Current Nutritional Supplements News and Events | Page 4

Current Nutritional Supplements News and Events, Nutritional Supplements News Articles.
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McMaster chemists develop foolproof new test to track the fats we eat
A team of researchers at McMaster University has developed a reliable and accurate blood test to track individual fat intake, a tool that could guide public health policy on healthy eating. (2020-05-15)

Nutrimedia, a resource that assesses the veracity of messages about food and nutrition
The journal PLOS ONE has published an article that explains the methodology used by Nutrimedia to assess the veracity of messages about nutrition. As reflected in the article, the Nutrimedia project, developed by the Science Communication Observatory (OCC) of the Department of Communication at Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) and by the Iberoamerican Cochrane Center. (2020-05-14)

Vitamin D determines severity in COVID-19 so government advice needs to change
Researchers in Trinity College Dublin are urging the Irish government to immediately change recommendations on vitamin D supplements given recent changes by Welsh, English and Scottish governments. (2020-05-12)

Microalgae food for honey bees
A microscopic algae ('microalgae') could provide a complete and sustainably sourced supplemental diet to boost the robustness of managed honey bees, according to research just published by Agricultural Research Service scientists in the journal Apidologie. Poor nutrition in honey bees is often an underlying factor in colony losses because malnutrition amplifies the detrimental effects of parasites, pathogens, and pesticides. (2020-05-11)

Revealing links between education and a good diet
Educational status appears to have positive influence on a healthy diet, particularly in low income countries, according to new research examining European nutritional data. (2020-05-07)

Children don't know how to get proper nutrition information online
Children looking for health information online could end up more prone to obesity. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, shows a lack of digital health literacy can lead children to misinterpret portions, adopt recommendations intended for adults, or take guidance from noncredible sources. (2020-05-06)

Link identified between dietary selenium and outcome of COVID-19 disease
An international team of researchers, led by Professor Margaret Rayman at the University of Surrey, has identified a link between the COVID-19 cure rate and regional selenium status in China. (2020-04-29)

Scientists trace path from PTSD to heart disease
A new study helps explain why people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) face a higher risk of heart disease at an earlier age than people without PTSD. (2020-04-27)

Iron deficiency in corals?
When iron is limited, the microalgae that live within coral cells change how they take in other trace metals, which could have cascading effects on vital biological functions and perhaps exacerbate the effects of climate change on corals. (2020-04-23)

Dietary supplements an important weapon for fighting off COVID-19
Supplements containing vitamins C and D and other micronutrients, sometimes in amounts exceeding the federally recommended levels, are a safe, effective and low-cost means of helping your immune system fight off COVID-19 and other acute respiratory tract diseases. (2020-04-23)

Extra payments motivate sobriety and employment among people recovering from addiction
After a yearlong study of people with opioid dependence, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that adding $8 an hour to their paychecks may help those in recovery stay drug free longer, as well as encourage them to get and hold regular jobs. (2020-04-20)

UM study finds diverse diet as effective as sports supplements for female athletes
A recently released study from the University of Montana has discovered that common 'edge,' sports nutrition products, are no more effective at promoting recovery in female athletes as regular, carbohydrate-rich, often less-expensive potato-based foods. (2020-04-17)

Follow your gut
We may try to consciously make good food choices, but our bodies have their own way of weighing in. A new study reveals a learning mechanism orchestrated by the digestive and nervous systems that leads animals to actively seek out certain foods. These results are a step towards understanding how eating-related disorders, such as obesity, occur. (2020-04-06)

Labeling of cannabidiod products becoming a public health concern
The need for accurate and informative labeling of hemp and hemp-derived cannabidiol (CBD) products is a critical public health issue. (2020-03-25)

Vitamin D boosts chances of walking after hip fracture
Senior citizens who are not vitamin D deficient have a better chance of walking after hip fracture surgery, according to a Rutgers-led study. The findings in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggest that vitamin D deficiency could limit mobility in older adults, said senior author Sue Shapses, a professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. (2020-03-17)

Sugar tax has more public support than expected
The increase in diet-related illness has led to a high burden of costs for society. However, German policymakers, in comparison with their international counterparts, have so far been reluctant to make political interventions that support healthy eating. The concern is that interventions, such as imposing taxes, will be unpopular. Researchers at the University of Göttingen have now shown that there is clear support for nutritional policy action in Germany. The results have been published in the scientific journal Nutrients. (2020-03-11)

Bumblebees aversion to pumpkin pollen may help plants thrive
Cornell University researchers have found that squash and pumpkin pollen have physical, nutritional and chemical defense qualities that are harmful to bumblebees. The results of their recent study suggest that deterring bumblebees from collecting and eating pollen may provide an evolutionary benefit to cucurbit plants. (2020-03-11)

Confusing standards lead to extra sugar in kids' breakfast cereals
Parents may let their children consume more sugar from their breakfast cereal than intended due to insufficient industry nutritional guidelines. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, finds little improvement in the nutritional value of breakfast products marketed to children despite 12 years of self-imposed industry regulations intended to improve child health. (2020-03-06)

Alzheimer's: Can an amino acid help to restore memories?
Scientists at the Laboratoire des Maladies Neurodégénératives (CNRS/CEA/Université Paris-Saclay) and the Neurocentre Magendie (INSERM/Université de Bordeaux) have just shown that a metabolic pathway plays a determining role in Alzheimer's disease's memory problems. This work also shows that supplying a specific amino acid as a nutritional supplement in a mouse model of Alzheimer's restores spatial memory affected early. This is a promising path for reducing memory loss related to that disease. (2020-03-03)

Sugar gets the red light from consumers in new study
Researchers have found that sugar content is the most important factor for people when making healthy food choices -- overriding fat and salt. (2020-02-28)

Antioxidant supplements do not improve male fertility, NIH study suggests
Antioxidant supplements do not improve semen quality among men with infertility, according to a new study supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development . (2020-02-28)

Omega-3 fats do not protect against cancer
Omega-3 fats do not protect against cancer -- according to new University of East Anglia research. Increased consumption of omega-3 fats is widely promoted globally because of a common belief that it will protect against, or even reverse, diseases such as cancer, heart attacks and stroke. But two systematic reviews find that omega-3 supplements may slightly reduce coronary heart disease mortality and events, but slightly increase risk of prostate cancer. Both beneficial and harmful effects are small. (2020-02-28)

Antioxidant precursor molecule could improve brain function in patients with MS
The naturally occurring molecule N-acetylcysteine (NAC) shows benefit in a clinical trial for multiple sclerosis. (2020-02-26)

The best preoperative definition of cancer-related malnutrition depends on cancer type
The best approach for surgeons to identify malnourished cancer patients before they have a cancer operation may be specifically related to the type of cancer. (2020-02-26)

Electrolyte supplements don't prevent illness in athletes, study finds
Electrolyte supplements popular with endurance runners can't be relied on to keep essential sodium levels in balance, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators. (2020-02-25)

Low folate levels can indicate malnutrition in hospital patients
About 10% of patients who come to complex care hospitals may have low levels of folate and other indicators of malnutrition, investigators say. (2020-02-18)

Insufficient evidence backing herbal medicines for weight loss
Researchers from the University of Sydney have conducted the first global review of herbal medicines for weight loss in 19 years, finding insufficient evidence to recommend any current treatments. (2020-02-17)

Pea instead of soy in animal feed
By far the largest proportion of soybeans grown worldwide is used for animal feed. This is particularly problematic because soybean cultivation inflicts massive environmental damage on supplier countries. The Institute of Agricultural and Nutritional Sciences at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) is therefore currently researching domestic alternatives as part of the SilaToast project, with the aim of determining what special handling alternative feedstuffs will require to equal the nutritional value of soybeans. (2020-02-12)

Herd immunity: Disease transmission from wildlife to livestock
Scientists provide guidelines for minimizing the risk of spreading disease between elk and cattle in Southern Alberta. (2020-02-12)

Antioxidant reverses BPD-induced fertility damage in worms
Treatment with a naturally occurring antioxidant, CoQ10, restores many aspects of fertility in C. elegans worms following exposure to BPA Findings offer possible path toward undoing BPA-induced reproductive harms in people Although CoQ10 is available over the counter, it is not yet clear whether the compound could improve human fertility or do so safely (2020-02-06)

Bumble bees prefer a low-fat diet
Are bees dying of malnourishment? Professor Sara Diana Leonhardt examines the interactions between plants and insects with her work group at the TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan. Using behavioral experiments, her team analyzes how bumble bees evaluate the quality of food sources and how foods of various qualities affect their well-being. (2020-02-05)

Protein could offer therapeutic target for breast cancer metastasis
A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that targeting a protein known as heat shock protein 47 could be key for suppressing breast cancer metastasis. (2020-02-05)

Researchers validate transferable & accessible method to quantify flavanols & procyanidins
Building on over two decades of research, Mars and the University of California Davis have developed a new methodology to measure cocoa flavanols and procyanidins that is more accurate and more reliable than previous analytical approaches. The method, published in Food & Function, has been developed in partnership with Waters, the world's leading specialty measurement company and chromatography pioneer, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, US Dept. of Commerce (NIST). (2020-02-03)

On the menu: Study says dining out is a recipe for unhealthy eating for most Americans
Study finds most restaurant meals eaten by Americans are of poor nutritional quality; minimal changes over 14 years. (2020-01-29)

Study suggests US households waste nearly a third of the food they acquire
American households waste, on average, almost a third of the food they acquire, according to economists, who say this wasted food has an estimated aggregate value of $240 billion annually. Divided among the nearly 128.6 million U.S. households, this waste could be costing the average household about $1,866 per year. (2020-01-23)

Results of long-term study could help identify children at risk of future type 2 diabetes
Researchers at the University of Plymouth and Nestlé have revealed new insights into the factors that predispose children to developing type 2 diabetes in adult life. (2020-01-23)

Observational study explores fish oil supplements, testicular function in healthy young men
An observational study of nearly 1,700 young healthy Danish men looked at how fish oil supplements were associated with testicular function as measured by semen quality and reproductive hormone levels. Limitations of this study include a lack of information on the actual concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in the fish oil supplements self-reported by the men. Researchers suggest randomized clinical trials are needed. (2020-01-17)

Gene network helps to turn white fat into beneficial calorie-burning fat
1.9 billion people in the world are overweight. Of these, 650 million people are obese, which increases the risk of secondary diseases such as cancer. Professor Martin Klingenspor and his team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) examine how our fat metabolism affects our health. In cooperation with the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), the team has uncovered a network of genes that could turn energy-storing fat into beneficial calorie-burning fat. (2020-01-09)

Need to control blood sugar? There's a drink for that, says UBC prof
With more people with diabetes and pre-diabetes looking for novel strategies to help control blood sugar, new research from UBC's Okanagan campus suggests that ketone monoester drinks--a popular new food supplement--may help do exactly that. (2020-01-07)

Zinc, folic acid supplements fail to enhance male fertility
Zinc and folic acid, a pair of dietary supplements long touted as an effective treatment for male infertility, failed to improve pregnancy rates, sperm counts, and sperm potency in a new study conducted at University of Utah Health and other medical centers in conjunction with the National Institutes of Health. According to the researchers, the finding presents the most definitive evidence to date that so-called fertility supplements do not live up expectations. (2020-01-07)

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