvae in their first few days of life was negatively affected by elevated nutrients and a modest increase in water temperature. (2020-03-03)
Marine cyanobacteria do not survive solely on photosynthesis
The University of Cordoba published a study in a journal from the Nature group that supports the idea that marine cyanobacteria also incorporate organic compounds from the environment. (2020-03-02)
Biologists capture fleeting interactions between regulatory proteins and their genome-wide targets
New York University biologists captured highly transient interactions between transcription factors -- proteins that control gene expression -- and target genes in the genome and showed that these typically missed interactions have important practical implications. (2020-03-02)
Cat food mystery foils diet study
How a study aimed at assessing the wildlife impacts of domestic cats was foiled by the mysterious ingredients of cat food. (2020-02-28)
Ancient meteorite site on Earth could reveal new clues about Mars' past
Scientists have devised new analytical tools to break down the enigmatic history of Mars' atmosphere -- and whether life was once possible there. (2020-02-26)
Super-urinators among the mangroves: Excretory gifts from estuary's busiest fish promote ecosystem health
A new University of Michigan-led study of individually radio-tracked tropical fish in a Bahamian mangrove estuary highlights the importance of highly active individuals in maintaining ecosystem health. (2020-02-26)
Rice scientists simplify access to drug building block
Rice University chemists further simplify their process to make essential precursor molecules for drug discovery and manufacture. (2020-02-24)
Looking for local levers
Coral reefs are not doomed. Although human activities threaten the iconic ecosystems in many different ways, scientists maintain that reefs can continue to thrive with the right assistance. (2020-02-24)
New artificial intelligence algorithm better predicts corn yield
With some reports predicting the precision agriculture market will reach $12.9 billion by 2027, there is an increasing need to develop sophisticated data-analysis solutions that can guide management decisions in real time. (2020-02-20)
Newly found bacteria fights climate change, soil pollutants
Cornell University researchers have found a new species of soil bacteria that is particularly adept at breaking down organic matter, including the cancer-causing chemicals that are released when coal, gas, oil and refuse are burned. (2020-02-20)
Reconstructing the diet of fossil vertebrates
Paleodietary studies of the fossil record are impeded by a lack of reliable and unequivocal tracers. (2020-02-17)
A real global player: Previously unrecognised bacteria as a key group in marine sediments
From the shoreline to the deep sea, one group of bacteria is particularly widespread in our planet's seabed: The so-called Woeseiales, which may be feeding on the protein remnants of dead cells. (2020-02-17)
Galactic cosmic rays affect Titan's atmosphere
Planetary scientists using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) revealed the secrets of the atmosphere of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn. (2020-02-14)
Nitrogen-fixing trees help tropical forests grow faster and store more carbon
New research published in Nature Communications shows that the ability of tropical forests to lock up carbon depends critically upon a group of trees that possess a unique talent -- the ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere. (2020-02-13)
Pea instead of soy in animal feed
By far the largest proportion of soybeans grown worldwide is used for animal feed. (2020-02-12)
Mystery of marine recycling squad solved
Nitrogen cycling in shelf waters is crucial to reduce surplus nutrients, which rivers pour out into the ocean. (2020-02-07)
Sugar ants' preference for pee may reduce greenhouse gas emissions
An unlikely penchant for pee is putting a common sugar ant on the map, as new research from the University of South Australia shows their taste for urine could play a role in reducing greenhouse gases. (2020-02-06)
A never-before described natural process in soil can convert nitrogen gases into nitrates
This finding is important, not only because it involves a never-before described natural process, but also because the nitrogen in the soil is crucial for global sustainability, as it affects the productivity of the ecosystem and air quality for living organisms, including humans. (2020-02-04)
Pluto's icy heart makes winds blow
A 'beating heart' of frozen nitrogen controls Pluto's winds and may give rise to features on its surface, according to a new study. (2020-02-04)
Flushing nitrogen from seawater-based toilets
With about half the world's population living close to the coast, using seawater to flush toilets could be possible with a salt-tolerant bacterium. (2020-02-03)
Lost in translation: Organic matter cuts plant-microbe links
Soil scientists from Cornell and Rice Universities have dug around and found that although adding carbon organic matter to agricultural fields is usually advantageous, it may muddle the beneficial underground communication between legume plants and microorganisms. (2020-01-30)
Historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea
New research led by The University of Hong Kong, Swire Institute of Marine Science in collaboration with Princeton University and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry highlights the historical impacts of development on coral reef loss in the South China Sea. (2020-01-29)
To make amino acids, just add electricity
By finding the right combination of abundantly available starting materials and catalyst, Kyushu University researchers were able to synthesize amino acids with high efficiency through a reaction driven by electricity. (2020-01-29)
Fungi as food source for plants
The number of plant species that extract organic nutrients from fungi could be much higher than previously assumed. (2020-01-29)
Nitrogen fertilizers finetune composition of individual members of the tomato microbiota
Nitrogen is one of the most important nutrients as is a key component for healthy crop production globally. (2020-01-29)
Meteorites reveal high carbon dioxide levels on early Earth
Tiny meteorites no larger than grains of sand hold new clues about the atmosphere on ancient Earth, according to scientists. (2020-01-29)
Cutting road transport pollution could help plants grow
Cutting emissions of particular gases could improve conditions for plants, allowing them to grow faster and capture more carbon, new research suggests. (2020-01-27)
Urine fertilizer: 'Aging' effectively protects against transfer of antibiotic resistance
Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan. (2020-01-22)
The salt of the comet
Under the leadership of astrophysicist Kathrin Altwegg, Bernese researchers have found an explanation for why very little nitrogen could previously be accounted for in the nebulous covering of comets: the building block for life predominantly occurs in the form of ammonium salts, the occurrence of which could not previously be measured. (2020-01-20)
How anti-sprawl policies may be harming water quality
Urban growth boundaries are created by governments in an effort to concentrate urban development -- buildings, roads and the utilities that support them -- within a defined area. (2020-01-16)
Nitrogen-fixing genes could help grow more food using fewer resources
Scientists have transferred a collection of genes into plant-colonizing bacteria that let them draw nitrogen from the air and turn it into ammonia, a natural fertilizer. (2020-01-15)
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