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Current Nuclear Power News and Events, Nuclear Power News Articles.
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Unleashing ultraviolet brings visible improvement
High-speed communication systems based on ultraviolet radiation are now in sight. (2017-12-18)

Novel mechanism that protects from glioblastoma identified
A group of researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have identified a protein called RanBP6 as a new regulator of EGFR. In a paper published in Nature Communications they show how silencing of RanBP6 promoted glioma growth, by upregulating EGFR expression. Moreover, reconstitution of RanBP6 in a mouse xenograft model leads to reduction in tumor growth. Authors state that these findings might have (2017-12-18)

Russian scientists developed a new technology of energy generation from bituminous coal
A team from Ural Federal University (UrFU) developed a new efficient technology of electrical power generation from bituminous coal. The results of the study were published in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. (2017-12-15)

Laser-boron fusion now 'leading contender' for energy
In a paper in the scientific journal Laser and Particle Beams today, lead author Heinrich Hora from the University of New South Wales in Sydney and international colleagues argue that the path to hydrogen-boron fusion is now viable, and may be closer to realization than other approaches, such as the deuterium-tritium fusion approach being pursued by US National Ignition Facility and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor under construction in France. (2017-12-13)

Space weather, EarthScope, and protecting the national electrical grid
Geomagnetic disturbances from solar storms or electromagnetic pulse weapons pose a high risk to the electrical power grid. This project examines a real-world example of 3-D mapping of the crust and mantle in the northwestern US from EarthScope data to determine risks posed by ground conductivity that could amplify or change how geomagnetic disturbances affect power lines. This new 3-D method detected surprising effects that the current 1-D method of risk assessment fails to detect. (2017-12-12)

A global north-to-south shift in wind power by end of century
Wind resources in the next century may decrease in many regions in the Northern Hemisphere -- and could sharply increase in several hotspot regions down south. (2017-12-11)

Discovery sets new world standard in nano generators
A team of University of Alberta engineers has developed a new way to produce electrical power that can charge handheld devices or sensors that monitor anything from pipelines to medical implants. The discovery sets a new world standard in triboelectric nanogenerators by producing a high-density DC current--a vast improvement over low-quality AC currents produced by other research teams. The devices can transform mechanical energy such as wind or vibrations into electricity. (2017-12-11)

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake
Engineers at Duke University develop a realistic proposition for creating a water cloak that moves water around an object by applying forces on dissolved ions through a carefully designed electromagnetic field. (2017-12-11)

Transformation to wind and solar achievable with low indirect GHG emissions
Different low carbon technologies from wind or solar energy to fossil carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) differ greatly when it comes to indirect GHG emissions in their life cycle. The new study finds that wind and solar energy belong to the more favorable when it comes to life-cycle emissions and scaling up these technologies would induce only modest indirect GHG emissions -- and hence not impede the transformation towards a climate-friendly power system. (2017-12-08)

What's in a name? How Taking a spouse's surname can define power in marriage
A new study led by a UNLV psychology professor shows that a wife's choice of surnames may influence perceptions of her husband's personality and the distribution of power in the marriage. (2017-12-08)

Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric
A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics. (2017-12-07)

Solar power advances possible with new 'double-glazing' device
A new 'double-glazing' solar power device -- which is unlike any existing solar panel and opens up fresh opportunities to develop more advanced photovoltaics -- has been invented by University of Warwick researchers. (2017-12-07)

Hydropower dams can be managed without an all-or-nothing choice between energy and food
Nearly 100 hydropower dams are planned for construction along tributaries off the Mekong River's 2,700-mile stretch. In Science Magazine, researchers present a mathematical formula to balance power generation needs with the needs of fisheries downstream. (2017-12-07)

New power devices could drastically reduce energy waste
At the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' International Electron Devices Meeting this week, researchers from MIT, semiconductor company IQE, Columbia University, IBM, and the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, presented a new design that, in tests, enabled gallium nitride power devices to handle voltages of 1,200 volts. (2017-12-07)

Mainz physicists propose a new method for monitoring nuclear waste
New scientific findings suggest neutrino detectors may play an important role in ensuring better monitoring and safer storage of radioactive material in nuclear waste repository sites. (2017-12-06)

PET tracer gauges effectiveness of promising Alzheimer's treatment
In the December featured basic science article in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Belgian researchers report on the first large-scale longitudinal imaging study to evaluate BACE1 inhibition with micro-PET in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. PET imaging has been established as an excellent identifier of the amyloid plaque and tau tangles that characterize Alzheimer's disease. Now it is proving to be an effective way to gauge treatment effectiveness. (2017-12-06)

Superior hydrogen catalyst just grows that way
A printing process uses natural forces to grow an inexpensive catalyst to replace platinum to lower the cost of hydrogen-powered cars. (2017-12-05)

Successful implantation of heart pump with power cable behind the ear, a Japan first!
In March 2017, the Cardiovascular Surgery Group at Osaka University successfully implanted a left ventricular assist device with an internal power cable tunneled through the neck to the head in a patient who was ineligible for a cardiac transplantation, destination therapy (DT) trial, a Japan first. The patient was recently discharged. (2017-12-04)

Research reveals how cells rebuild after mitosis
University of Bristol research has revealed how cells rebuild their nucleus and organise their genome when they divide -- a discovery which could have major implications for understanding cancer and degeneration. (2017-12-04)

PET identifies which prostate cancer patients can benefit from salvage radiation treatment
For prostate cancer patients who have rising levels of PSA (a cancer indicator) even after radical prostatectomy, early treatment makes a difference. In a study featured in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Australian researchers demonstrate that PET scans can identify which of these prostate cancer patients would benefit from salvage radiation treatment (SRT). (2017-12-04)

Uranium to replace plastic? Chemistry breakthrough could pave the way for new materials
Uranium can perform reactions that previously no one thought possible, which could transform the way industry makes bulk chemicals, polymers, and the precursors to new drugs and plastics, according to new findings from The University of Manchester. (2017-12-01)

Sometimes, it pays for the boss to be humble
It's good to be humble when you're the boss -- as long as that's what your employees expect. Researchers studying workplaces in China found that some real-life teams showed more creativity if the employees rated their bosses as showing more humility. (2017-11-28)

Physicists make most precise measurement ever of the proton's magnetic moment
An international collaboration of scientists from RIKEN's Ulmer Fundamental Symmetries Laboratory (FSL), Johannes Gutenberg-Universit├Ąt Mainz, Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg and GSI Darmstadt, have used high-precision techniques to make the most precise measurement to date of the magnetic moment of the proton, finding it to be 2.79284734462 plus or minus 0.00000000082 nuclear magnetons, the unit typically used to measure this property. (2017-11-27)

Studying heat transfer with computers is easier now
New research will enable heat transfer to be studied more accurately and efficiently using powerful super computers, thereby opening up interesting application and research perspectives. (2017-11-27)

New method to measure neutron star size uses modeling based on thermonuclear explosions
Neutron stars are made out of cold ultra-dense matter. How this matter behaves is one of the biggest mysteries in modern nuclear physics. Researchers developed a new method for measuring the radius of neutron stars which helps them to understand what happens to the matter inside the star under extreme pressure. (2017-11-22)

What does it mean for the husband when his wife keeps her own surname?
When a woman chooses not to take her husband's surname after marriage, people perceive her husband as being higher in traits related to femininity and lower in traits related to masculinity. He is also perceived as having less power in the relationship. This is according to a study led by Rachael Robnett of the University of Nevada in the US. The research is published in Springer's journal Sex Roles. (2017-11-21)

Reusing waste energy with 2-D electron gas
Novel approach utilizes high mobility two-dimensional electron gas, boosting thermoelectric conversion efficiency. (2017-11-20)

Cell cycle proteins help immune cells trap microbes with nets made of DNA
In your bloodstream, there are immune cells called neutrophils that, when faced with a pathogenic threat, will expel their DNA like a net to contain it. These DNA snares are called neutrophil extracellular traps or NETs. Researchers from Germany and the United States describe an important step in how these NETs are released and how they stop a fungus from establishing an infection in mice and human cells in the journal Developmental Cell. (2017-11-20)

Homes should not be abandoned after a big nuclear accident
New research suggests that few people, if any, should be asked to leave their homes after a big nuclear accident, which is what happened in March 2011 following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. (2017-11-19)

New theory rewrites opening moments of Chernobyl disaster
A brand-new theory of the opening moments during the Chernobyl disaster, the most severe nuclear accident in history, based on additional analysis is presented for the first time in the journal Nuclear Technology, an official journal of the American Nuclear Society. (2017-11-17)

Andalusian experts discover new procedures for DNA stability
In eukaryotic cells the proximity of the genes to the nuclear pores, which are found in the nuclear membrane, contributes to maintaining the integrity of the genome. This is due to the fact that the anchoring of DNA to the pore during transcription avoids the formation of DNA-RNA hybrids, which are a natural source of DNA breaks and genome instability. (2017-11-16)

Identified: Power grid links vulnerable to cascading failures
In North America, a small set of vulnerable patches within large power grid networks is disproportionately responsible for costly cascading power failures, a new study finds. (2017-11-16)

Nearby pulsars shed light on the antimatter puzzle
There are too many high-energy positrons in the cosmic rays reaching the Earth. These positrons (particles that are antimatter equivalents of electrons) could be being produced by pulsars in our vicinity. The most recent measurements from the HAWC Observatory in Mexico have practically excluded this possibility, strengthening the competing and much more exotic hypothesis concerning the origin of the excess positrons. (2017-11-16)

A fast reactor system to shorten the lifetime of long-lived fission products
Researchers in Japan have proposed a more efficient method to reduce radioactive waste. The study involves converting radioactive material into short-lived nuclides by absorbing surplus neutrons in the core peripheral portion of a small fast reactor faster than they are generated in the core, thus providing an effective way to lessen the burden of nuclear waste on future generations. (2017-11-14)

Scalable clusters make HPC R&D easy as Raspberry Pi
A quest to help the systems software community work on very large supercomputers without having to actually test on them has spawned an affordable, scalable system using thousands of inexpensive Raspberry Pi nodes. (2017-11-13)

Promising sensors for submarines, mines and spacecraft
Researchers from the Physics Department of Moscow State University and their colleagues have discovered a mechanism that allows gas sensors, based on nanocrystalline metal oxides, to work at room temperature. This invention will raise the efficiency of environmental monitoring at nuclear power plants, on submarines and spacecrafts. The discovery was reported in Scientific Reports. (2017-11-10)

The next generation of power electronics? Gallium nitride doped with beryllium
Physicists at Aalto University have made a breakthrough in revising methods largely discarded 15 years ago. They have discovered a microscopic mechanism that will allow gallium nitride semiconductors to be used in electronic devices that distribute large amounts of electric power. (2017-11-09)

Study helps make microgrids a more reliable power source
Engineers at MIT have developed a method for guaranteeing the stability of any microgrid that runs on direct current, or DC -- an architecture that was originally proposed as part of the MIT Tata Center's uLink project. The researchers found they can ensure a microgrid's stability by installing capacitors, which are devices that even out spikes and dips in voltage, of a particular size, or capacitance. (2017-11-09)

Novel nuclear medicine test can identify kidney transplant infection
German scientists have developed a novel nuclear medicine test that can determine whether a kidney transplant patient has developed infection in the transplanted tissue. The study, which utilizes positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), is presented in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2017-11-08)

Novel intermolecular surface force reveals actomyosin driving mechanism
The actin and myosin complex (actomyosin) generates contraction force of a muscle utilizing the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis reaction. Many attempts have thus been made to explain the molecular origin of the actomyosin motility. (2017-11-07)

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