Current Nursing Homes News and Events

Current Nursing Homes News and Events, Nursing Homes News Articles.
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Promoting and protecting human milk and breastfeeding during COVID-19
With stressors mounting daily on the health care system due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a de-prioritization of the childbearing family has been noted. Their care has changed, resulting in mothers forced to go through labor and birth without their partners, parents barred from NICU visitation, and discharge of mothers and newborns early without enough expert lactation care. (2021-02-18)

Robotic dogs & laughter therapy: combating loneliness & isolation while social distancing
Robotic dogs, laughter therapy and mindfulness are some of the ways that might help people - particularly the elderly - cope with loneliness and social isolation while social distancing, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2021-02-17)

Nursing home staff responses to pandemic reveal resilience, shortcomings: Concordia study
Writing in the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice, PhD student Daniel Dickson, his supervisor Patrik Marier, professor of political science, and co-author Robert Henry Cox of the University of South Carolina perform a comparative analysis of nursing home workers' experiences. In it, they look at Quebec (including those at government-run CHSLDs), British Columbia, Washington State and Ohio by reviewing 336 articles in six newspapers published between late-February and mid-June 2020. (2021-02-16)

Improving discharge process key to reducing avoidable rehospitalizations, MU study finds
Throughout her career, Lori Popejoy provided hands-on clinical care in a variety of health care settings, from hospitals and nursing homes to community centers and home health care agencies. (2021-02-15)

Difficulties to care for ICU patients caused by COVID-19
Intensive care nurses highlight patient isolation, fear of the unknown and using nurses who do not usually work in the ICU as key factors in caring for critical COVID-19 patients (2021-02-10)

COVID-19 telemonitoring program helps reduce hospital admissions and ER visits
New Rochelle, NY, February 9, 2021--The rapid upscaling of a telemonitoring program in which health care providers performed daily telemedicine check-ins on COVID-19 patients faced a unique set of challenges. (2021-02-10)

Addressing breastfeeding disparities for African American mothers
An abundance of data underscore the importance of breastfeeding and human milk for the optimal health of infants, children, mothers, and society. But while breastfeeding initiation rates have increased to more than 80% in the US, a disparity exists for African American mothers and infants. In this group, breastfeeding is initiated only about 69% of the time. (2021-02-08)

Study finds Americans went out more after face mask mandates
Face masks mandates have led people to spend less time at home, but whether this has exposed Americans to more risk is still a question, according to a new study published Thursday in Scientific Reports. (2021-02-05)

Digital health divide runs deep in older racial and ethnic minorities
Results of a study qualitatively exploring reasons for digital health information disparity reveal a deep digital health divide that has important implications for helping older adults with COVID-19 vaccinations. Participants who were older, less educated, economically disadvantaged and from ethnic groups (African American, Afro-Caribbean or Hispanic American) were up to five times less likely to have access to digital health information than were those who were younger, more highly educated, had a higher income, or were European Americans. (2021-02-03)

Socioeconomic, demographic and urban factors influence the spread of COVID-19
Per capita income, population volume and density, the structure of cities, transport infrastructure or whether districts have their own schools are all factors that can affect the spread of COVID-19. This has been confirmed by a study carried out in 73 districts in Barcelona (Spain) by researchers from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili, the results of which have been published in the Journal of Public Health. (2021-01-31)

Generous parental leave leads to staff shortages, nursing home deaths
A new paper in the Review of Economic Studies finds that a generous parental leave policy nurses enjoyed in Denmark caused nursing shortages, which resulted in a decline in the quality of hospital and nursing home care. The study estimates a large increase in nursing home mortality. (2021-01-28)

Study shows when housing quality is poor, children suffer
A new nationally representative study in the Journal of Child Health Care, led by researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital, has found poor-quality housing is independently associated with poorer pediatric health, and suggests ways health care providers and housing programs may address those findings. (2021-01-28)

Ancient indigenous New Mexican community knew how to sustainably coexist with wildfire
Wildfires are the enemy when they threaten homes in California and elsewhere. But a new study led by SMU suggests that people living in fire-prone places can learn to manage fire as an ally to prevent dangerous blazes, just like people who lived nearly 1,000 years ago. (2021-01-27)

Dietary adherence and the fight against obesity
While eating less and moving more are the basics of weight control and obesity treatment, finding ways to help people adhere to a weight-loss regimen is more complicated. Understanding what features make a diet easier or more challenging to follow can help optimize and tailor dietary approaches for obesity treatment. (2021-01-25)

Growing up in a bilingual home has lasting benefits
New research has found that growing up in a bilingual home can provide unexpected cognitive benefits later in life. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, demonstrates for the first time that adults who acquired their second language as a young child (early bilinguals) are quicker at shifting attention and quicker at detecting visual changes compared to adults who learnt their second language later in life (late bilinguals). (2021-01-22)

Addressing the impact of structural racism on disparities in children with Type 1 diabetes
Advancements in diabetes technology have improved quality of life and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes. However, data show that a subset of children is being left behind. Those from low-income families and non-Hispanic Black (NHB) children are not experiencing benefits associated with technological advances, and are at higher risk for diabetes complications and adverse outcomes through ongoing poor glycemic control. (2021-01-22)

Does where older US adults die affect their wellbeing at the end of life?
Where people die can affect the quality of their deaths and the end-of-life care that they receive. A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that satisfaction with end-of-life care was rated highest when individuals died at home. (2021-01-21)

UK government must urgently rethink lateral flow test roll out, warn experts
UK government plans to widen the roll out of the Innova lateral flow test without supporting evidence risks serious harm, warn experts in The BMJ today. (2021-01-12)

Simple monitoring could reduce medicine misuse in care homes
Nurse-led monitoring of patients for signs and symptoms associated with documented 'undesirable effects' of medicines has potential to prevent avoidable harm, and optimize prescribing. (2021-01-11)

What is surgical smoke and what can be done about it?
Surgical smoke poses a health risk to everyone in the operating room. Perioperative teams exposed to surgical smoke report twice as many respiratory health issues as the general public. The smoke can even contain viruses. Researchers suggest that policies and laws mandating the evacuation of surgical smoke from operating rooms are the best way to reduce the negative health impacts on perioperative staff as well as surgical patients. (2021-01-07)

What does 'do not resuscitate' mean? Varying interpretations may affect patient care, reports American Journal of Nursing
When patients have a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order, it means they have chosen not to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). But hospital nurses report significant variations in the way DNR orders are perceived or acted on in clinical practice, reports a survey study in the January issue of the American Journal of Nursing (AJN). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-12-23)

For college students, skin cancer risk remains high in winter months
New research finds college students could be just as at risk for developing skin cancer in the dead of winter as they are in the middle of summer. (2020-12-17)

UBC study highlights need for more effective staffing in care homes
Even the best-managed long-term care homes will need to step up to get through the second wave of the pandemic (2020-12-17)

Nurse practitioners bring big savings to long-term care facilities in Quebec
Countries worldwide face challenges meeting the growing needs for long-term care services because of high costs. A study led by researchers from McGill University and Université du Québec en Outaouais shows that introducing nurse practitioners can significantly reduce costs and improve patient safety. (2020-12-17)

Improving hospital nurse staffing is associated with fewer deaths from sepsis
According to a new study published in American Journal of Infection Control, improving nurse staffing as proposed in pending legislation in New York state would likely save lives of sepsis patients and save money by reducing the length of hospital stays. (2020-12-17)

Aging journal fills knowledge gaps on race, mental health
A new special issue of the journal Innovation in Aging, titled ''Race and Mental Health Among Older Adults: Within- and Between-Group Comparisons,'' is expressly devoted to much-needed research on aging and mental health within racial and ethnic minority populations (e.g., African Americans, Latinx, and Asian Americans, as well as subgroups within these larger pan-ethnic categories). (2020-12-16)

Nearly half of young drivers are resuming driving just weeks after sustaining a concussion
Researchers found that nearly half of adolescents who sought specialty care for a concussion were back to driving when asked approximately two weeks after the injury, even though few had returned to exercise and sports. (2020-12-15)

COVID-19: indoor air in hospitals and nursing homes require more attention
A variety of measures are necessary to prevent the spread of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 in hospitals and nursing homes. It is particularly important to develop an appropriate strategy to protect healthcare workers from airborne transmission. More attention is required in respect to indoor air in such facilities and to further training of the staff. (2020-12-14)

Behavioral strategies to promote a national COVID-19 vaccine program
National efforts to develop a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine at 'warp speed' will likely yield a safe and effective vaccine by early 2021. However, this important milestone is only the first step in an equally important challenge: getting a majority of the U.S. public vaccinated. (2020-12-14)

Genomic analysis of early SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in Boston shows role of superspreading events
SARS-CoV-2 was introduced to the Boston area of Massachusetts many times in early 2020, according to a new analysis of virus genomes, but only a small number of importations - including one related to an international business conference - led to most cases there. (2020-12-10)

Nursing homes may misinterpret mental changes, falls as infection
There is a widespread belief that a change in the mental status or an increase in falls in a nursing home resident may indicate an underlying infection. This contributes to the overuse of antibiotics, according to revised clinical guidance by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The guidance, published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, outlines criteria on evaluating non-localizing symptoms as indicators of infection. (2020-12-09)

In California, COVID death rate higher for people with IDD living in congregate settings
A new study published recently in ScienceDirect by researchers from Syracuse University and SUNY Upstate Medical University shows that California residents who receive services for intellectual and development disabilities (IDD) have lower COVID-19 case rates but a higher case-fatality rate than the general population. (2020-12-09)

Corona pandemic could be better tackled by reducing aerosol transmission.
Aerosols and their spread play an essential role in the transmission of COVID-19. However, the risk of transmission could be significantly reduced if more could be done to reduce indoor airborne viruses. The Working committee particulate matter (AAF) has therefore issued an statement with concrete recommendations. These include window ventilation, exhaust ventilation, air purification systems and CO2 measuring devices for indoor areas such as classrooms or transportation, and increased use of N95 and FFP2 masks. (2020-12-08)

Survey: COVID-19 prevention top concern of home-care agencies
Tens of thousands of Massachusetts residents depend on home care to support their health as they age or cope with physical challenges. That care often requires close personal contact, increasing the risk of contracting COVID-19 among both home-care clients and the aides who provide their care. (2020-12-08)

Novel anti-craving mechanism discovered to treat cocaine relapse
Cocaine continues to be one of the most commonly abused illicit drugs in the United States. Pre-clinical literature suggests that targeting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) in the brain may represent a novel approach to treating cocaine use disorder. Specifically, GLP-1R agonists, which are FDA-approved for treating diabetes and obesity, have been shown to reduce voluntary drug taking and seeking in preclinical models of cocaine used disorder. (2020-12-07)

COVID-19 transmission in nursing homes may be affected by nurses and direct care workers with multip
Nurses and other long-term care workers in nursing homes who hold multiple jobs, may be one of the factors contributing to the spread of COVID-19 in these facilities, according to a new study published in Medical Care Research and Review. The findings examine the likelihood that nurses and direct care workers in long-term care facilities hold a second job, and how demographic differences between the two may affect this probability. (2020-12-07)

Integrated anemia-SCD test demonstrates accurate results in study at 2020 ASH meeting
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University presented research today in which Hemex Health's affordable Gazelle platform diagnostic technology successfully tested 46 patients with 100% sensitivity and over 92.3% specificity for anemia and with 100% accuracy for hemoglobin variants. The preliminary study included blood samples collected from Cleveland-area patients studied for anemia and sickle cell disease. (2020-12-05)

Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing had higher COVID-19 death rates
New research has found that Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing, including limited access to broadband internet and low rates of health insurance, had more COVID-19 deaths in spring 2020. (2020-12-03)

New lab-on-a-chip infection test could provide cheaper, faster portable diagnostics
A tiny new silicon-based lab-on-chip test could pave the way for cheap handheld infectious disease testing. (2020-12-02)

People returning home from skilled nursing facilities need tailored instructions
Transitions from a skilled nursing facility to home are burdensome to already vulnerable individuals and are points in time where errors and gaps in care are more likely. COVID-19 has exacerbated transitional challenges, which can affect quality of life and cause the patient to lose progress made during their stay at a care facility. (2020-12-02)

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