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Moms need help to overcome breastfeeding worries, study says
More support is needed to help women overcome doubts in the hope that they will breastfeed their babies for longer, says a University of Alberta nutrition researcher. (2013-07-11)

CWRU nursing school to study home visits for people with HIV and chronic illnesses
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing will assess how effective palliative care home health visits are in treating people with HIV and other chronic illnesses in a new four-year, $1.7-million study funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research. (2013-07-11)

Study investigates whether improving sleep reduces heart disease risk in caregivers
The University of South Florida College of Nursing is conducting research to improve sleep in those caring for people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, with the aim of determining if better sleep affects heart health. The $1.9-million, four-year study is funded by National Institute on Aging. (2013-07-09)

NIH grant makes STaRs of 8 Wayne State nursing students
Eight Wayne State University undergraduate nursing students are gaining unique insight about the research field thanks to a $40,000 grant awarded to the university's College of Nursing and School of Medicine from the National Institute of Nursing Research of the National Institutes of Health. (2013-07-02)

Having a job helps women with HIV manage their illness, according to new research
Having a job helps women with HIV manage their illnesses, according to researchers from Case Western Reserve University and the University of California at San Francisco. (2013-06-26)

Vitamin D reduces blood pressure and relieves depression in women with diabetes
In women who have type 2 diabetes and show signs of depression, vitamin D supplements significantly lowered blood pressure and improved their moods, according to a Loyola University Chicago study. Vitamin D even helped the women lose a few pounds. (2013-06-24)

Innovative intervention program improves life for rural women in India living with HIV/AIDS
A multidisciplinary team from the US and India found that an intervention program known as ASHA-LIFE significantly improved adherence to antiretroviral therapy, CD4+ t-cell levels, and nutritional outcomes for rural women living with HIV/AIDS in India. (2013-06-21)

Review: Composition of care team critical to improved outcomes for nursing home patients
An interdisciplinary team that actively involves a nursing home patient's own physician plus a pharmacist has substantially better odds of improving the quality of nursing home care, according to a new systemic review of studies on long-term-stay patients' care. (2013-06-20)

U of M researchers identify risk and protective factors for youth involved in bullying
New research out of the University of Minnesota identifies significant risk factors for suicidal behavior in youth being bullied, but also identifies protective factors for the same group of children. (2013-06-19)

Loyola receives $1.5 million grant to study vitamin D for diabetes and depression
A Loyola University Chicago Niehoff School of Nursing researcher has received a four-year, $1.49 million grant to study whether vitamin D can improve mood in women with diabetes who are depressed. (2013-06-18)

Carnegie Mellon method uses network of cameras to track people in complex indoor settings
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a method for tracking the locations of multiple individuals in complex, indoor settings using a network of video cameras, creating something similar to the fictional Marauder's Map used by Harry Potter to track comings and goings at the Hogwarts School. The method was able to automatically follow the movements of 13 people within a nursing home, even though individuals sometimes slipped out of view of the cameras. (2013-06-12)

With new $1.7 million grant, U-M, Johns Hopkins researchers will develop dementia treatment tool
With the help of a $1.7-million grant from the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Nursing Research), researchers from the University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University will design an easy-to-use, web-based tool that helps caregivers track, understand and treat the behavioral symptoms of dementia. (2013-06-10)

Stable bedtime helps sleep apnea sufferers adhere to treatment
A consistent bedtime routine is likely key to helping people with obstructive sleep apnea adhere to their prescribed treatment, according to Penn State researchers. (2013-06-05)

National Hartford Centers of Gerontological Nursing Excellence awards new fellows, scholars
The National Hartford Centers of Gerontological Nursing Excellence today announced $1,332,000 in awards to the latest cohort of Claire M. Fagin Fellows and Patricia G. Archbold Scholars studying gerontological nursing in academic settings across the US. (2013-06-05)

$1.76 million federal grant to support palliative care program at CWRU nursing school
Medical advancements that extend the lives of patients with cancer, heart failure and other serious chronic diseases have created another need: More clinicians skilled in specialized care for people with terminal illnesses. Acknowledging this need, Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing has received a five-year, $1.76 million grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research for a pre- and postdoctoral fellowship program in what is known as palliative care. (2013-06-03)

USF College of Nursing gets $2.1M award from PCORI to study cancer symptom management
The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute has approved a $2.1-million award to the University of South Florida College of Nursing to study (2013-06-03)

Columbia nursing study finds women less at risk than men for health-care-associated infections
A new study from Columbia University School of Nursing supports a growing body of evidence that women are less likely to contract bloodstream or surgical site infections than their male counterparts. (2013-05-30)

Wolters Kluwer Health receives 13 awards from the ASHPE
Wolters Kluwer Health is pleased to announce that its Lippincott Williams & Wilkins published journals won 13 ASHPE awards in 10 categories. ASHPE's annual awards competition recognizes member articles and publications for editorial, design, print and online award categories. (2013-05-20)

Study finds disagreement on the role of primary care nurse practitioners
A study published in the May 16 New England Journal of Medicine finds that, while primary care physicians and nurse practitioners for the most part agreed with Institute of Medicine recommendations that advance practice nurses (2013-05-15)

CWRU researcher searches for global views of nurses' end-of-life care for patients
Nurses will use extreme measures to save their patients and parents; but if they were dying, they prefer less aggressive ones for themselves, according to results from an international survey on nurses' end-of-life preferences. (2013-05-14)

U of M research: Mentoring, leadership program key to ending bullying in at-risk teen girls
New research from experts within the University of Minnesota School of Nursing has found teen girls at high risk for pregnancy reported being significantly less likely to participate in social bullying after participating in an 18-month preventive intervention program. (2013-04-30)

8th edition of LSUHSC faculty's textbook published
The 8th Edition of PULMONARY PHYSIOLOGY by Dr. Michael G. Levitzky, Professor of Physiology, Anesthesiology, and Cardiopulmonary Science at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, was published this month by McGraw-Hill in its Lange Physiology Series. Called the preeminent textbook for pulmonary physiology, this book has been the first choice and primary educational tool worldwide for this subject for more than 30 years. (2013-04-23)

Reducing the pain of movement in intensive care
Monitoring pain and providing analgesics to patients in intensive care units during non-surgical procedures, such as turning and washing, can not only reduce the amount of pain but also reduce the number of serious adverse events including cardiac arrest, finds new research in BioMed Central's open access journal Critical Care. (2013-04-17)

NYU Nursing receives $6.7M NIH grant to continue the center for drug use and HIV research
NYU College of Nursing's Dr. Sherry Deren, Director of the Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR), received a five-year, $6.7 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health for continued funding (for years 16-20) of the CDUHR. (2013-04-16)

Magnet hospitals achieve lower mortality, reports Medical Care
Lower mortality and other improved patient outcomes achieved at designated (2013-04-16)

Genetic markers linked to the development of lymphedema in breast cancer survivors
A new UCSF study has found a clear association between certain genes and the development of lymphedema, a painful and chronic condition that often occurs after breast cancer surgery and some other cancer treatments. (2013-04-16)

Groundbreaking study to transform service users' involvement in mental health care
A groundbreaking study could help to revolutionise the way in which mental health service users and their carers plan their care. (2013-04-15)

CWRU study finds mothers with postpartum depression want online professional treatment
Mothers suffering from postpartum depression after a high-risk pregnancy would turn to online interventions if available anonymously and from professional healthcare providers, according to researchers from Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing and College of Arts and Sciences. (2013-04-04)

College athletes twice as likely to have depression than retired collegiate athletes
A survey of current and former college athletes finds depression levels significantly higher in current athletes, a result that upended the researchers' hypothesis. (2013-04-02)

Phone app for managing heart disease created by Rutgers-Camden nursing student
A new smart phone app that helps patients manage heart disease and stay out of the hospital has been developed by a team led by a Rutgers-Camden nursing student. (2013-04-01)

Sexual agreements among gay couples show promise for HIV prevention
The majority of gay men in relationships say they establish a (2013-03-26)

Registered Nurses Association gives awards to 2 St. Michael's nursing leaders
The Registered Nurses Association of Ontario has recognized two St. Michael's nursing leaders for outstanding leadership. (2013-03-25)

CWRU professor offers 'lessons from abroad' on caring for a graying population
Aging expert M.C. Terry Hokenstad, PhD, social work professor in aging from the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University, calls his research findings, (2013-03-20)

Nurses can play key role in reducing deaths from world's most common diseases
The 38-page report, issued by WHO, highlights evidence-based, value-added nursing interventions which have been shown to reduce such lifestyle risk factors as tobacco use, alcohol dependence, physical inactivity and unhealthy diets. The examples contained in the report are proven activities that nurses can start doing today to make a meaningful impact with their patients and in their community. Many of the interventions have been proven to reduce costs and improve the quality of care. (2013-03-19)

Nurse understaffing increases infection risk in VLBW babies
Very low birth weight infants, those weighing less than 3.25 pounds, account for half of infant deaths in the United States each year, yet a new study released in today's issue of JAMA-Pediatrics documents that these critically ill infants do not receive optimal nursing care, which can lead to hospital-acquired infections that double their death rate and may result in long-term developmental issues affecting the quality of their lives as adults. (2013-03-18)

Wayne State researcher gives new name to exhaustion suffered by cancer patients
The fatigue experienced by patients undergoing cancer treatments has long been recognized by health care providers, although its causes and ways to manage it are still largely unknown. A Wayne State University researcher believes the condition affects some patients much more than others and is trying to determine the nature of that difference. (2013-03-08)

More baccalaureate-prepared nurses in hospitals connected to fewer patient deaths
When hospitals hire more nurses with four-year degrees, patient deaths following common surgeries decrease, according to new research by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing's Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research as reported in the March issue of the prestigious policy journal Health Affairs. Less than half the nation's nurses (45 percent) have baccalaureate degrees, according to the most recent data available. (2013-03-07)

The American Association of Neuroscience Nurses (AANN) celebrates 45th Annual Educational Meeting
The American Association of Neuroscience Nurses (AANN) will celebrate its 45th Annual Education Conference designed to help neuroscience nurses explore the critical, evidence-based information of its specialty to support a wide range of patient conditions. In recognition of the field's advances over the past 45 years, AANN's official research publication, the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, will introduce an iPad app edition at the meeting. The AANN Annual Educational Meeting takes place March 9-12 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (2013-03-07)

Nurse migration in North and Central America strengthening health systems
A new report, Strengthening health systems in North and Central America: What role for migration?, sponsored by the Migration Policy Institute, seeks to draw attention to the cross-border migration in the Americas and suggests ways the migration could be managed to meet the demand for health care services in the region. (2013-03-05)

Affordable care alone may not be enough to help Latinos overcome cancer care barriers
A combination of financial, cultural and communication barriers contribute to preventing underserved Latino men with prostate cancer access to the care and treatment they need, according to a new study conducted by the UCLA School of Nursing. (2013-03-05)

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